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  1. Shoutir Kishore Chatterjee (2003). Statistical Thought: A Perspective and History. Oup Oxford.
    In this unique monograph, based on years of extensive work, Chatterjee presents the historical evolution of statistical thought from the perspective of various approaches to statistical induction. Developments in statistical concepts and theories are discussed alongside philosophical ideas on the ways we learn from experience.
  2. John L. Pollock (1990). Nomic Probability and the Foundations of Induction. Oxford University Press.
    In this book Pollock deals with the subject of probabilistic reasoning, making general philosophical sense of objective probabilities and exploring their ...
  3. A. Hooker, J. J. Leach & E. F. McClennen (eds.) (1978). Foundations and Applications of Decision Theory. D. Reidel.
    Foundations and Applications of Decision Theory, Vol. 11, 1-16. All Rights Reserved. Copyright © 1978 by D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, ...
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  4. John M. Vickers (1988). Chance and Structure: An Essay on the Logical Foundations of Probability. Oxford University Press.
    Discussing the relations between logic and probability, this book compares classical 17th- and 18th-century theories of probability with contemporary theories, explores recent logical theories of probability, and offers a new account of probability as a part of logic.
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  5. René Carmona (ed.) (2008). Indifference Pricing: Theory and Applications. Princeton University Press.
    This is the first book about the emerging field of utility indifference pricing for valuing derivatives in incomplete markets.
  6. Patrick Suppes (1984). Probabilistic Metaphysics. Blackwell.
  7. John Leslie (1996). The End of the World: The Science and Ethics of Human Extinction. Routledge.
    Are we in imminent danger of extinction? Yes, we probably are, argues John Leslie in his chilling account of the dangers facing the human race as we approach the second millenium. The End of the World is a sobering assessment of the many disasters that scientists have predicted and speculated on as leading to apocalypse. In the first comprehensive survey, potential catastrophes - ranging from deadly diseases to high-energy physics experiments - are explored to help us understand the risks. One (...)
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  8. John Earman (ed.) (1984). Testing Scientific Theories. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
    Rich with historical and cultural value, these works are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.
  9. A. J. Ayer (1972). Probability and Evidence. [London]Macmillan.
  10. Keith M. Parsons (2010). Rational Episodes: Logic for the Intermittently Reasonable. Prometheus Books.
    Preface for instructors -- Preface for students (you really should read it) -- What is logic about? -- Sentential logic basics -- Sentential logic proofs -- More sentential logic : contradictions, tautologies and assumptions -- Predicate logic basics -- Proofs in predicate logic -- Probability : the basic rules of life -- The theorem of Dr. Bayes -- Probability illusions : why we are so bad at inductive reasoning -- Studies have shown ... or have they? -- Inference to the (...)
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  11. Isaac Levi (1967/1973). Gambling with Truth. Cambridge,Mit Press.
  12. J. L. Mackie (1973). Truth, Probability and Paradox: Studies in Philosophical Logic. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
    Classic work by one of the most brilliant figures in post-war analytic philosophy.
  13. Paul Thagard (1992). Conceptual Revolutions. Princeton University Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Paul Thagard draws on history and philosophy of science, cognitive psychology, and the field of artificial intelligence to develop a ...
  14. Nicholas Rescher (1995). Luck: The Brilliant Randomness of Everyday Life. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
    An esteemed American philosopher reflects on the nature of luck and its historical role in war, business, lotteries, and romance, and delineates the differences ...
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  15. John Maynard Keynes (1921/2004). A Treatise on Probability. Dover Publications.
    With this treatise, an insightful exploration of the probabilistic connection between philosophy and the history of science, the famous economist breathed new life into studies of both disciplines. Originally published in 1921, this important mathematical work represented a significant contribution to the theory regarding the logical probability of propositions. Keynes effectively dismantled the classical theory of probability, launching what has since been termed the “logical-relationist” theory. In so doing, he explored the logical relationships between classifying a proposition as “highly probable” (...)
  16. Mark Battersby (2009). Is That a Fact?: A Field Guide for Evaluating Statistical and Scientific Information. Broadview Press.
    We are inundated by scientific and statistical information, but what should we believe? How much should we trust the polls on the latest electoral campaign? When a physician tells us that a diagnosis of cancer is 90% certain or a scientist informs us that recent studies support global warming, what should we conclude? How can we acquire reliable statistical information? Once we have it, how do we evaluate it? Despite the importance of these questions to our lives, many of us (...)
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  17. John Venn (1888/2006). The Logic of Chance. Dover Publications.
    No mathematical background is necessary to appreciate this classic of probability theory, which remains unsurpassed in its clarity, readability, and sheer charm. Its author, British logician John Venn (1834-1923), popularized the famous Venn Diagrams that are commonly used in teaching elementary mathematics.
  18. Peter Urbach & Colin Howson (1993). Scientific Reasoning: The Bayesian Approach. Open Court.
  19. Hugues Leblanc (1962/2006). Statistical and Inductive Probabilities. Dover Publications.
    This evenhanded treatment addresses the decades-old dispute among probability theorists, asserting that both statistical and inductive probabilities may be treated as sentence-theoretic measurements, and that the latter qualify as estimates of the former. Beginning with a survey of the essentials of sentence theory and of set theory, the author examines statistical probabilities, showing that statistical probabilities may be passed on to sentences, and thereby qualify as truth-values. An exploration of inductive probabilities follows, demonstrating their reinterpretation as estimates of truth-values. Each (...)
  20. Allan Combs (1996). Synchronicity: Science, Myth, and the Trickster. Marlowe & Co..
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  21. James Franklin (2009). What Science Knows: And How It Knows It. Encounter Books.
    In What Science Knows, the Australian philosopher and mathematician James Franklin explains in captivating and straightforward prose how science works its magic ...
  22. Henry Ely Kyburg (ed.) (1980). Studies in Subjective Probability. Krieger.
  23. Ian Hacking (1995). The Emergence of Probability. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press.
    Ian Hacking here presents a philosophical critique of early ideas about probability, induction and statistical inference and the growth of this new family of ...
  24. Richard Jeffrey (1983). The Logic of Decision. University of Chicago Press.
  25. A. W. F. Edwards (1972). Likelihood. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
    Dr Edwards' stimulating and provocative book advances the thesis that the appropriate axiomatic basis for inductive inference is not that of probability, with its addition axiom, but rather likelihood - the concept introduced by Fisher as a measure of relative support amongst different hypotheses. Starting from the simplest considerations and assuming no more than a modest acquaintance with probability theory, the author sets out to reconstruct nothing less than a consistent theory of statistical inference in science.
  26. Leonard J. Savage (1954). The Foundations of Statistics. Wiley Publications in Statistics.
    Classic analysis of the subject and the development of personal probability; one of the greatest controversies in modern statistcal thought.
  27. Mark de Rond & Iain Morley (eds.) (2010). Serendipity: Fortune and the Prepared Mind. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction. Fortune and the prepared mind Iain Morley and Mark de Rond; 1. The stratigraphy of serendipity Susan E. Alcock; 2. Understanding humans - serendipity and anthropology Richard Leakey; 3. HIV and the naked ape Robin Weiss; 4. Cosmological serendipity Simon Singh; 5. Serendipity in astronomy Andrew C. Fabian; 6. Serendipity in physics Richard Friend; 7. Liberalism and uncertainty Oliver Letwin; 8. The unanticipated pleasures of the writing life Simon Winchester.
  28. David Bohm (1957/1999). Causality and Chance in Modern Physics. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    CHAPTER ONE Causality and Chance in Natural Law. INTRODUCTION IN nature nothing remains constant. Everything is in a perpetual state of transformation, ...