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  1. John David North, John J. Roche & A. C. Crombie (eds.) (1985). The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A.C. Crombie. Distributors for the United States and Canada Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    INTRODUCTION This volume of essays is meant as a tribute to Alistair Crombie by some of those who have studied with him. The occasion of its publication is ...
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  2. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
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  3. Norman Stockman (1983). Antipositivist Theories of the Sciences: Critical Rationalism, Critical Theory, and Scientific Realism. Sold and Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by Kluwer.
  4. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  5. René von Schomberg (ed.) (1993). Science, Politics, and Morality: Scientific Uncertainty and Decision Making. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Current environmental problems and technological risks are a challenge for a new institutional arrangement of the value spheres of Science, Politics and Morality. Distinguished authors from different European countries and America provide a cross-disciplinary perspective on the problems of political decision making under the conditions of scientific uncertainty. cases from biotechnology and the environmental sciences are discussed. The papers collected for this volume address the following themes: (i) controversies about risks and political decision making; (ii) concepts of science for policy; (...)
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  6. Tom W. Goff (1980). Marx and Mead: Contributions to a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  7. James E. Curtis (1970). The Sociology of Knowledge: A Reader. London,Duckworth.
  8. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  9. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  10. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  11. Renée Weber (ed.) (1986). Dialogues with Scientists and Sages: The Search for Unity. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  12. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  13. Arie L. Molendijk & Peter Pels (eds.) (1998). Religion in the Making: The Emergence of the Sciences of Religion. Brill.
    This volume explores the ways in which religion became the object of scientific research in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  14. Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  15. Sidney Morgenbesser (1967). Philosophy of Science Today. New York, Basic Books.
    The nature and aim of science, by E. Nagel.--Truth and provability, by L. Henkin.--Completeness, by L. Henkin.--Computability, by S. C. Kleene.--Necessary truth, by W. V. Quine.--What is a scientific theory? By P. Suppes.--Science and simplicity, by N. Goodman.--Scientific explanation, by C. G. Hempel.--Observation and interpretation, by N. R. Hanson.--Probability and confirmation, by H. Putnam.--Utility and acceptance of hypotheses, by I. Levi.--Space and time, by A. Grünbaum.--Problems of microphysics, by P. Feyerabend.--Aspects of explanation in biological theory, by M. Beckner.--Psychologism and methodological (...)
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  16. Nicholas Jardine (1986). The Fortunes of Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    The belief that science shows an accumulation of a body of objective knowledge has been widely challenged by philosophers and historians in the latter half of this century. In this treatise, Dr. Jardine defends this belief with a careful appreciation of the complexities involved, drawing on many controversial issues concerning truth in science, interpretation of past theories, and grounds of scientific method.
  17. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social institutions and concepts. The (...)
  18. Charles Cooper (ed.) (1972/1973). Science, Technology and Development. London,F. Cass.
    Science, Technology and Production in the Underdeveloped Countries: An Introduction By Charles Cooper* The uncritical notion that it would be easy to orient ...
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  19. Peter Kosso (1992). Reading the Book of Nature: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory survey to the philosophy of science suitable for beginners and nonspecialists. Its point of departure is the question: why should we believe what science tells us about the world? In this attempt to justify the claims of science the book treats such topics as observation data, confirmation of theories, and the explanation of phenomena. The writing is clear and concrete with detailed examples drawn from contemporary science: solar neutrinos, the gravitational bending of light, and the creation/evolution (...)
  20. David F. Horrobin (1969). Science is God. Aylesbury (Bucks.),Medical and Technical Publishing.
  21. Jerome R. Ravetz (1990). The Merger of Knowledge with Power: Essays in Critical Science. Mansell.
  22. Peter H. Hare (1975). Causing, Perceiving, and Believing: An Examination of the Philosophy of C. J. Ducasse. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  23. Marian Przełęcki (1969). The Logic of Empirical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  24. Karl R. Popper (1959/1992). The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Routledge.
    Described by the philosopher A.J. Ayer as a work of 'great originality and power', this book revolutionized contemporary thinking on science and knowledge. Ideas such as the now legendary doctrine of 'falsificationism' electrified the scientific community, influencing even working scientists, as well as post-war philosophy. This astonishing work ranks alongside The Open Society and Its Enemies as one of Popper's most enduring books and contains insights and arguments that demand to be read to this day.
  25. Peter Achinstein (1991). Particles and Waves: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together eleven essays by the distinguished philosopher of science, Peter Achinstein. The unifying theme is the nature of the philosophical problems surrounding the postulation of unobservable entities such as light waves, molecules, and electrons. How, if at all, is it possible to confirm scientific hypotheses about "unobservables"? Achinstein examines this question as it arose in actual scientific practice in three nineteenth-century episodes: the debate between particle and wave theorists of light, Maxwell's kinetic theory of gases, and J.J. (...)
  26. Milton A. Rothman (1992). The Science Gap: Dispelling the Myths and Understanding the Reality of Science. Prometheus Books.
  27. Richard Swinburne (ed.) (1974). The Justification of Induction. New York: Oxford University Press.
  28. Joseph Margolis (1987). Science Without Unity: Reconciling the Human and Natural Sciences. Blackwell.
  29. Glenn Pearce & Patrick Maynard (eds.) (1973). Conceptual Change. Boston,D. Reidel.
  30. Nicholas Maxwell (1998). The Comprehensibility of the Universe: A New Conception of Science. Oxford University Press.
    This book puts forth a radically new conception of science. Maxwell argues that the prevailing view of the relation between scientific theory and evidence is untenable; he calls for a new orthodoxy that sees science as making a hierarchy of assumptions about the comprehensibility of the universe. This new conception has significant implications for both philosophy and science, promises to heal the rift between the two, and will be essential reading for people working in both fields.
  31. Richard Schlegel (1967). Completeness in Science. New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts.
  32. Joseph Grünfeld (1973). Science and Values. Amsterdam,Grüner.
    HISTORICAL INSIGHT METAHISTORY The term 'history' stands for past human events, their record and the process or technique of making the record. ...
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  33. Janet Wolff (1975). Hermeneutic Philosophy and the Sociology of Art: An Approach to Some of the Epistemological Problems of the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sociology of Art and Literature. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  34. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  35. Paul Thagard (1992). Conceptual Revolutions. Princeton University Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Paul Thagard draws on history and philosophy of science, cognitive psychology, and the field of artificial intelligence to develop a ...
  36. Dick Taverne (2005). The March of Unreason: Science, Democracy, and the New Fundamentalism. Oxford University Press.
    In The March of Unreason, Dick Taverne expresses his concern that irrationality is on the rise in Western society, and argues that public opinion is increasingly dominated by unreflecting prejudice and an unwillingness to engage with factual evidence. Discussing topics such as genetically modified crops and foods, organic farming, the MMR vaccine, environmentalism, the precautionary principle, and the new anti-capitalist and anti-globalization movements, he argues that the rejection of the evidence-based approach nurtures a culture of suspicion, distrust, and cynicism, and (...)
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  37. Erwin Chargaff (1977). Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science. Seabury Press.
  38. Joseph C. Pitt (ed.) (1988). Theories of Explanation. Oxford University Press.
    Since the publication of Carl Hempel and Paul Oppenheim's ground-breaking work "Studies in the Logic of Explanation," the theory of explanation has remained a major topic in the philosophy of science. This valuable collection provides readers with the opportunity to study some of the classic essays on the theory of explanation along with the best examples of the most recent work being done on the topic. In addition to the original Hempel and Oppenheim paper, the volume includes Scriven's critical reaction (...)
  39. Wolfgang Krohn, Edwin T. Layton & Peter Weingart (eds.) (1978). The Dynamics of Science and Technology: Social Values, Technical Norms, and Scientific Criteria in the Development of Knowledge. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  40. Alan Irwin & Brian Wynne (eds.) (1996). Misunderstanding Science?: The Public Reconstruction of Science and Technology. Cambridge University Press.
    Misunderstanding Science? offers a challenging new perspective on the public understanding of science. In so doing, it also challenges existing ideas of the nature of science and its relationships with society. Its analysis and case presentation are highly relevant to current concerns over the uptake, authority, and effectiveness of science as expressed, for example, in areas such as education, medical/health practice, risk and the environment, technological innovation. Based on several in-depth case-studies, and informed theoretically by the sociology of scientific knowledge, (...)
  41. Larry Laudan (1984). Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate. University of California Press.
    Laudan constructs a fresh approach to a longtime problem for the philosopher of science: how to explain the simultaneous and widespread presence of both agreement and disagreement in science. Laudan critiques the logical empiricists and the post-positivists as he stresses the need for centrality and values and the interdependence of values, methods, and facts as prerequisites to solving the problems of consensus and dissent in science.
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  42. Jarrett Leplin (1997). A Novel Defense of Scientific Realism. Oxford University Press.
    Leplin attempts to reinstate the common sense idea that theoretical knowledge is achievable, indeed that its achievement is part of the means to progress in empirical knowledge. He sketches the genesis of the skeptical position, then introduces his argument for Minimalist Scientific Realism -- the requirement that novel predicitons be explained, and the claim that only realism about scientific theories can explain the importance of novel prediction.
  43. Robert L. Wolke (ed.) (1975). Impact, Science on Society. Saunders.
  44. Paul M. McNeill (1993). The Ethics and Politics of Human Experimentation. Cambridge University Press.
    This book focuses on experimentation that is carried out on human beings, including medical research, drug research and research undertaken in the social sciences. It discusses the ethics of such experimentation and asks the question: who defends the interests of these human subjects and ensures that they are not harmed? The author finds that ethical research depends on the adequacy of review by committee. Indeed most countries now rely on research ethics committees for the protection of the interests of the (...)
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  45. Tord H. Ganelius (ed.) (1986). Progress in Science and its Social Conditions: Nobel Symposium 58, Held at Lidingö, Sweden, 15-19 August 1983. Published for the Nobel Foundation by Pergamon Press.
  46. Raymond John Seeger & R. S. Cohen (eds.) (1974). Philosophical Foundations of Science: Proceedings of Section L, 1969, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Reidel.
  47. James Bryant Conant (1982/1983). Modern Science and Modern Man. Greenwood Press.
  48. Mario Augusto Bunge (ed.) (1973). The Methodological Unity of Science. Boston,Reidel.
    ... presented as "the'tirst ph'uosopher who attempte'd to be both exact and in tune with the science of his day. Certain rules of philosophical method are ...
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  49. D. M. Hausman (1992). The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive overview of the structure, strategy and methods of assessment of orthodox theoretical economics.
  50. Stephen R. L. Clark (2000). Biology and Christian Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating and wide-ranging book mounts a profound enquiry into some of the most pressing questions of our age, by examining the relationship between biological science and Christianity. The history of biological discovery is explored from the point of view of a leading philosopher and ethicist. What effect should modern biological theory and practice have on Christian understanding of ethics? How much of that theory and practice should Christians endorse? Can Christians, for example, agree that biological changes are not governed (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 367