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1 — 50 / 261
  1. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  2. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  3. Richard J. Brook (1973). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. The Hague,M. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION Philonous: You see, Hylas, the water of yonder fountain, how it is forced upwards, in a round column, to a certain height, at which it breaks ...
  4. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
  5. R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.) (1974). Methodological and Historical Essays in the Natural and Social Sciences. Boston,Reidel.
  6. Peter Kosso (1992). Reading the Book of Nature: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory survey to the philosophy of science suitable for beginners and nonspecialists. Its point of departure is the question: why should we believe what science tells us about the world? In this attempt to justify the claims of science the book treats such topics as observation data, confirmation of theories, and the explanation of phenomena. The writing is clear and concrete with detailed examples drawn from contemporary science: solar neutrinos, the gravitational bending of light, and the creation/evolution (...)
  7. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  8. Evelyn Fox Keller & Helen E. Longino (eds.) (1996). Feminism and Science. Oxford University Press.
    (Series copy) The new Oxford Readings in Feminism series maps the dramatic influence of feminist theory on every branch of academic knowledge. Offering feminist perspectives on disciplines from history to science, each book assembles the most important articles written on its field in the last ten to fifteen years. Old stereotypes are challenged and traditional attitudes upset in these lively-- and sometimes controversial--volumes, all of which are edited by feminists prominent in their particular field. Comprehensive, accessible, and intellectually daring, the (...)
  9. Craig Dilworth (1994/1986). Scientific Progress: A Study Concerning the Nature of the Relation Between Successive Scientific Theories. Kluwer Academic.
    In this way Dilworth succeeds in providing a conception of science in which scientific progress is based on both rational and empirical considerations.
  10. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  11. Michael Lynch (1993). Scientific Practice and Ordinary Action: Ethnomethodology and Social Studies of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosophers, historians, and sociologists of science have grown interested in the daily practices of scientists. Recent studies have drawn linkages between scientific innovations and more ordinary procedures, craft skills, and sources of sponsorship. These studies dispute the idea that science is the application of a unified method or the outgrowth of a progressive history of ideas. This book critically reviews arguments and empirical studies in two areas of sociology that have played a significant role in the 'sociological turn' in science (...)
  12. Raymond John Seeger & R. S. Cohen (eds.) (1974). Philosophical Foundations of Science: Proceedings of Section L, 1969, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Reidel.
  13. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  14. Nicholas Jardine (1986). The Fortunes of Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    The belief that science shows an accumulation of a body of objective knowledge has been widely challenged by philosophers and historians in the latter half of this century. In this treatise, Dr. Jardine defends this belief with a careful appreciation of the complexities involved, drawing on many controversial issues concerning truth in science, interpretation of past theories, and grounds of scientific method.
  15. Nancy J. Nersessian (1984). Faraday to Einstein: Constructing Meaning in Scientific Theories. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    PARTI The Philosophical Situation: A Critical Appraisal We must begin with the mistake and find out the truth in it. That is, we must uncover the source of ...
  16. James Wiley (2012). Theory and Practice in the Philosophy of David Hume. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Hume and the problem of theory and practice in philosophy and political theory -- Hume's naturalism and skepticism in the treatise and his appeal from theory to practice -- The systematic theory of theory of the treatise of human nature -- The behaviorist theory of practice of the treatise -- The practical philosophies of skepticism and commercial humanism -- The common sense theory of theory of the enquiries, essays, and history of England -- The common sense theory of practice of (...)
  17. Sidney Morgenbesser (1967). Philosophy of Science Today. New York, Basic Books.
    The nature and aim of science, by E. Nagel.--Truth and provability, by L. Henkin.--Completeness, by L. Henkin.--Computability, by S. C. Kleene.--Necessary truth, by W. V. Quine.--What is a scientific theory? By P. Suppes.--Science and simplicity, by N. Goodman.--Scientific explanation, by C. G. Hempel.--Observation and interpretation, by N. R. Hanson.--Probability and confirmation, by H. Putnam.--Utility and acceptance of hypotheses, by I. Levi.--Space and time, by A. Grünbaum.--Problems of microphysics, by P. Feyerabend.--Aspects of explanation in biological theory, by M. Beckner.--Psychologism and methodological (...)
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  18. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  19. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social institutions and concepts. The (...)
  20. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  21. Larry Laudan (1984). Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate. University of California Press.
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  22. J. E. McGuire (2000). Science Unfettered: A Philosophical Study in Sociohistorical Ontology. Ohio University Press.
    As a result, the works of Popper, Kuhn, Quine, and Lakatos, as well as Heidegger, Gadamer, Nietzsche, Foucault, and Feyerabend, are called into play.
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  23. Lynda I. A. Birke (1994). Feminism, Animals, and Science: The Naming of the Shrew. Open University Press.
  24. James Bryant Conant (1982/1983). Modern Science and Modern Man. Greenwood Press.
  25. Peter H. Hare (1975). Causing, Perceiving, and Believing: An Examination of the Philosophy of C. J. Ducasse. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  26. William A. Wallace (ed.) (1994). Ethics in Modeling. Pergamon.
    The use of mathematical models to support decision making is proliferating in both the public and private sectors. Advances in computer technology and greater opportunities to learn the appropriate techniques are extending modeling capabilities to more and more people. As powerful decision aids, models can be both beneficial or harmful. At present, few safeguards exist to prevent model builders or users from deliberately, carelessly, or recklessly manipulating data to further their own ends. Perhaps more importantly, few people understand or appreciate (...)
  27. Herman O. A. Wold (ed.) (1987/1989). Theoretical Empiricism: A General Rationale for Scientific Model-Building. Paragon House.
  28. Bentley Glass (1965/1981). Science and Ethical Values. Greenwood Press.
  29. Lindley Darden (1991). Theory Change in Science: Strategies From Mendelian Genetics. Oxford University Press.
    This innovative book focuses on the development of the gene theory as a case study in scientific creativity.
  30. H. N. Pollack (2003). Uncertain Science ...: Uncertain World. Cambridge University Press.
    Scientific uncertainty puzzles many people. The puzzlement arises when scientists have more than one answer, and disagree among themselves. This book helps people find their way through this maze of scientific contradiction and uncertainty. By acquainting them with the ways that uncertainty arises in science, how scientists accommodate and make use of uncertainty, and how they reach conclusions in the face of uncertainty, the book enables readers to confidently evaluate uncertainty from their own perspectives, in terms of their own experiences.
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  31. Alan H. Cromer (1997). Connected Knowledge: Science, Philosophy, and Education. Oxford University Press.
    When physicist Alan Sokal recently submitted an article to the postmodernist journal Social Text, the periodical's editors were happy to publish it--for here was a respected scientist offering support for the journal's view that science is a subjective, socially constructed discipline. But as Sokal himself soon revealed in Lingua Franca magazine, the essay was a spectacular hoax--filled with scientific gibberish anyone with a basic knowledge of physics should have caught--and the academic world suddenly awoke to the vast gap that has (...)
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  32. Graeme Kirkpatrick (2008). Technology and Social Power. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This text provides an overview of debates in the sociology of technology, including definitions of the main terms and concepts and discussion of the dominant positions, especially in recent scholarship. At the same time, it develops a novel perspective on the subject based in critical theory, bridging work in the sociology of science and technology with wider debate in social theory. It integrates empirical and theoretical elements in well-themed chapters and draws on interesting contemporary examples such as mobile phones and (...)
  33. Dane Scott & Blake Francis (eds.) (2011). Debating Science: Deliberation, Values, and the Common Good. Prometheus Books.
  34. E. B. Davies (2003). Science in the Looking Glass: What Do Scientists Really Know? Oxford University Press.
    In this wide-ranging book, Brian Davies discusses the basis for scientists' claims to knowledge about the world. He looks at science historically, emphasizing not only the achievements of scientists from Galileo onwards, but also their mistakes. He rejects the claim that all scientific knowledge is provisional, by citing examples from chemistry, biology and geology. A major feature of the book is its defense of the view that mathematics was invented rather than discovered. A large number of examples are used to (...)
  35. Philip Kitcher (1993). The Advancement of Science: Science Without Legend, Objectivity Without Illusions. Oxford University Press.
    During the last three decades, reflections on the growth of scientific knowledge have inspired historians, sociologists, and some philosophers to contend that scientific objectivity is a myth. In this book, Kitcher attempts to resurrect the notions of objectivity and progress in science by identifying both the limitations of idealized treatments of growth of knowledge and the overreactions to philosophical idealizations. Recognizing that science is done not by logically omniscient subjects working in isolation, but by people with a variety of personal (...)
  36. Steven P. R. Rose & Lisa Appignanesi (eds.) (1986). Science and Beyond. B. Blackwell in Association with the Institute of Contemporary Arts.
  37. Joseph Grünfeld (1973). Science and Values. Amsterdam,Grüner.
    HISTORICAL INSIGHT METAHISTORY The term 'history' stands for past human events, their record and the process or technique of making the record. ...
  38. R. Stephen White (1999). Why Science? Kroshka.
  39. Michael Specter (2009). Denialism: How Irrational Thinking Hinders Scientific Progress, Harms the Planet, and Threatens Our Lives. Penguin Press.
    Vioxx and the fear of science -- Vaccines and the great denial -- The organic fetish -- The era of echinacea -- Race and the language of life -- Surfing the exponential.
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  40. Lynette Hunter (1999). Critiques of Knowing: Situated Textualities in Science, Computing, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Critiques of Knowing explores what happens to science and computing when we think of them as texts. Lynette Hunter elegantly weaves together such vast areas of thought as rhetoric, politics, AI, computing, feminism, science studies, aesthetics and epistemology. This book shows us that what we need is a radical shake-up of approaches to the arts if the critiques of science and computing are to come to any fruition.
  41. Enrico Bellone (1980). A World on Paper: Studies on the Second Scientific Revolution. Mit Press.
  42. A. P. Simonds (1978). Karl Mannheim's Sociology of Knowledge. Clarendon Press.
  43. John Krige (1980). Science, Revolution, and Discontinuity. Humanities Press.
  44. J. M. Ziman (1978). Reliable Knowledge: An Exploration of the Grounds for Belief in Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Why believe in the findings of science? John Ziman argues that scientific knowledge is not uniformly reliable, but rather like a map representing a country we cannot visit. He shows how science has many elements, including alongside its experiments and formulae the language and logic, patterns and preconceptions, facts and fantasies used to illustrate and express its findings. These elements are variously combined by scientists in their explanations of the material world as it lies outside our everyday experience. John Ziman’s (...)
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  45. Henry John Steffens & H. N. Muller (eds.) (1974). Science, Technology, and Culture. New York,Ams Press.
  46. P. Kyle Stanford (2006). Exceeding Our Grasp: Science, History, and the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives. Oxford University Press.
    The incredible achievements of modern scientific theories lead most of us to embrace scientific realism: the view that our best theories offer us at least roughly accurate descriptions of otherwise inaccessible parts of the world like genes, atoms, and the big bang. In Exceeding Our Grasp, Stanford argues that careful attention to the history of scientific investigation invites a challenge to this view that is not well represented in contemporary debates about the nature of the scientific enterprise. The historical record (...)
  47. Alan H. Cromer (1993). Uncommon Sense: The Heretical Nature of Science. Oxford University Press.
    Most people believe that science arose as a natural end-product of our innate intelligence and curiosity, as an inevitable stage in human intellectual development. But physicist and educator Alan Cromer disputes this belief. Cromer argues that science is not the natural unfolding of human potential, but the invention of a particular culture, Greece, in a particular historical period. Indeed, far from being natural, scientific thinking goes so far against the grain of conventional human thought that if it hadn't been discovered (...)
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  48. Karl R. Popper (1994). The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality. Routledge.
    In a career spanning sixty years, Sir Karl Popper has made some of the most important contributions to the twentieth century discussion of science and rationality. The Myth of the Framework is a new collection of some of Popper's most important material on this subject. Sir Karl discusses such issues as the aims of science, the role that it plays in our civilization, the moral responsibility of the scientist, the structure of history, and the perennial choice between reason and revolution. (...)
  49. R. G. A. Dolby (1996). Uncertain Knowledge: An Image of Science for a Changing World. Cambridge University Press.
    What is science? How is scientific knowledge affected by the society that produces it? Does scientific knowledge directly correspond to reality? Can we draw a line between science and pseudo-science? Will it ever be possible for computers to undertake scientific investigation independently? Is there such a thing as feminist science? In this book the author addresses questions such as these using a technique of 'cognitive play', which creates and explores new links between the ideas and results of contemporary history, philosophy, (...)
  50. James S. Perlman (1995). Science Without Limits: Toward a Theory of Interaction Between Nature and Knowledge. Prometheus Books.
  51. 1 — 50 / 261