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  1. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  2. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  3. John P. Wright (1983). The Sceptical Realism of David Hume. Manchester Up.
    Introduction A brief look at the competing present-day interpretations of Hume's philosophy will leave the uninitiated reader completely baffled. On the one hand , Hume is seen as a philosopher who attempted to analyse concepts with ...
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  4. Norman Stockman (1983). Antipositivist Theories of the Sciences: Critical Rationalism, Critical Theory, and Scientific Realism. Sold and Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by Kluwer.
  5. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  6. Barry Gholson (ed.) (1989). Psychology of Science: Contributions to Metascience. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive view of the work of scholars in several different disciplines contributing to the development of the psychology of science. This new field of inquiry is a systematic elaboration and application of psychological concepts and methods to clarify the nature of the scientific enterprise. While the psychology of science overlaps the philosophy, history, and sociology of science in important ways, its predominant focus is on individuals and small groups, rather than broad social institutions and concepts. The (...)
  7. Raymond John Seeger & R. S. Cohen (eds.) (1974). Philosophical Foundations of Science: Proceedings of Section L, 1969, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Reidel.
  8. Robert L. Wolke (ed.) (1975). Impact, Science on Society. Saunders.
  9. Charles Cooper (ed.) (1972/1973). Science, Technology and Development. London,F. Cass.
    Science, Technology and Production in the Underdeveloped Countries: An Introduction By Charles Cooper* The uncritical notion that it would be easy to orient ...
  10. Daniel Rothbart (1998). Science, Reason, and Reality: Issues in the Philosophy of Science. Harcourt Brace College Publishers.
  11. Renée Weber (ed.) (1986). Dialogues with Scientists and Sages: The Search for Unity. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  12. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  13. Karl R. Popper (1959/1992). The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Routledge.
    Described by the philosopher A.J. Ayer as a work of 'great originality and power', this book revolutionized contemporary thinking on science and knowledge. Ideas such as the now legendary doctrine of 'falsificationism' electrified the scientific community, influencing even working scientists, as well as post-war philosophy. This astonishing work ranks alongside The Open Society and Its Enemies as one of Popper's most enduring books and contains insights and arguments that demand to be read to this day.
  14. Ruth Bleier (ed.) (1986). Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press.
  15. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  16. Evelyn Fox Keller (1992). Secrets of Life, Secrets of Death: Essays on Language, Gender, and Science. Routledge.
    The essays included here represent Fox Keller's attempts to integrate the insights of feminist theory with those of her contemporaries in the history and philosophy of science.
  17. J. M. Ziman (1981). Puzzles, Problems, and Enigmas: Occasional Pieces on the Human Aspects of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    A discussion of the human side of science, originally published in 1981.
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  18. Alexander Bird (1998). Philosophy of Science. University College London Press.
    The third volume in McGill-Queen's University Press's Fundamentals of Philosophy series, Philosophy of Science is an engaging and accessible introduction to the main themes of contemporary philosophy of science.
  19. Craig Dilworth (1994/1986). Scientific Progress: A Study Concerning the Nature of the Relation Between Successive Scientific Theories. Kluwer Academic.
    In this way Dilworth succeeds in providing a conception of science in which scientific progress is based on both rational and empirical considerations.
  20. Larry Laudan (1984). Science and Values: The Aims of Science and Their Role in Scientific Debate. University of California Press.
  21. E. Doyle McCarthy (1996). Knowledge as Culture: The New Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge.
    Drawing upon Marxist, French structuralist and American pragmatist traditions, this lively and accessible introduction to the sociology of knowledge gives to its classic texts a fresh reading, arguing that various bodies of knowledge operate within culture to create powerful cultural dispositions, meanings, and categories. It looks at the cultural impact of the forms and images of mass media, the authority of science, medicine, and law as bodies of contemporary knowledge and practice. Finally, it considers the concept of "engendered knowledge" through (...)
  22. J. Leplin (ed.) (1984). Scientific Realism. University of California.
    Introduction Jarrett Leplin Hilary Putnam seems to have inaugurated a new era of interest in realism with his declaration that realism is the ...
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  23. Husain Sarkar (2007). Group Rationality in Scientific Research. Cambridge University Press.
  24. J. E. McGuire (2000). Science Unfettered: A Philosophical Study in Sociohistorical Ontology. Ohio University Press.
    As a result, the works of Popper, Kuhn, Quine, and Lakatos, as well as Heidegger, Gadamer, Nietzsche, Foucault, and Feyerabend, are called into play.
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  25. Paul Artin Boghossian (2006). Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism. Oxford University Press.
    Relativist and constructivist conceptions of truth and knowledge have become orthodoxy in vast stretches of the academic world in recent times. In his long-awaited first book, Paul Boghossian critically examines such views and exposes their fundamental flaws. Boghossian focuses on three different ways of reading the claim that knowledge is socially constructed--one as a thesis about truth and two about justification. And he rejects all three. The intuitive, common-sense view is that there is a way the world is that is (...)
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  26. Nicholas Jardine (1986). The Fortunes of Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    The belief that science shows an accumulation of a body of objective knowledge has been widely challenged by philosophers and historians in the latter half of this century. In this treatise, Dr. Jardine defends this belief with a careful appreciation of the complexities involved, drawing on many controversial issues concerning truth in science, interpretation of past theories, and grounds of scientific method.
  27. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  28. Ian Hacking (ed.) (1981). Scientific Revolutions. Oxford University Press.
    Bringing together important writings not easily available elsewhere, this volume provides a convenient and stimulating overview of recent work in the philosophy of science. The contributors include Paul Feyerabend, Ian Hacking, T.S. Kuhn, Imre Lakatos, Laurens Laudan, Karl Popper, Hilary Putnam, and Dudley Shapere. In addition, Hacking provides an introductory essay and a selective bibliography.
  29. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
  30. E. B. Davies (2003). Science in the Looking Glass: What Do Scientists Really Know? Oxford University Press.
    In this wide-ranging book, Brian Davies discusses the basis for scientists' claims to knowledge about the world. He looks at science historically, emphasizing not only the achievements of scientists from Galileo onwards, but also their mistakes. He rejects the claim that all scientific knowledge is provisional, by citing examples from chemistry, biology and geology. A major feature of the book is its defense of the view that mathematics was invented rather than discovered. A large number of examples are used to (...)
  31. Bentley Glass (1965/1981). Science and Ethical Values. Greenwood Press.
  32. Roy Wallis (ed.) (1979). On the Margins of Science: The Social Construction of Rejected Knowledge. University of Keele.
  33. Janny Groen, Eefke Smit & Juurd Eijsvoogel (eds.) (1990). The Discipline of Curiosity: Science in the World. Elsevier Science.
  34. Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  35. David F. Horrobin (1969). Science is God. Aylesbury (Bucks.),Medical and Technical Publishing.
  36. Paul Feyerabend (1974/1975). Against Method: Outline of an Anarchistic Theory of Knowledge. Humanities Press.
  37. James Ladyman (2002). Understanding Philosophy of Science. Routledge.
    Without scientific theory, the technology developments of recent years would not have been possible. In this exceptionally clear and engaging introduction to philosophy of science, James Ladyman explores the scope of natural science and its implications for human life. With the focus firmly upon realism, he discusses how fundamental philosophical questions can be answered by science and how scientific theory can confirm and inform our basic and intrinsic knowledge.
  38. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
  39. Henry John Steffens & H. N. Muller (eds.) (1974). Science, Technology, and Culture. New York,Ams Press.
  40. Richard B. Braithwaite (1953). Scientific Explanation. Cambridge University Press.
  41. James Bryant Conant (1982/1983). Modern Science and Modern Man. Greenwood Press.
  42. Jacques Jérôme Pierre Maquet (1951/1973). The Sociology of Knowledge, its Structure and its Relation to the Philosophy of Knowledge. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  43. John F. W. Herschel (1830/1987). A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
  44. John Krige (1980). Science, Revolution, and Discontinuity. Humanities Press.
  45. Ryan D. Tweney, Michael E. Doherty & Clifford R. Mynatt (eds.) (1981). On Scientific Thinking. Columbia University Press.
  46. Joseph Margolis (1987). Science Without Unity: Reconciling the Human and Natural Sciences. Blackwell.
  47. Peter H. Hare (1975). Causing, Perceiving, and Believing: An Examination of the Philosophy of C. J. Ducasse. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  48. J. M. Ziman (1978). Reliable Knowledge: An Exploration of the Grounds for Belief in Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Why believe in the findings of science? John Ziman argues that scientific knowledge is not uniformly reliable, but rather like a map representing a country we cannot visit. He shows how science has many elements, including alongside its experiments and formulae the language and logic, patterns and preconceptions, facts and fantasies used to illustrate and express its findings. These elements are variously combined by scientists in their explanations of the material world as it lies outside our everyday experience. John Ziman’s (...)
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  49. Colin Howson (ed.) (1976). Method and Appraisal in the Physical Sciences: The Critical Background to Modern Science, 1800-1905. Cambridge University Press.
    Lakatos, I. History of science and its rational reconstructions.--Clark, P. Atomism vs. thermodynamics.--Worrall, J. Thomas Young and the "rufutation" of Newtonian optics.--Musgrave, A. Why did oxygen supplant phlogiston?--Zahar, E. Why did Einstein's programme supersede Lorentz's?--Frické, M. The rejection of Avogadro's hypotheses.--Feyerabend, P. On the critique of scientific reason.
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  50. Alan H. Cromer (1993). Uncommon Sense: The Heretical Nature of Science. Oxford University Press.
    Most people believe that science arose as a natural end-product of our innate intelligence and curiosity, as an inevitable stage in human intellectual development. But physicist and educator Alan Cromer disputes this belief. Cromer argues that science is not the natural unfolding of human potential, but the invention of a particular culture, Greece, in a particular historical period. Indeed, far from being natural, scientific thinking goes so far against the grain of conventional human thought that if it hadn't been discovered (...)
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