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1 — 50 / 368
  1. Tom W. Goff (1980). Marx and Mead: Contributions to a Sociology of Knowledge. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  2. James E. Curtis (1970). The Sociology of Knowledge: A Reader. London,Duckworth.
  3. Ruth Bleier (ed.) (1986). Feminist Approaches to Science. Pergamon Press.
  4. Roy Wallis (ed.) (1979). On the Margins of Science: The Social Construction of Rejected Knowledge. University of Keele.
  5. Norman Stockman (1983). Antipositivist Theories of the Sciences: Critical Rationalism, Critical Theory, and Scientific Realism. Sold and Distributed in the U.S.A. And Canada by Kluwer.
  6. Paul Weingartner & Gerhard Zecha (eds.) (1970). Induction, Physics, and Ethics. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    INITIAL PROBABILITIES: A PREREQUISITE FOR ANY VALID INDUCTION* * I. INDUCTIVE REASONING AND ITS UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS Experience does not tell us anything ...
  7. René von Schomberg (ed.) (1993). Science, Politics, and Morality: Scientific Uncertainty and Decision Making. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Current environmental problems and technological risks are a challenge for a new institutional arrangement of the value spheres of Science, Politics and Morality. Distinguished authors from different European countries and America provide a cross-disciplinary perspective on the problems of political decision making under the conditions of scientific uncertainty. cases from biotechnology and the environmental sciences are discussed. The papers collected for this volume address the following themes: (i) controversies about risks and political decision making; (ii) concepts of science (...)
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  8. John Arthur Passmore (1978). Science and its Critics. Duckworth.
  9. John David North, John J. Roche & A. C. Crombie (eds.) (1985). The Light of Nature: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science Presented to A.C. Crombie. Distributors for the United States and Canada Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    INTRODUCTION This volume of essays is meant as a tribute to Alistair Crombie by some of those who have studied with him. The occasion of its publication is ...
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  10. Austen Clark (1980). Psychological Models and Neural Mechanisms: An Examination of Reductionism in Psychology. Oxford University Press.
  11. Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  12. Charles Cooper (ed.) (1972/1973). Science, Technology and Development. London,F. Cass.
    Science, Technology and Production in the Underdeveloped Countries: An Introduction By Charles Cooper* The uncritical notion that it would be easy to orient ...
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  13. Sidney Morgenbesser (1967). Philosophy of Science Today. New York, Basic Books.
    The nature and aim of science, by E. Nagel.--Truth and provability, by L. Henkin.--Completeness, by L. Henkin.--Computability, by S. C. Kleene.--Necessary truth, by W. V. Quine.--What is a scientific theory? By P. Suppes.--Science and simplicity, by N. Goodman.--Scientific explanation, by C. G. Hempel.--Observation and interpretation, by N. R. Hanson.--Probability and confirmation, by H. Putnam.--Utility and acceptance of hypotheses, by I. Levi.--Space and time, by A. Grünbaum.--Problems of microphysics, by P. Feyerabend.--Aspects of explanation in biological theory, by M. Beckner.--Psychologism and methodological (...)
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  14. Arie L. Molendijk & Peter Pels (eds.) (1998). Religion in the Making: The Emergence of the Sciences of Religion. Brill.
    This volume explores the ways in which religion became the object of scientific research in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
  15. Renée Weber (ed.) (1986). Dialogues with Scientists and Sages: The Search for Unity. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  16. Carl R. Kordig (1971). The Justification of Scientific Change. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    Based on author's dissertation--Yale University.
  17. Jennifer Trusted (1987). Inquiry and Understanding: An Introduction to Explanation in the Physical and Human Sciences. Macmillan Education.
  18. Nicholas Jardine (1986). The Fortunes of Inquiry. Oxford University Press.
    The belief that science shows an accumulation of a body of objective knowledge has been widely challenged by philosophers and historians in the latter half of this century. In this treatise, Dr. Jardine defends this belief with a careful appreciation of the complexities involved, drawing on many controversial issues concerning truth in science, interpretation of past theories, and grounds of scientific method.
  19. Marian Przełęcki (1969). The Logic of Empirical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  20. David F. Horrobin (1969). Science is God. Aylesbury (Bucks.),Medical and Technical Publishing.
  21. Joseph Margolis (1987). Science Without Unity: Reconciling the Human and Natural Sciences. Blackwell.
  22. Roddey Reid & Sharon Traweek (eds.) (2000). Doing Science + Culture. Routledge.
    Doing Science + Culture is a groundbreaking book on the cultural study of science, technology and medicine. Outstanding contributors including life and physical scientists, anthropologists, sociologists, literature/communication scholars and historians of science who focus on the analysis of science and scientific discourses within culture: what it means to "do" science. The essays are organized into three broad topics: transnational science and globalization (the movements of people, material resources and knowledges that underwrite scientific practices within and across borders of nation-states and (...)
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  23. Peter Achinstein (1991). Particles and Waves: Historical Essays in the Philosophy of Science. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together eleven essays by the distinguished philosopher of science, Peter Achinstein. The unifying theme is the nature of the philosophical problems surrounding the postulation of unobservable entities such as light waves, molecules, and electrons. How, if at all, is it possible to confirm scientific hypotheses about "unobservables"? Achinstein examines this question as it arose in actual scientific practice in three nineteenth-century episodes: the debate between particle and wave theorists of light, Maxwell's kinetic theory of gases, and J.J. (...)
  24. Peter H. Hare (1975). Causing, Perceiving, and Believing: An Examination of the Philosophy of C. J. Ducasse. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  25. Jerome R. Ravetz (1990). The Merger of Knowledge with Power: Essays in Critical Science. Mansell.
  26. Karl R. Popper (1959/1992). The Logic of Scientific Discovery. Routledge.
    Described by the philosopher A.J. Ayer as a work of 'great originality and power', this book revolutionized contemporary thinking on science and knowledge. Ideas such as the now legendary doctrine of 'falsificationism' electrified the scientific community, influencing even working scientists, as well as post-war philosophy. This astonishing work ranks alongside The Open Society and Its Enemies as one of Popper's most enduring books and contains insights and arguments that demand to be read to this day.
  27. Glenn Pearce & Patrick Maynard (eds.) (1973). Conceptual Change. Boston,D. Reidel.
  28. Henry Ely Kyburg (1990). Science & Reason. Oxford University Press.
    In this work Henry Kyburg presents his views on a wide range of philosophical problems associated with the study and practice of science and mathematics. The main structure of the book consists of a presentation of Kyburg's notions of epistemic probability and its use in the scientific enterprise i.e., the effort to modify previously adopted beliefs in the light of experience. Intended for cognitive scientists and people in artificial intelligence as well as for technically oriented philosophers, the book also provides (...)
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  29. Richard Swinburne (ed.) (1974). The Justification of Induction. New York: Oxford University Press.
  30. Janet Wolff (1975). Hermeneutic Philosophy and the Sociology of Art: An Approach to Some of the Epistemological Problems of the Sociology of Knowledge and the Sociology of Art and Literature. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
  31. Joseph Grünfeld (1973). Science and Values. Amsterdam,Grüner.
    HISTORICAL INSIGHT METAHISTORY The term 'history' stands for past human events, their record and the process or technique of making the record. ...
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  32. Nicholas Maxwell (1998). The Comprehensibility of the Universe: A New Conception of Science. Oxford University Press.
    This book puts forth a radically new conception of science. Maxwell argues that the prevailing view of the relation between scientific theory and evidence is untenable; he calls for a new orthodoxy that sees science as making a hierarchy of assumptions about the comprehensibility of the universe. This new conception has significant implications for both philosophy and science, promises to heal the rift between the two, and will be essential reading for people working in both fields.
  33. Richard Schlegel (1967). Completeness in Science. New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts.
  34. Paul Kurtz & Tim Madigan (eds.) (1994). Challenges to the Enlightenment: In Defense of Reason and Science. Prometheus Books.
  35. Nicholas Jardine (1991). The Scenes of Inquiry: On the Reality of Questions in the Sciences. Oxford University Press.
    This book advocates a radical shift of concern in philosophical, historical, and sociological studies of the sciences, and explores the consequences of such a shift. The historically-oriented first part of the work deals with the ways in which ranges of questions become real and cease to be real for communities of inquirers. The more philosophically-oriented second part of the work introduces the notion of absolute reality of questions, and addresses doubt about the claims of the sciences to have accumulated absolutely (...)
  36. Raymond John Seeger & R. S. Cohen (eds.) (1974). Philosophical Foundations of Science: Proceedings of Section L, 1969, American Association for the Advancement of Science. Reidel.
  37. Paul M. McNeill (1993). The Ethics and Politics of Human Experimentation. Cambridge University Press.
    This book focuses on experimentation that is carried out on human beings, including medical research, drug research and research undertaken in the social sciences. It discusses the ethics of such experimentation and asks the question: who defends the interests of these human subjects and ensures that they are not harmed? The author finds that ethical research depends on the adequacy of review by committee. Indeed most countries now rely on research ethics committees for the protection of the interests of the (...)
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  38. Jarrett Leplin (1997). A Novel Defense of Scientific Realism. Oxford University Press.
    Leplin attempts to reinstate the common sense idea that theoretical knowledge is achievable, indeed that its achievement is part of the means to progress in empirical knowledge. He sketches the genesis of the skeptical position, then introduces his argument for Minimalist Scientific Realism -- the requirement that novel predicitons be explained, and the claim that only realism about scientific theories can explain the importance of novel prediction.
  39. Erwin Chargaff (1977). Voices in the Labyrinth: Nature, Man, and Science. Seabury Press.
  40. Tord H. Ganelius (ed.) (1986). Progress in Science and its Social Conditions: Nobel Symposium 58, Held at Lidingö, Sweden, 15-19 August 1983. Published for the Nobel Foundation by Pergamon Press.
  41. Wolfgang Krohn, Edwin T. Layton & Peter Weingart (eds.) (1978). The Dynamics of Science and Technology: Social Values, Technical Norms, and Scientific Criteria in the Development of Knowledge. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
  42. Robert E. Butts & James Robert Brown (eds.) (1989). Constructivism and Science: Essays in Recent German Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  43. Alan Irwin & Brian Wynne (eds.) (1996). Misunderstanding Science?: The Public Reconstruction of Science and Technology. Cambridge University Press.
    Misunderstanding Science? offers a challenging new perspective on the public understanding of science. In so doing, it also challenges existing ideas of the nature of science and its relationships with society. Its analysis and case presentation are highly relevant to current concerns over the uptake, authority, and effectiveness of science as expressed, for example, in areas such as education, medical/health practice, risk and the environment, technological innovation. Based on several in-depth case-studies, and informed theoretically by the sociology of scientific knowledge, (...)
  44. Paul Thagard (1992). Conceptual Revolutions. Princeton University Press.
    In this path-breaking work, Paul Thagard draws on history and philosophy of science, cognitive psychology, and the field of artificial intelligence to develop a ...
  45. Kevin Christopher Elliott (2010). Is a Little Pollution Good for You?: Incorporating Societal Values in Environmental Research. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : societal values and environmental research -- The Hormesis case -- An argument for societal values in policy-relevant research -- Lesson #1 : safeguarding science -- Lesson #2 : diagnosing deliberation -- Lesson #3 : ethics for experts -- The MCS and ED cases.
  46. Alfred I. Tauber (ed.) (1997). Science and the Quest for Reality. New York University Press.
    Since Galileo, critics have waged a relentless assault against science, attacking it as dehumanizing, reductionist, relativistic, dominating, and imperialistic. Supporters meanwhile view science as synonymous with modernity and progress. The current debates over the role of science-- described by such headlines as Scientists are Urged to Fight Back Against `Politically Correct' Critics in The Chronicle of Higher Education--testify to how deeply divided we remain about the values and responsibilities of science in the modern age. Acknowledging the validity of a deep (...)
  47. James Bryant Conant (1982/1983). Modern Science and Modern Man. Greenwood Press.
  48. Jon Elster (1983). Explaining Technical Change: A Case Study in the Philosophy of Science. Universitetsforlaget.
    In this volume, first published in 1983, Jon Elster approaches the study of technical change from an epistemological perspective.
  49. Tadeusz Czeżowski (2000). Knowledge, Science, and Values: A Program for Scientific Philosophy. Rodopi.
    INTRODUCTION The present volume offers a selection of papers written by Tadeusz Czezowski. one of the most prominent representatives of the Lvov-Warsaw ...
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  50. Holmes Rolston, Iii (1999). Genes, Genesis, and God: Values and Their Origins in Natural and Human History. Cambridge University Press.
    Holmes Rolston challenges the sociobiological orthodoxy that would naturalize science, ethics, and religion. The book argues that genetic processes are not blind, selfish, and contingent, and that nature is therefore not value-free. The author examines the emergence of complex biodiversity through evolutionary history. Especially remarkable in this narrative is the genesis of human beings with their capacities for science, ethics, and religion. A major conceptual task of the book is to relate cultural genesis to natural genesis. There is also a (...)
  51. 1 — 50 / 368