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1 — 50 / 721
  1. Henry Sidgwick (1905/1996). Lectures on the Philosophy of Kant. Thoemmes Press.
  2. Louis Joseph Halle (1972). The Ideological Imagination: Ideological Conflict in Our Time and its Roots in Hobbes, Rousseau and Marx. Quadrangle Books.
  3. Harry G. Frankfurt (1976). Leibniz: A Collection of Critical Essays. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Broad, C. D. Leibniz's predicate-in-notion principle and some of its alleged consequences.--Couturat, L. On Leibniz's metaphysics.--Friedrich, C. J. Philosophical reflections of Leibniz on law, politics, and the state.--Curley, E. M. The root of contingency. Furth, M. Monadology.--Hacking, I. Individual substance.--Hintikka, J. Leibniz on plenitude, relations, and the "reign of law."--Ishiguro, H. Leibniz's theory of the ideality of relations.--Kneale, M. Leibniz and Spinoza on activity.--Koyré, A. Leibniz and Newton.--Lovejoy, A. O. Plenitude and sufficient reason in Leibniz and Spinoza.--Mates, B. Leibniz on (...)
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  4. Craig Walton & P. J. Johnson (eds.) (1987). Hobbes's 'Science of Natural Justice'. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  5. Eduardo Giannetti Fonsecdaa (1991). Beliefs in Action: Economic Philosophy and Social Change. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is concerned with the role of economic philosophy ("ideas") in the processes of belief-formation and social change. Its aim is to further our understanding of the behavior of the individual economic agent by bringing to light and examining the function of non-rational dispositions and motivations ("passions") in the determination of the agent's beliefs and goals. Drawing on the work of David Hume and Adam Smith, the book spells out the particular ways in which the passions come to affect (...)
  6. Richard J. Brook (1973). Berkeley's Philosophy of Science. The Hague,M. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION Philonous: You see, Hylas, the water of yonder fountain, how it is forced upwards, in a round column, to a certain height, at which it breaks ...
  7. Steven M. Cahn (ed.) (2002). Classics of Political and Moral Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Classics of Political and Moral Philosophy provides in one volume the major writings from nearly 2,500 years of political and moral philosophy. The most comprehensive collection of its kind, it moves from classical thought (Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Cicero) through medieval views (Augustine, Aquinas) to modern perspectives (Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Adam Smith, Kant). It includes major nineteenth-century thinkers (Hegel, Bentham, Mill, Nietzsche) as well as twentieth-century theorists (Rawls, Nozick, Nagel, Foucault, Habermas, Nussbaum). Also included are numerous essays from (...)
  8. G. A. J. Rogers (ed.) (1994). Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press.
    Three hundred years after his major publications, John Locke remains one of the most potent philosophical influences in the world today. His epistemology has become embedded in our everyday presumptions about the world, and his political theory lies at the heart of the liberal democratic state. This collection by a distinguished international group of scholars looks both at core areas of Locke's philosophy and political theory and at areas not usually discussed--the links between Locke's philosophy and his religious and political (...)
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  9. James Daniel Collins (1972). Interpreting Modern Philosophy. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
  10. Nathan Rotenstreich (1979). Practice and Realization: Studies in Kant's Moral Philosophy. M. Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER ONE FREEDOM, ACTION AND DEEDS It is an established fact that Kant's theory of deeds or acts can ultimately be equaled with his ethical theory. ...
  11. Patricia Springborg (2005). Mary Astell: Theorist of Freedom From Domination. Cambridge University Press.
    Philosopher, theologian, educational theorist, feminist and political pamphleteer, Mary Astell was an important figure in the history of ideas of the early modern period. Among the first systematic critics of John Locke's entire corpus, she is best known for the famous question which prefaces her Reflections on Marriage: 'If all men are born free, how is it that all women are born slaves?' She is claimed by modern Republican theorists and feminists alike but, as a Royalist High Church Tory, the (...)
  12. Jonathan Marks (2005). Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Cambridge University Press.
    In Perfection and Disharmony in the Thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Jonathan Marks offers a new interpretation of the philosopher's thought and its place in the contemporary debate between liberals and communitarians. Against prevailing views, he argues that Rousseau's thought revolves around the natural perfection of a naturally disharmonious being. At the foundation of Rousseau's thought he finds a natural teleology that takes account of and seeks to harmonize conflicting ends. The Rousseau who emerges from this interpretation is a radical critic (...)
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  13. M. Weitz (1988). Theories of Concepts: A History of the Major Philosophical Traditions. Routledge.
  14. Jean S. Yolton (1998). John Locke: A Descriptive Bibliography. Thoemmes Press.
  15. J. H. Brumfitt (1972). The French Enlightenment. London,Macmillan.
  16. Paul A. Swift (2005). Becoming Nietzsche: Early Reflections on Democritus, Schopenhauer, and Kant. Lexington Books.
    Introduction: how one becomes what one is -- Teleology and the legend of Democritus -- Nietzsche on Schopenhauer in 1867 -- The end of teleology -- Conclusion: aesthetic of becoming.
  17. Rüdiger Bubner (2003). The Innovations of Idealism. Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in German in 1995, this collection of essays has been written by the foremost representative of the hermeneutical approach in German philosophy. Offering a novel interpretation of the tradition of German Idealist thought--Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel--RU;diger Bubner insightfully reviews the philosophical innovations in the complex of issues and aspirations which dominated German intellectual life from 1780 to 1830. This collection will be of special interest to students of German philosophy, literary theory and the history of ideas.
  18. T. C. Williams (1968). The Concept of the Categorical Imperative: A Study of the Place of the Categorical Imperative in Kant's Ethical Theory. Oxford, Clarendon P..
  19. Walter R. Ott (2003). Locke's Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines John Locke's claims about the nature and workings of language. Walter Ott proposes a new interpretation of Locke's thesis that words signify ideas in the mind of the speaker, and argues that rather than employing such notions as sense or reference, Locke relies on an ancient tradition that understands signification as reliable indication. He then uses this interpretation to explain crucial areas of Locke's metaphysics and epistemology, including essence, abstraction, knowledge, and mental representation. His discussion, which is (...)
  20. David Francis Pears (1990). Hume's System: An Examination of the First Book of His Treatise. Oxford University Press.
    In this compelling analysis David Pears examines the foundations of Hume's theory of the mind as presented in the first book of the Treatise. Past studies have tended to take one of two extreme views: that Hume relies exclusively on a theory of meaning, or that he relies exclusively on a theory of truth and evidence. Steering a middle course between these positions, Pears argues that Hume's theory of ideas serves both functions. He examines in detail its application to three (...)
  21. Henry M. Rosenthal (1989). The Consolations of Philosophy: Hobbes's Secret, Spinoza's Way. Temple University Press.
  22. John Locke (1977). The Locke Reader: Selections From the Works of John Locke: With a General Introd. And Commentary. Cambridge University Press.
    Yolton's introduction and commentary explicate Locke's doctrines and provide the reader with the general background knowledge of other seventeenth-century ...
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  23. Jonathan Harrison (1976). Hume's Moral Epistemology. Clarendon Press.
  24. Anthony Savile (2000). Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Leibniz and the Monadology. Routledge.
    Anthony Savile clearly identifies the intellectual assumptions that underlie Leibniz's thought and locates the text within Leibniz's larger philosophical ...
  25. Charles J. McCracken & I. C. Tipton (eds.) (2000). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues: Background Source Materials. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume sets Berkeley's philosophy in its historical context by providing selections from: firstly, works that deeply influenced Berkeley as he formed his main doctrines; secondly, works that illuminate the philosophical climate in which those doctrines were formed; and thirdly, works that display Berkeley's subsequent philosophical influence. The first category is represented by selections from Descartes, Malebranche, Bayle, and Locke; the second category includes extracts from such thinkers as Regius, Lanion, Arnauld, Lee, and Norris; while reactions to Berkeley, both positive (...)
  26. Robert James Nelson (1981). Pascal, Adversary and Advocate. Harvard University Press.
  27. Bernard M. G. Reardon (1988). Kant as Philosophical Theologian. Barnes & Noble.
  28. George Croom Robertson (1910/1970). Hobbes. St. Clair Shores, Mich.,Scholarly Press.
    H 0 B B E S. CHAPTEE I. YOUTH — OXFORD (-). Three names of English thinkers stand out before all others in the seventeenth century — Bacon, Hobbes, ...
  29. David Hume (1745/1967). A Letter From a Gentleman to His Friend in Edinburgh (1745). Edinburgh, Edinburgh U.P..
  30. Anthony J. Cascardi (1992). The Subject of Modernity. Cambridge University Press.
    The question of modernity has provoked a vigorous debate in the work of thinkers from Hegel to Habermas. Our own self-styled postmodern age has seen no end to this debate, which now receives a major and wide-ranging intervention from the theorist and critic Anthony J. Cascardi. Offering an historical account of the origins and transformations of the rational subject or self as it is represented in Descartes, Cervantes, Pascal, Hobbes and the Don Juan myth, he carries his argument across the (...)
  31. Gabriel Moked (1988). Particles And Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy. Clarendon Press.
    Demonstrating that in George Berkeley's last major work, Siris, Berkeley had converted to a belief in the usefulness of the concept and existence of minute particles, Moked here posits that Berkeley developed a highly original brand of corpuscularian physics.
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  32. Lawrence Pasternack (ed.) (2002). Immanuel Kant: Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, in Focus. Routledge.
    The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals is one of the most important works of moral philosophy ever written, and Kant's most widely read work. It attempts to demonstrate that morality has its foundation in reason and that our wills are free from both natural necessity and the power of desire. It is here that Kant sets out his famous and controversial "categorical imperative", which forms the basis of his moral theory. This book is an essential guide to the Groundwork (...)
  33. Benson Mates (1989). The Philosophy of Leibniz: Metaphysics and Language. Oup Usa.
    This is the first, and indeed the definitive systematic account of the wide-ranging philosophical ideas of Leibniz. The author, a highly respected analytical philosopher, has brought his own formidable abilities to bear on the unwieldy and inaccessible corpus of Leibniz's work.
  34. Scott Roulier (2004). Kantian Virtue at the Intersection of Politics and Nature: The Vale of Soul-Making. University of Rochester Press.
  35. C. D. Broad (1978). Kant: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.
  36. Thomas Hobbes (2005). A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student, of the Common Laws of England. Oxford University Press.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment "Questions relative to Hereditary Right," discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, the Dialogue should be essential reading for anybody interested in English political thought or legal theory. Cromartie has established when and why the work (...)
  37. Francis Bacon (1965). Francis Bacon: A Selection of His Works. Toronto,Macmillan of Canada.
  38. Lester G. Crocker (1974). Diderot's Chaotic Order. [Princeton, N.J.]Princeton University Press.
  39. Ian Hacking (1975). Why Does Language Matter to Philosophy? Cambridge University Press.
    Many people find themselves dissatisfied with recent linguistic philosophy, and yet know that language has always mattered deeply to philosophy and must in some sense continue to do so. Ian Hacking considers here some dozen case studies in the history of philosophy to show the different ways in which language has been important, and the consequences for the development of the subject. There are chapters on, among others, Hobbes, Berkeley, Russell, Ayer, Wittgenstein, Chomsky, Feyerabend and Davidson. Dr Hacking (...)
  40. Walter Soffer (1987). From Science to Subjectivity: An Interpretation of Descartes' Meditations. Greenwood Press.
  41. James Wiley (2012). Theory and Practice in the Philosophy of David Hume. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Hume and the problem of theory and practice in philosophy and political theory -- Hume's naturalism and skepticism in the treatise and his appeal from theory to practice -- The systematic theory of theory of the treatise of human nature -- The behaviorist theory of practice of the treatise -- The practical philosophies of skepticism and commercial humanism -- The common sense theory of theory of the enquiries, essays, and history of England -- The common sense theory of practice of (...)
  42. David Berman (2005). Berkeley and Irish Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.
    George Berkeley -- On missing the wrong target -- Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment in Irish philosophy -- The culmination and causation of Irish philosophy -- Francis Hutcheson on Berkeley and the Molyneux problem -- The impact of Irish philosophy on the American Enlightenment -- Irish ideology and philosophy -- An early essay concerning Berkeley's immaterialism -- Mrs. Berkeley's annotations in An account of the life of Berkeley (1776) -- Some new Bermuda Berkeleiana -- The good bishop : new letters -- Beckett (...)
  43. Seamus Deane (2005). Foreign Affections: Essays on Edmund Burke. University of Notre Dame Press in Association with Field Day.
  44. Frederick M. Keener (1983). The Chain of Becoming: The Philosophical Tale, the Novel, and a Neglected Realism of the Enlightenment: Swift, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Johnson, and Austen. Columbia University Press.
  45. Michael A. Slote (2001). Morals From Motives. Oxford University Press.
    Morals from Motives develops a virtue ethics inspired more by Hume and Hutcheson's moral sentimentalism than by recently-influential Aristotelianism. It argues that a reconfigured and expanded "morality of caring" can offer a general account of right and wrong action as well as social justice. Expanding the frontiers of ethics, it goes on to show how a motive-based "pure" virtue theory can also help us to understand the nature of human well-being and practical reason.
  46. Wayne I. Boucher (1999). Spinoza in English: A Bibliography From the Seventeenth Century to the Present, 2nd Edn. Thoemmes.
  47. Paul Lodge (ed.) (2004). Leibniz and His Correspondents. Cambridge, Uk ;Cambridge University Press.
    Unlike most of the other great philosophers, Leibniz never wrote a magnum opus, so his philosophical correspondence is essential for an understanding of his views. This collection of new essays by preeminent figures in the field of Leibniz scholarship is the most thorough account of Leibniz's philosophical correspondence available. It illuminates his philosophical views and pays due attention to the dialectical context in which the relevant passages from the letters occur.
  48. Geoffrey Bremner (1983). Order and Chance: The Pattern of Diderot's Thought. Cambridge University Press.
    This study discovers a pattern to Diderot's thinking, a fundamental dualism attributable largely to the attitudes and assumptions of the time and giving a common structure to his ideas and writing. Geoffrey Bremner draws widely on Diderot's works in studying his ideas on perception and action, aesthetics, ethics and politics, as well as his plays and fiction. The subtlety of the textual analysis and the analogies Dr Bremner draws provide a convincing and illuminating argument for his interpretation. He supports this (...)
  49. Steven M. Cahn (ed.) (2005). Ten Essential Texts in the Philosophy of Religion: Classics and Contemporary Issues. Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new approach to teaching the philosophy of religion, this anthology is organized around ten of the most widely read texts in the field. Presented in their entirety, these classics serve as a framework for a variety of accessible contemporary essays that are also included. The book's unique structure gives students the opportunity to study in depth complete historical works while also conveying a sense of how today's philosophers have explored related issues. Editor Steven M. Cahn has annotated each (...)
  50. Greg Hill (2006). Rousseau's Theory of Human Association: Transparent and Opaque Communities. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book examines Rousseau’s ideas about the natural transparency of human intention, the loss of this transparency in the opaque cities of Europe, and the possibility of its restoration within small republican communities. The author weaves together Rousseau’s provocative conjectures about transparency and opaqueness to provide an original interpretation of Rousseau’s political thought and its bearing on several contemporary controversies. He also argues that civic cooperation in Rousseau’s model republic requires mutual surveillance; that Hobbes’s argument for a sovereign state assumes (...)
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