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1 — 50 / 734
  1. Elisabeth Labrousse (1983). Bayle. Oxford University Press.
  2. Harry G. Frankfurt (1976). Leibniz: A Collection of Critical Essays. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Broad, C. D. Leibniz's predicate-in-notion principle and some of its alleged consequences.--Couturat, L. On Leibniz's metaphysics.--Friedrich, C. J. Philosophical reflections of Leibniz on law, politics, and the state.--Curley, E. M. The root of contingency. Furth, M. Monadology.--Hacking, I. Individual substance.--Hintikka, J. Leibniz on plenitude, relations, and the "reign of law."--Ishiguro, H. Leibniz's theory of the ideality of relations.--Kneale, M. Leibniz and Spinoza on activity.--Koyré, A. Leibniz and Newton.--Lovejoy, A. O. Plenitude and sufficient reason in Leibniz and Spinoza.--Mates, B. Leibniz on (...)
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  3. Norman Malcolm (1972). Problems of Mind: Descartes to Wittgenstein. London,Allen and Unwin.
  4. Frederick Vaughan (1972). The Political Philosophy of Giambattista Vico. The Hague,Nijhoff.
  5. Immanuel Kant (1968). Selected Pre-Critical Writings and Correspondence with Beck. New York, Barnes & Noble.
  6. Basil Willey (1940). The Eighteenth-Century Background: Studies on the Idea of Nature in the Thought of the Period. Harmondsworth,Penguin.
  7. V. C. Chappell (1968). Hume. Melbourne,Macmillan.
  8. Charles M. Sherover (1971). Heidegger, Kant and Time. University Press of America.
  9. José Ortega Y. Gasset (1971). The Idea of Principle in Leibnitz and the Evolution of Deductive Theory. W. W. Norton.
    This book, an exploration of the work of Leibnitz, is Ortega’s most systematic contribution to philosophy. Ortega begins with a detailed definition of a principle and with an examination of the specific principles formulated by Leibnitz. He goes on to examine Leibnitz. He goes on to examine Leibnitz’s complex and mercurial attitudes towards principles and discusses the effects of these attitudes on his philosophy and on contributions to mathematics and logic.
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  10. Nathan Rotenstreich (1979). Practice and Realization: Studies in Kant's Moral Philosophy. M. Nijhoff.
    CHAPTER ONE FREEDOM, ACTION AND DEEDS It is an established fact that Kant's theory of deeds or acts can ultimately be equaled with his ethical theory. ...
  11. D. J. O'Connor (1952). John Locke. Baltimore, Penguin Books.
  12. Thomas C. Vinci (1998). Cartesian Truth. Oxford University Press.
    This book argues that science and metaphysics are closely and inseparably interwoven in the work of Descartes, such that the metaphysics cannot be understood without the science and vice versa. In order to make his case, Thomas Vinci offers a careful philosophical reconstruction of central parts of Descartes' metaphysics and of his theory of perception, each considered in relation to Descartes' epistemology. Many authors of late have written on the relation between Descartes' metaphysics and his physics, especially insofar as the (...)
  13. Lewis White Beck (ed.) (1972). Proceedings of the Third International Kant Congress. Dordrecht,Reidel.
    DIE KANTLITERATUR 1965-1969 I. STATISTISCHE ÜBERSICHT Zu Beginn meiner Ausführungen möchte ich Ihnen einen kurzen Überblick über den Umfang und die ...
  14. Greg Hill (2006). Rousseau's Theory of Human Association: Transparent and Opaque Communities. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book examines Rousseau’s ideas about the natural transparency of human intention, the loss of this transparency in the opaque cities of Europe, and the possibility of its restoration within small republican communities. The author weaves together Rousseau’s provocative conjectures about transparency and opaqueness to provide an original interpretation of Rousseau’s political thought and its bearing on several contemporary controversies. He also argues that civic cooperation in Rousseau’s model republic requires mutual surveillance; that Hobbes’s argument for a sovereign state assumes (...)
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  15. Jean S. Yolton (1998). John Locke: A Descriptive Bibliography. Thoemmes Press.
  16. J. H. Brumfitt (1972). The French Enlightenment. London,Macmillan.
  17. Peter Gilmour (ed.) (1990). Philosophers of the Enlightenment. Barnes & Noble Books.
    PETER GILMOUR Introduction Although the nine philosophers in this volume can be described as Enlightenment philosophers (or, at least, as philosophers who ...
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  18. Cecilia Miller (1993). Giambattista Vico: Imagination and Historical Knowledge. Macmillan/St. Martin's Press.
    The theories of language and society of Giambattista Vico (1668-1744) are examined in this textual analysis of the full range of his theoretical writings, with special emphasis on his little-known early works. Vico's fundamental importance in the history of European ideas lies in his strong anti-Cartesian, anti-French and anti-Enlightenment views. In an age in which intellectuals adopted a rational approach, Vico stressed the nonrational element in man - in particular, imagination - as well as social and civil relationships, none of (...)
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  19. John Cottingham (ed.) (1998). Descartes. Oxford University Press.
    This volume brings together some of the best articles on Descartes published in the last fifty years. Edited by the renowned Descartes specialist John Cottingham, the selection covers the full range of Descartes's thought, including chapters on the central issues in Cartesian metaphysics, the relationship between mind and body, human nature and the passions, and the structure of scientific explanation.
  20. Robert J. Benton (1977). Kant's Second Critique and the Problem of Transcendental Arguments. M. Nijhoff.
    following list of abbreviations : Ethics — Lectures on Ethics GMM — Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals KrV — Critique of Pure Reason KU — Critique of ...
  21. Julia Ching & Willard Gurdon Oxtoby (eds.) (1992). Discovering China: European Interpretations in the Enlightenment. University of Rochester Press.
  22. Alexander Broadie (1990). The Tradition of Scottish Philosophy: A New Perspective on the Enlightenment. Barnes & Noble.
    Introduction The chief aim of this book is to give an account of two great periods in the history of Scottish culture. One is, inevitably, that of the ...
  23. Henry St John Bolingbroke (1977). The Philosophical Works, 1754-1777. Garland Pub..
  24. J. L. Mackie (1976). Problems From Locke. Clarendon Press.
    Annotation In this book Mr. Mackie selects for critical discussion six related topic which are prominent in John Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding: ...
  25. Robert James Nelson (1981). Pascal, Adversary and Advocate. Harvard University Press.
  26. Henning Jensen (1972). Motivation and the Moral Sense in Francis Hutcheson's Ethical Theory. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION HUTCHESONS LIFE AND WORKS The history of philosophy includes the names of many persons, famous in their time, whose contributions to human ...
  27. Nancy Sherman (1997). Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first to offer a detailed analysis of Aristotelian and Kantian ethics together, in a way that remains faithful to the texts and responsive to debates in contemporary ethics. Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that re-assessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves a (...)
  28. Frederick M. Keener (1983). The Chain of Becoming: The Philosophical Tale, the Novel, and a Neglected Realism of the Enlightenment: Swift, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Johnson, and Austen. Columbia University Press.
  29. Daniela Gobetti (1992). Private and Public: Individuals, Households, and Body Politic in Locke and Hutcheson. Routledge.
  30. Geivett R. Douglas & Sweetman Brendan (eds.) (1992). Contemporary Perspectives on Religious Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This unique textbook--the first to offer balanced, comprehensive coverage of all major perspectives on the rational justification of religious belief--includes twenty-four key papers by some of the world's leading philosophers of religion. Arranged in six sections, each representing a major approach to religious epistemology, the book begins with papers by noted atheists, setting the stage for the main theistic responses--Wittgensteinian Fideism, Reformed epistemology, natural theology, prudential accounts of religious beliefs, and rational belief based in religious experience--in each case offering a (...)
  31. John Arthur Passmore (1968). Hume's Intentions. New York, Basic Books.
    John Passmore was a renowned Australian empirical philosopher and historian of ideas. In this book, which was originally published in 1952, Passmore's intention was to disentangle certain main themes in Hume's philosophy and to show how they relate to Hume's main philosophic purpose. Rather than offering a detailed commentary, the text provides an account based on specificity and critical scholarship, seeking to complement the other more comprehensive works on Hume's philosophy that had become available around the same time. This book (...)
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  32. Gordon Graham (2004). Eight Theories of Ethics. Routledge/Taylor and Francis Group.
    Eight Theories of Ethics is a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental theories of ethics . Gordon Graham begins by introducing fundamental issues that underpin the concept of ethics, such as relativism and objectivity, before introducing eight major theories: * Egoism * Hedonism * Naturalism and Virtue Theory * Existentialism * Kantianism * Utilitarianism * Contractualism * Religion The author brings often abstract issues to life by drawing on examples from the great moral philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Mill, Nietzsche, Kant (...)
  33. Oliver Leaman (1995). Evil and Suffering in Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The problems of evil and suffering have been extensively discussed in Jewish philosophy, and much of the discussion has centred on the Book of Job. In this study Oliver Leaman poses two questions: how can a powerful and caring deity allow terrible things to happen to obviously innocent people, and why have the Jewish people been so harshly treated throughout history, given their status as the chosen people? He explores these issues through an analysis of the views of Philo, Saadya, (...)
  34. Onora O'Neill (2002). Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Why has autonomy been a leading idea in philosophical writing on bioethics, and why has trust been marginal? In this important book, Onora O'Neill suggests that the conceptions of individual autonomy so widely relied on in bioethics are philosophically and ethically inadequate, and that they undermine rather than support relations of trust. She shows how Kant's non-individualistic view of autonomy provides a stronger basis for an approach to medicine, science and biotechnology, and does not marginalize untrustworthiness, while also explaining why (...)
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  35. Nicholas Rescher (1979). Leibniz: An Introduction to His Philosophy. University Press of America.
  36. Jody S. Kraus (1993). The Limits of Hobbesian Contractarianism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the most comprehensive, rigorous critique of contemporary Hobbesian contractarianism as expounded in the work of Jean Hampton, Gregory Kavka, and David Gauthier. Professor Kraus argues that the attempts by these three philosophers to use Hobbes to answer current political and moral questions fail. The reasons why they fail are related to fundamental problems intrinsic to Hobbesian contractarianism: first, the problem of collective action arising out of the tension in Hobbes' theory between individual and collective rationality; second, the (...)
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  37. Charles Sherrard MacKenzie (1973). Pascal's Anguish and Joy. New York,Philosophical Library.
  38. T. E. Wilkerson (1976). Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: A Commentary for Students. Clarendon Press.
  39. Terry F. Godlove (1989). Religion, Interpretation, and Diversity of Belief: The Framework Model From Kant to Durkheim to Davidson. Cambridge University Press.
    Different religious traditions offer apparently very different pictures of the world. How are we to make sense of this radical diversity of religious belief? In this book, Professor Godlove argues that religions are alternative conceptual frameworks, the categories of which organise experience in diverse ways. He traces the history of this idea from Kant to Durkheim, and then proceeds to discuss two constraints on the diversity of all human judgment and belief: first that human experience is made possible by shared, (...)
  40. Peter Walmsley (1990). The Rhetoric of Berkeley's Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Whereas previous studies have made George Berkeley (1685-1753) the object of philosophical study, Peter Walmsley assesses Berkeley as a writer, offering rhetorical and literary analyses of Berkeley's four major philosophical texts, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, Alciphron, and Siris. Berkeley emerges from this study as an accomplished stylist who builds structures of affective imagery, creates dramatic voices in his texts, and masters the range of philosophical genres--the treatise, the dialogue, and the (...)
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  41. G. A. J. Rogers & Alan Ryan (eds.) (1988). Perspectives on Thomas Hobbes. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first in a series of occasional volumes of original papers on predefined themes. The Mind Association will nominate an editor or editors for each collection, and may join with other organizations in the promotion of conferences or other scholarly activities in connection with each volume. This collection, published to coincide with the 400th anniversary of Thomas Hobbes's birth, focuses on central themes in his life and work. Including essays by David Gauthier, Noel Malcolm, Arrigo Pacchi, David Raphael, (...)
  42. Henry Vyverberg (1989). Human Nature, Cultural Diversity, and the French Enlightenment. Oxford University Press.
    In this work, Henry Vyverberg traces the evolution and consequences of a crucial idea in French Enlightenment thought--the idea of human nature. Human nature was commonly seen as a broadly universal, unchanging entity, though perhaps modifiable by geographical, social, and historical factors. Enlightenment empiricism suggested a degree of cultural diversity that has often been underestimated in studies of the age. Evidence here is drawn from Diderot's celebrated Encyclopedia and from a vast range of writing by such Enlightenment notables as Voltaire, (...)
  43. John Charvet (1974). The Social Problem in the Philosophy of Rousseau. [Cambridge, Eng.]Cambridge University Press.
  44. Michael A. Slote (2001). Morals From Motives. Oxford University Press.
    Morals from Motives develops a virtue ethics inspired more by Hume and Hutcheson's moral sentimentalism than by recently-influential Aristotelianism. It argues that a reconfigured and expanded "morality of caring" can offer a general account of right and wrong action as well as social justice. Expanding the frontiers of ethics, it goes on to show how a motive-based "pure" virtue theory can also help us to understand the nature of human well-being and practical reason.
  45. Franco Venturi (1970). Utopia and Reform in the Enlightenment. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
  46. Francis Snare (1991). Morals, Motivation, and Convention: Hume's Influential Doctrines. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a book about the continuing influence of Hume's ideas on moral and political philosophy. In part, it is a critical exegesis of Hume's most impressive and challenging doctrines in Book III of the Treatise of Human Nature on such topics as morals, motivation, justice, and social institutions. However, the main thrust of the argument is to throw into relief the importance of that discussion for contemporary philosophy. While the author subjects most contemporary defenses of Humean doctrines to intense (...)
  47. Andrew Thomas Barnaby (2002). Literate Experience: The Work of Knowing in Seventeenth-Century English Writing. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Literate Experience argues for the existence of certain shared patterns of intellectual association in the English seventeenth century, patterns that follow the outlines of Bacon’s project of epistemological reform. Bacon’s project offered a theory of how knowing as a private act could be transformed into a public one, an act related to the creation and maintenance of public authority. The question thus becomes, how did thinkers in the period reimagine civil society as a polity of knowledge? This study traces out (...)
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  48. Cornelius Castoriadis (1991). Philosophy, Politics, Autonomy. Oxford University Press.
    These remarkable essays include Cornelius Castoriadis's latest contributions to philosophy, political and social theory, classical studies, development theory, cultural criticism, science, and ecology. Examining the "co-birth" in ancient Greece of philosophy and politics, Castoriadis shows how the Greeks' radical questioning of established ideas and institutions gave rise to the "project of autonomy". The "end of philosophy" proclaimed by Postmodernism would mean the end of this project. That end is now hastened by the lethal expansion of technoscience, the waning of political (...)
  49. John Locke (1971). Conduct of the Understanding. New York,B. Franklin.
  50. Fulton Henry Anderson (1948). The Philosophy of Francis Bacon. New York,Octagon Books.
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