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  1. William Ralph Schroeder (1984). Sartre and His Predecessors: The Self and the Other. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Introduction The common-sense assumptions about Others described in the Preface derive from a world-view which I shall call "The Cartesian Picture. ...
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  2. Paul M. Livingston (2004). Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Cambridge University Press.
    The problem of explaining consciousness today depends on the meaning of language: the ordinary language of consciousness in which we define and express our sensations, thoughts, dreams and memories. Paul Livingston argues that this contemporary problem arises from a quest that developed over the twentieth century, and that historical analysis provides new resources for understanding and resolving it. Accordingly, Livingston traces the application of characteristic practices of analytic philosophy to problems about the relationship of experience to linguistic meaning.
  3. Geoff Danaher (2000). Understanding Foucault. Sage Publications.
    Derided and disregarded by many of his contemporaries, Michel Foucault is now regarded as probably the most influential thinker of the twentieth century, his work is studied across the humanities and social sciences. Reading Foucault, however, can be a challenge, as can writing about him, but in Understanding Foucault, the authors offer an entertaining and informative introduction to his thinking. They cover all the issues Foucault dealt with, including power, knowledge, subjectivity and sexuality and discuss the development of his analysis (...)
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  4. Peter Koestenbaum (1978). The New Image of the Person: The Theory and Practice of Clinical Philosophy. Greenwood Press.
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  5. Jan M. Broekman (1974). Structuralism: Moscow, Prague, Paris. D. Reidel Pub. Co..
    THE STRUCTURALISTIC ENDEAVOUR. THE WORLD AS MUSICAL SCORE The recent decades of this century have witnessed unusually rapid and far- reaching changes in the ...
  6. István Mészáros (1979). The Work of Sartre. Humanities Press.
  7. Peter Osborne (ed.) (1996). A Critical Sense: Interviews with Intellectuals. Routledge.
    A Critical Sense brings together, in their own words, the leading figures of contemporary radical theory. Moving freely between philosophy, politics and cultural studies, this book offers a fascinating overview of the lines of thought of today's intellectual left. Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis and critical theory, literary studies, deconstruction, pragmatism, postcolonial and queer theory are discussed in a series of interviews from the journal Radical Philosophy . The intellectuals at the center of these debates are: Judith Butler, Cornelius Castoriadis, Drucilla Cornell, (...)
  8. Rosalyn Diprose (1994). The Bodies of Women: Ethics, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    In The Bodies of Women , Rosalyn Diprose argues that traditional approaches to ethics both perpetuate and remain blind to the mechanisms of the subordination of women. She shows that injustice against women begins in the ways that social discourses and practices place women's embodied existence as improper and secondary to men. She intervenes into debates about sexual difference, ethics, philosophies of the body and theories of self in order to develop a new ethics which places sexual difference at the (...)
  9. Philippa Berry & Andrew Wernick (eds.) (1992). Shadow of Spirit: Postmodernism and Religion. Routledge.
    By illuminating the striking affinity between the most innovative aspects of postmodern thought and religious mystical discourse, Shadow of Spirit challenges the long established assumption that western thought is committed to nihilism. This collection of essays by internationally recognized scholars explores the implications of the fascination with the "sacred," "divine" or "infinite" which characterizes much contemporary thought. It shows how these concerns have surfaced in the work of Derrida, Baudrillard, Lyotard, Kristeva, Irigaray and others. Examining the connection between this postmodern (...)
  10. Edith Kurzweil (1980). The Age of Structuralism: Lévi-Strauss to Foucault. Columbia University Press.
  11. Patrick L. Bourgeois (1990). Traces of Understanding: A Profile of Heidegger's and Ricoeur's Hermeneutics. Rodopi.
    CHAPTER ONE THE UNITY AND RUPTURE OF EXISTENCE The germ for Heidegger's quest to appropriate the entire Western tradition is given through a work which sets ...
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  12. Robert C. Solomon (1988). Continental Philosophy Since 1750: The Rise and Fall of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    The flowering of creative and speculative philosophy that emerged in modern Europe--particularly in Germany--is a thrilling adventure story as well as an essential chapter in the history of philosophy. In this integrative narrative, Solomon provides an accessible introduction to the major authors and movements of modern European philosophy, including the Enlightenment and Romanticism, Rousseau, German Idealism, Kant, Fichte, Schelling and the Romantics, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Feuerbach, Max Brentano, Meinong, Frege, Dilthey, Bergson, Nietzsche, Husserl, Freud, Wittgenstein, Heidegger, hermeneutics, Sartre, Postmodernism, Structuralism, (...)
  13. Paul Ricœur (1974). The Conflict of Interpretations. Northwestern University Press.
  14. Michael Scriven (1993). Sartre and the Media. St. Martin's Press.
  15. David Owen (1994). Maturity and Modernity: Nietzsche, Weber, Foucault, and the Ambivalence of Reason. Routledge.
    Maturity and Modernity examines Nietzsche, Weber and Foucault as a distinct trajectory of critical thinking within modern thought which traces the emergence and development of genealogy in the form of imminent critique. David Owen clarifies the relationship between these thinkers and responds to Habermas' (and Dews') charge that these thinkers are nihilists and that their approach is philosophically incoherent and practically irresponsible by showing how genealogy as a practical activity is directed toward the achievements of human autonomy. The scope of (...)
  16. C. Mantzavinos (2005). Naturalistic Hermeneutics. Cambridge University Press.
    Naturalistic Hermeneutics proposes the position of the unity of the scientific method and defends it against the claim to autonomy of the human sciences. Mantzavinos shows how materials that are 'meaningful', more specifically human actions and texts, can be adequately dealt with by the hypothetico-deductive method, the standard method used in the natural sciences. The hermeneutic method is not an alternative method aimed at the understanding and the interpretation of human actions and texts, but it is the same as the (...)
  17. Edward Fullbrook (1998). Simone De Beauvoir: A Critical Introduction. Polity Press.
  18. J. E. McGuire (2000). Science Unfettered: A Philosophical Study in Sociohistorical Ontology. Ohio University Press.
    As a result, the works of Popper, Kuhn, Quine, and Lakatos, as well as Heidegger, Gadamer, Nietzsche, Foucault, and Feyerabend, are called into play.
  19. Paul Roubiczek (1964). Existentialism for and Against. Cambridge [Eng.]University Press.
    In this book Roubiczek confronts the prevalent 'objective' method with the 'subjective' and attempts a proper balance between the objective and the personal, ...
  20. William Leon McBride (ed.) (1997). The Development and Meaning of Twentieth-Century Existentialism. Garland Pub..
    The Development and Meaning of Twentieth-Century Existentialism This volume recaptures, through the writings of figures already well-known in the mid-1940s, the coming-to-consciousness of the existentialist movement, along with early disagreements concerning its significance. The articles present various critics' shifting views of that significance and the movement's standing over subsequent decades. Despite the centrality of Sartre's thought to existentialism, these selections offer interestingly diverse perceptions of his place within the existentialist pantheon, along with varied interpretations of both the historical origins and (...)
  21. Simon Blackburn (2005). Truth: A Guide. Oxford University Press.
    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this (...)
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  22. Christopher Norris (1997). Against Relativism: Philosophy of Science, Deconstruction, and Critical Theory. Blackwell.
  23. Józef M. Bochenski (1972). Philosophy. New York,Harper & Row.
  24. John Daniel Wild (1979). The Challenge of Existentialism. Greenwood Press.
  25. Lorraine Y. Landry (2000). Marx and the Postmodernism Debates: An Agenda for Critical Theory. Praeger.
    This book is a meticulous argument for the contemporary value of Marx's democratic theory as an interpretive key for the postmodernism debates.
  26. Jana Sawicki (1991). Disciplining Foucault: Feminism, Power, and the Body. Routledge.
    Arguing that a Foucauldian feminism is possible, Sawicki rejects the view that the power of the phallocentric is total. Instead, like Foucault, she sees discouse as ambiguous and a source of conflict.
  27. Mathieu Deflem (ed.) (1996). Habermas, Modernity, and Law. Sage Publications.
    The work of Jürgen Habermas has long been regarded as central to the development of social and political theory and philosophy in the late 20th century. With the publication of his latest book Between Facts and Norms, Habermas has signalled the importance of exploring modern legal theory to our understanding of democratic society. Habermas, Modernity, and Law brings together leading scholars from around the world to provide a clear introduction to this key development in Habermas's work. With chapters ranging from (...)
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  28. Bernd Magnus (1971). Heidegger's Metahistory of Philosophy: Amor Fati, Being and Truth. The Hague,Nijhoff.
  29. David Ingram (1990). Critical Theory and Philosophy. Paragon House.
  30. Hugh J. Silverman (ed.) (1989). Derrida and Deconstruction. Routledge.
    The effects of Derrida's writings have been widespread in literary circles, where they have transformed current work in literary theory. By contrast Derrida's philosophical writings--which deal with the whole range of western thought from Plato to Foucault--have not received adequate attention by philosophers. Organized around Derrida's readings of major figures in the history of philosophy, Derrida and Deconstruction focuses on and assesses his specifically philosophical contribution. Contemporary continental philosophers assess Derrida's account of philosophical tradition, with each contributor providing a critical (...)
  31. Seán Hand (ed.) (1996). Facing the Other: The Ethics of Emmanuel Lévinas. Curzon.
    This collection explicates Levinas's major contribution to these debates, namely the idea of the primacy of ethics over ontology or epistemology.
  32. Ronald Bogue (1989). Deleuze and Guattari. Routledge.
    First published in 2002. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  33. Yvonne Sherratt (2002). Adorno's Positive Dialectic. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a radically new interpretation of the work of Theodor Adorno. In contrast to the conventional view that Adorno's is in essence a critical philosophy, Yvonne Sherratt traces systematically a utopian thesis that pervades all the major aspects of Adorno's thought. She places Adorno's work in the context of German Idealist and later Marxist and Freudian traditions, and then analyses his key works to show how the aesthetic, epistemological, psychological, historical and sociological thought interconnect to form a utopian (...)
  34. Alan Montefiore (ed.) (1983). Philosophy in France Today. Cambridge University Press.
    Eleven leading contemporary French philosophers give here more or less direct presentations and exemplifications of their work. All the essays, with one exception, were specifically written for this volume and for an English-speaking readership - the exception is the first publication anywhere of Jacques Derrida's defence of his thèse d'e;tat in 1980, based on his published works. As a collection the essays convey the style, tone and preoccupations, as well as the range and diversity, of French philosophical thinking as it (...)
  35. Stephen K. White (1991). Political Theory and Postmodernism. Cambridge University Press.
    Postmodernism has evoked great controversy and it continues to do so today, as it disseminates into general discourse. Some see its principles, such as its fundamental resistance to metanarratives, as frighteningly disruptive, while a growing number are reaping the benefits of its innovative perspective. In Political Theory and Postmodernism, Stephen K. White outlines a path through the postmodern problematic by distinguishing two distinct ways of thinking about the meaning of responsibility, one prevalent in modern and the other in postmodern perspectives. (...)
  36. Jürgen Habermas (2003). Philosophy in a Time of Terror: Dialogues with Jürgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida. University of Chicago Press.
    The idea for Philosophy in a Time of Terror was born hours after the attacks on 9/11 and was realized just weeks later when Giovanna Borradori sat down with Jurgen Habermas and Jacques Derrida in New York City, in separate interviews, to evaluate the significance of the most destructive terrorist act ever perpetrated. This book marks an unprecedented encounter between two of the most influential thinkers of our age as here, for the first time, Habermas and Derrida overcome their mutual (...)
  37. Gail Weiss & Honi Fern Haber (eds.) (1999). Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersections of Nature and Culture. Routledge.
    Of course we have bodies, but there §5 are multiple modes of embodiment and styles of bodily obj edification that -g are critical for the understanding of culture. £ It is this methodological distinction between body and embodiment = that I think ...
  38. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in feminist theory and philosophy. The (...)
  39. Richard Kearney & Mara Rainwater (eds.) (1996). The Continental Philosophy Reader. Routledge.
    The Continental Philosophy Reader is the first comprehensive anthology of key writings from the major figures in European thought. The anthology is organised in three sections which map out the broad territory covered in The Continental Philosophy Reader: from Phenomenology to Hermeneutics, from Marxism to Critical Theory and from Structualism to Deconstruction. Within each section classic thinkers and writings of these movements are presented. The selections have been carefully chosen to be representative of the thinkers, and each piece of writing (...)
  40. Jonathan Simons (1995). Foucault and the Political. Routledge.
    Michel Foucault's involvement with politics, both as an individual and a writer, has been much commented upon but until now has not been systematically reviewed. This is the first major introductory study of Michel Foucault as a political thinker. Jonathon Simons explores the importance of the political in all areas of Foucault's work and life, including important material only recently made available and the implications of various revelations about his private life. Simons relates Foucault's work both to contemporary political thinkers (...)
  41. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.
  42. Joan M. Miller (1981). French Structuralism: A Multidisciplinary Bibliography: With a Checklist of Sources for Louis Althusser, Roland Barthes, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Lucien Goldmann, Jacques Lacan, and an Update of Works on Claude Lévi-Strauss. Garland Pub..
  43. Maurice Merleau-Ponty (1973). The Prose of the World. Evanston,Northwestern University Press.
    The work which this author planned to call The Prose of the World, or Introduction to the Prose of the World, is unfinished.
  44. Eliseo Vivas (1971). Contra Marcuse. New Rochelle, N.Y.,Arlington House.
  45. Michèle Le Dœuff (1991). Hipparchia's Choice: An Essay Concerning Women, Philosophy, Etc. Blackwell.
  46. Jean-Paul Sartre (2004). The Imaginary: A Phenomenological Psychology of the Imagination. Routledge.
    Webber's perceptive new introduction helps to decipher this challenging, seminal work, placing it in the context of the author's work and the history of ...
  47. Gregory McCulloch (1994). Using Sartre: An Analytical Introduction to Early Sartrean Themes. Routledge.
    Using Sartre is an introduction to the philosophy of Jean-Paul Sartre which promotes Sartrean views but adopts a consistently analytical approach to him. Concentrating on his early philosophy, up to and including Sartre's masterwork Being and Nothingness, Gregory McCulloch demonstrates how much analytical philosophers miss when they neglect Sartre and the continental tradition in philosophy. In the classic spirit of analytical philosophy, Using Sartre is a clear and pithy exposition of Sartre's early work. Written specifically for beginners and non-specialists, the (...)
  48. Michelle Boulous Walker (1998). Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence. Routledge.
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body is a fascinating exploration of an overlooked aspect of feminist thought: what is the role of maternity in philosophy and in what ways has it been used by male theorists to effectively "silence" the voices of women in philosophy? Drawing on rich examples such as Plato's allegory of the cave, Sigmund Freud and Melanie Klein's writing on the mother and the mother-daughter relationship, and the psychoanalytic and feminist insights of Irigaray and Kristeva, Michelle Boulous Walker (...)
  49. G. N. Kitching (2008). The Trouble with Theory: The Educational Costs of Postmodernism. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "A critique of postmodernism and poststructuralism and an examination of their impact on higher education.
  50. Quentin Lauer (1978). The Triumph of Subjectivity: An Introduction to Transcendental Phenomenology. Fordham University Press.
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