OAI Archive: eScholarship Repository - University of California

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100 entries most recently downloaded from the archive "eScholarship Repository - University of California"

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  1. Dark Ecologies of Knowledges: A Postphenomenological Approach to Architectonics as Terraprocess.Jason Timothy Taksony Hewitt - unknown
    This series of essays offers a critique of Information Studies, taken as a discipline largely concerned with informational objects and their representations on the one hand and the control of these same by means of other informational objects and their representations on the other. Specifically, the critique put forward here attends to the ways that the common practices of Information Studies may reinforce representationalist ideologies that are historically problematic and that are likely to continue to be so into the future (...)
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  2. L’Autographie Mareysienne: Ou Comment Séparer les Corps Pour les Rapprocher D’Eux-Mêmes.Olivier Roland - unknown
    My paper seeks to show that early cinema was profoundly indebted to the 19th-century debate on the nihilistic and decadent body , and that, in this context, early cinema aimed to galvanize the modern body by bring it back to itself. At the inception of cinematic experiments , the French biologist Etienne-Jules Marey tried to address the problem of “decadent” bodies in his discipline. He sought to reenergize what he perceived as a weakened modern body. With the invention of the (...)
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  3. Biological Principles of Information Storage and Retrieval.Heinz Von Foerster - unknown
  4. Goals and Methods of Research: The Challenge for Family Medicine.J. Shapiro - unknown
    This article suggests that motivations to engage in research, as in any other human activity, are both explicit and implicit. Explicit motivations tend to be objective and rationalist, concerned with such goals as the advancement and organization of knowledge. But implicit motivations, the 'hidden agendas' of research, also exist and can influence the objectives, methods, and conclusions of the research process. In addition, a highly affectively charged activity such as research also develops its own set of symbolic meanings, which further (...)
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  5. Review: Eating Together: Food, Friendship, and Inequality. [REVIEW]Yves Laberge - unknown
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  6. From Scarcity to Surplus: A Contribution to the Critique of Neoclassical Foundations.Ozan Isler - unknown
    This dissertation is composed of two halves: "economies of scarcity," and "economies of surplus." The first part, "economies of scarcity," performs a philosophical critique of modernism by discussing the inherent limits of the foundations of neoclassical economic discourse. Here, rather than formulating utility functions that can better take account of our inherent cognitive biases -- as, for example, behavioral economics does -- I focus on the formal foundations common to all such "utility functions" and describe their shared inherent limits. The (...)
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  7. Literary Biomimesis: Mirror Neurons and the Ontological Priority of Representation.Deborah Jenson & Marco Iacoboni - unknown
    This article traces the contributions of mirror neuron theories in neuroscience to debates on literature and related theories of mimesis or, as Erich Auerbach defined it, the representation of reality. The “ensemble” descriptor used for the visualization technologies on which we currently depend to chart the neuronal firing in the human brain is also an apt term for an additional translational issue between structure and what one might call the philosophical domain. The most carefully established data of brain activity is (...)
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  8. Nietzsche's Zukunftsphilologie: Leopardi, Philology, History.Angela Matilde Capodivacca - unknown
    The first part of this essay examines the importance of Leopardi for Nietzsche qua philologist. Rather than being a way to reduce the influence of Leopardi’s thought on Nietzsche, I argue, the focus on philology is of special importance. Leopardi uses the issue of philology in both the Paralipomeni (section a) and the poem to Angelo Mai (section b) to present a critique of contemporary cultural, historical and political practices with a specific focus on language as the site of memory (...)
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  9. Italy: A Post-Biopolitical Laboratory. From Pasolini's "Il Romanzo Delle Stragi” to De Cataldo's Romanzo Criminale.Lorenzo Fabbri - unknown
    On March 29, 1969, from the pages of Tempo, Pier Paolo Pasolini asks: “Do Novelistic Lives Still Exist?”. In this article, Pasolini wonders whether the novel is still a contemporary literary form or if it is rather something which belongs to the past. He concludes that, as long as the real retains its novelistic structure, the novel will not become outdated. But why did Pasolini pose the question of the novelistic in such a time in Italian history? Pasolini was compelled (...)
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  10. Connecting the Dots. Intelligence and Law Enforcement Since 9/11.Mary Margaret Stalcup & Meg Stalcup - 2009 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco
    This work examines how the conceptualization of knowledge as both problem and solution reconfigured intelligence and law enforcement after 9/11. The idea was that more information should be collected, and better analyzed. If the intelligence that resulted was shared, then terrorists could be identified, their acts predicted, and ultimately prevented. Law enforcement entered into this scenario in the United States, and internationally. "Policing terrorism" refers to the engagement of state and local law enforcement in intelligence, as well as approaching terrorism (...)
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