Results for 'A. M. Daniel'

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  1.  5
    Measurement of Iron Self-Diffusion in Hematite Single Crystals by Secondary Ion-Mass Spectrometry and Comparison with Cation Self-Diffusion in Corundum-Structure Oxides.A. C. S. Sabioni, A. M. Huntz, A. M. J. M. Daniel & W. A. A. Macedo - 2005 - Philosophical Magazine 85 (31):3643-3658.
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  2. Hedonism and Welfare Economics: Daniel M. Hausman.Daniel M. Hausman - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):321-344.
    This essay criticizes the proposal recently defended by a number of prominent economists that welfare economics be redirected away from the satisfaction of people's preferences and toward making people happy instead. Although information about happiness may sometimes be of use, the notion of happiness is sufficiently ambiguous and the objections to identifying welfare with happiness are sufficiently serious that welfare economists are better off using preference satisfaction as a measure of welfare. The essay also examines and criticizes the position associated (...)
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  3.  52
    End-of-Life Decision-Making in Canada: The Report by the Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End-of-Life Decision-Making.Udo Schüklenk, Johannes J. M. van Delden, Jocelyn Downie, Sheila A. M. Mclean, Ross Upshur & Daniel Weinstock - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (s1):1-73.
    ABSTRACTThis report on end‐of‐life decision‐making in Canada was produced by an international expert panel and commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada. It consists of five chapters.Chapter 1 reviews what is known about end‐of‐life care and opinions about assisted dying in Canada.Chapter 2 reviews the legal status quo in Canada with regard to various forms of assisted death.Chapter 3 reviews ethical issues pertaining to assisted death. The analysis is grounded in core values central to Canada's constitutional order.Chapter 4 reviews the (...)
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  4. Preference Satisfaction and Welfare Economics: Daniel M. Hausman and Michael S. McPherson.Daniel M. Hausman - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):1-25.
    The tenuous claims of cost-benefit analysis to guide policy so as to promote welfare turn on measuring welfare by preference satisfaction and taking willingness-to-pay to indicate preferences. Yet it is obvious that people's preferences are not always self-interested and that false beliefs may lead people to prefer what is worse for them even when people are self-interested. So welfare is not preference satisfaction, and hence it appears that cost-benefit analysis and welfare economics in general rely on a mistaken theory of (...)
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  5.  61
    The Role of Disgust in Norms, and of Norms in Disgust Research: Why Liberals Shouldn’T Be Morally Disgusted by Moral Disgust.Jason A. Clark & Daniel M. T. Fessler - 2015 - Topoi 34 (2):483-498.
    Recently, many critics have argued that disgust is a morally harmful emotion, and that it should play no role in our moral and legal reasoning. Here we defend disgust as a morally beneficial moral capacity. We believe that a variety of liberal norms have been inappropriately imported into both moral psychology and ethical studies of disgust: disgust has been associated with conservative authors, values, value systems, and modes of moral reasoning that are seen as inferior to the values and moral (...)
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  6. The Illusion of Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2002 - MIT Press.
    In this book Daniel Wegner offers a novel understanding of the relation of consciousness, the will, and our intentional and voluntary actions. Wegner claims that our experience and common sense view according to which we can influence our behavior roughly the way we experience that we do it is an illusion.
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  7.  60
    Happiness, the Self and Human Flourishing: Daniel M. Haybron.Daniel M. Haybron - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (1):21-49.
    The psychological condition of happiness is normally considered a paradigm subjective good, and is closely associated with subjectivist accounts of well-being. This article argues that the value of happiness is best accounted for by a non-subjectivist approach to welfare: a eudaimonistic account that grounds well-being in the fulfillment of our natures, specifically in self-fulfillment. And self-fulfillment consists partly in authentic happiness. A major reason for this is that happiness, conceived in terms of emotional state, bears a special relationship to the (...)
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  8.  14
    The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings.Laura A. Thompson, Daniel M. Malloy, John M. Cone & David L. Hendrickson - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (2):336-348.
    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker's face in four (...)
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  9.  10
    The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings.Laura A. Thompson, Daniel M. Malloy, John M. Cone & David L. Hendrickson - 2010 - Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 11 (2):336-348.
    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker’s face in four (...)
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  10.  46
    Herculaneum Herculaneum—Past, Present, and Future. By Charles Waldstein, Litt. D., Ph.D., London: Macmillan & Co., 1908. 8vo. LL.D., and Leonard Shoobridge, M.A. Pp. Xxii, 324. 59 Illustrations. 2u.Net. Buried Herculaneum. By Ethel Ross Barker. London: Adam and Charles Black, 1908. 8vo. Xvi, 253. Nine Plans and 64 Plates. 7.1. 6d. [REVIEW]A. M. Daniel - 1909 - The Classical Review 23 (08):267-268.
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  11. When Jack and Jill Make a Deal*: DANIEL M. HAUSMAN.Daniel M. Hausman - 1992 - Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (1):95-113.
    In ordinary circumstances, human actions have a myriad of unintended and often unforeseen consequences for the lives of other people. Problems of pollution are serious examples, but spillovers and side effects are the rule, not the exception. Who knows what consequences this essay may have? This essay is concerned with the problems of justice created by spillovers. After characterizing such spillovers more precisely and relating the concept to the economist's notion of an externality, I shall then consider the moral conclusions (...)
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  12.  1
    The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm.Laura A. Thompson, Daniel M. Malloy, John M. Cone & David L. Hendrickson - 2010 - Interaction Studies. Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies / Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systemsinteraction Studies 11 (2):336-348.
    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker’s face in four (...)
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  13.  9
    Ba Jin as Anarchist Critic of Marxism: Guest Editors’ Introduction.John A. Rapp & Daniel M. Youd - 2015 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 46 (2):3-21.
    This introduction provides background and analysis of Ba Jin’s anarchist essays criticizing Marxism and Leninism, with a coda on Ba Jin’s value and reputation as a writer.
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  14. Cae.Catherine A. Schuppli & Daniel M. Weary - 2007 - In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), Ethics. Greenhaven Press. pp. 1Z2.
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  15.  51
    Deterrence and the Just Distribution of Harm*: DANIEL M. FARRELL.Daniel M. Farrell - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (2):220-240.
    It is extraordinary, when one thinks about it, how little attention has been paid by theorists of the nature and justification of punishment to the idea that punishment is essentially a matter of self-defense. H. L. A. Hart, for example, in his famous “Prolegomenon to the Principles of Punishment,” is clearly committed to the view that, at bottom, there are just three directions in which a plausible theory of punishment can go: we can try to justify punishment on purely consequentialist (...)
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  16.  16
    Implicit Memory for Visual Objects and the Structural Description System.Daniel L. Schacter, Lynn A. Cooper & Suzanne M. Delaney - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (4):367-372.
  17.  40
    Much Ado About Eye Movements to Nothing: A Response to Ferreira Et Al.: Taking a New Look at Looking at Nothing.Daniel C. Richardson, Gerry T. M. Altmann, Michael J. Spivey & Merrit A. Hoover - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (6):235-236.
  18.  51
    Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue.Daniel M. Weinstock - 2002 - Mind 111 (443):707-711.
  19.  5
    Damophon.A. M. Daniel - 1904 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 24:41-57.
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  20.  34
    Roman Sculpture Roman Sculpture From Augustus to Constantine, by Mrs. Arthur Strong. Pp. Xx + 410; 130 Plates. London (Duckworth and Co.) and New York (Charles Scribner's Sons). 1907. [REVIEW]A. M. Daniel - 1908 - The Classical Review 22 (03):85-87.
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  21.  14
    Ethical Concerns with Applied Behavior Analysis for Autism Spectrum "Disorder".Daniel A. Wilkenfeld & Allison M. McCarthy - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 30 (1):31-69.
    This paper has both theoretical and practical ambitions. The theoretical ambitions are to explore what would constitute both effective and ethical treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder.1 However, the practical ambition is perhaps more important: we argue that a dominant form of Applied Behavior Analysis, which is widely taken to be far-and-away the best “treatment”2 for ASD, manifests systematic violations of the fundamental tenets of bioethics. Moreover, the supposed benefits of the treatment not only fail to mitigate these violations, but they (...)
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  22. Vicarious Agency: Experiencing Control Over the Movements of Others.Daniel M. Wegner & Betsy Sparrow - unknown
    Participants watched themselves in a mirror while another person behind them, hidden from view, extended hands forward on each side where participants’ hands would normally appear. The hands performed a series of movements. When participants could hear instructions previewing each movement, they reported an enhanced feeling of controlling the hands. Hearing instructions for the movements also enhanced skin conductance responses when a rubber band was snapped on the other’s wrist after the movements. Such vicarious agency was not felt when the (...)
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  23. The Mind’s Best Trick: How We Experience Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):65-69.
    We often consciously will our own actions. This experience is so profound that it tempts us to believe that our actions are caused by consciousness. It could also be a trick, however – the mind’s way of estimating its own apparent authorship by drawing causal inferences about relationships between thoughts and actions. Cognitive, social, and neuropsychological studies of apparent mental causation suggest that experiences of conscious will frequently depart from actual causal processes and so might not reflect direct perceptions of (...)
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  24.  25
    Solving Belief Problems: Toward a Task Analysis.Daniel Roth & Alan M. Leslie - 1998 - Cognition 66 (1):1-31.
  25.  10
    Implicit Memory for Unfamiliar Objects Depends on Access to Structural Descriptions.Daniel L. Schacter, Lynn A. Cooper & Suzanne M. Delaney - 1990 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 119 (1):5-24.
  26. National Center for Biomedical Ontology: Advancing Biomedicine Through Structured Organization of Scientific Knowledge.Daniel L. Rubin, Suzanna E. Lewis, Chris J. Mungall, Misra Sima, Westerfield Monte, Ashburner Michael, Christopher G. Chute, Ida Sim, Harold Solbrig, M. A. Storey, Barry Smith, John D. Richter, Natasha Noy & Mark A. Musen - 2006 - Omics: A Journal of Integrative Biology 10 (2):185-198.
    The National Center for Biomedical Ontology is a consortium that comprises leading informaticians, biologists, clinicians, and ontologists, funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap, to develop innovative technology and methods that allow scientists to record, manage, and disseminate biomedical information and knowledge in machine-processable form. The goals of the Center are (1) to help unify the divergent and isolated efforts in ontology development by promoting high quality open-source, standards-based tools to create, manage, and use ontologies, (2) to create (...)
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  27.  74
    A Neutral Conception of Reasonableness?Daniel M. Weinstock - 2006 - Episteme 3 (3):234-247.
    Much liberal theorizing of the past twenty years has been built around a conception of neutrality and an accompanying virtue of reasonableness according to which citizens ought to be able to view public policy debates from a perspective detached from their comprehensive conceptions of the good. The view of “justifi catory neutrality” that emerges from this view is discussed and rejected as embodying controversial views about the relationship of individuals to their conceptions of the good. It is shown to be (...)
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  28. Précis of the Illusion of Conscious Will.Daniel M. Wegner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  29.  75
    Voluntary Involuntariness: Thought Suppression and the Regulation of the Experience of Will.Daniel M. Wegner & James A. K. Erskine - 2003 - Consciousness and Cognition 12 (4):684-694.
    Participants were asked to carry out a series of simple tasks while following mental control instructions. In advance of each task, they either suppressed thoughts of their intention to perform the task, concentrated on such thoughts, or monitored their thoughts without trying to change them. Suppression resulted in reduced reports of intentionality as compared to monitoring, and as compared to concentration. There was a weak trend for suppression to enhance reported intentionality for a repetition of the action carried out after (...)
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  30.  28
    Joint Perception: Gaze and Social Context.Daniel C. Richardson, Chris N. H. Street, Joanne Y. M. Tan, Natasha Z. Kirkham, Merrit A. Hoover & Arezou Ghane Cavanaugh - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  31.  63
    Precis of the Illusion of Conscious Will (and Commentaries and Reply).Daniel M. Wegner - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):649-659.
    The experience of conscious will is the feeling that we are doing things. This feeling occurs for many things we do, conveying to us again and again the sense that we consciously cause our actions. But the feeling may not be a true reading of what is happening in our minds, brains, and bodies as our actions are produced. The feeling of conscious will can be fooled. This happens in clinical disorders such as alien hand syndrome, dissociative identity disorder, and (...)
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  32. Chronic Thought Suppression.Daniel M. Wegner & Sophia Zanakos - unknown
    Bear Suppression Inventory (WBSI), was I'ound to correlate with n>casurcs of obsessional thinking and depressive and anxious al'lect, t pridic( signs «I' clinical «hscssion ainong individuals prone (oward «h»c»»i«n >I (hi>>king, (« predict depression tive (h (», and to predict I''iilurc «I' electr«dermal responses to habituate am«ng pci>pic having emotional thoughts. The WBSI was inversely correlated with repression as assessed by the Repression-Sensitization Scale, and so tap» a trait that i» itc unlike rcprc»si«n:is traditi«n;illy c«nccivcd.
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  33. Thought Suppression.Daniel M. Wegner - unknown
    Key Words mental control, intrusive thought, rebound effect, ironic processes Abstract Although thought suppression is a popular form of mental control, research has indicated that it can be counterproductive, helping assure the very state of mind one had hoped to avoid. This chapter reviews the research on suppression, which spans a wide range of domains, including emotions, memory, interpersonal processes, psychophysiological reactions, and psychopathology. The chapter considers the relevant methodological and theoretical issues and suggests directions for future research.
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  34.  7
    A Companion to Ethics.Daniel M. Farrell - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):930-932.
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  35.  14
    Teaching Ethics: The Moral Development of Educators.Daniel A. Stout & Elizabeth M. Tucker - 1999 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 14 (2):107-118.
    The moral development of advertising educators is important to an understanding of how they teach ethics. This article describes a survey that explores how advertising educators define and think about ethics. It examines the theoretical foundations of moral development in relation to teaching advertising ethics and provides a summary describing advertising educators' ideas about the nature of ethics. We conclude by predicting today's advertising students' ability to identify and resolve ethical dilemmas.
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  36. The Hyperaccessibility of Suppressed Thoughts.Daniel M. Wegner - unknown
    The accessibility of suppressed thoughts was compared with the accessibility of thoughts on which Ss were consciously trying to concentrate. In Experiment I, Ss made associations to word prompts as they tried to suppress thinking about a target word (e.g., house) or tried to concentrate on that word. Under the cognitive load imposed by time pressure, they gave the target word in response to target-related prompts (e.g., home) more often during suppression than during concentration. In Experiment 2, reaction times for (...)
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  37.  13
    Methodological Challenges in European Ethics Approvals for a Genetic Epidemiology Study in Critically Ill Patients: The GenOSept Experience.Ascanio Tridente, Paul A. H. Holloway, Paula Hutton, Anthony C. Gordon, Gary H. Mills, Geraldine M. Clarke, Jean-Daniel Chiche, Frank Stuber, Christopher Garrard, Charles Hinds & Julian Bion - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):30.
    During the set-up phase of an international study of genetic influences on outcomes from sepsis, we aimed to characterise potential differences in ethics approval processes and outcomes in participating European countries. Between 2005 and 2007 of the FP6-funded international Genetics Of Sepsis and Septic Shock project, we asked national coordinators to complete a structured survey of research ethic committee approval structures and processes in their countries, and linked these data to outcomes. Survey findings were reconfirmed or modified in 2017. Eighteen (...)
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  38. Transactive Memory in Close Relationships.Daniel M. Wegner - 1991 - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 61:923--929.
    Memory perfttrmattce of 118 individuals who had been iu close dating relationships for at least 3 months was studied. For a memory task ostensibly to be performed by pairs, some Ss were paired..
     
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  39. Book Review: Daniel G. Groody and Gioacchino Campese , A Promised Land, A Perilous Journey: Theological Perspectives on Migration . Xxvii + 332 Pp. US$32.00 , ISBN 978—0—268—02973—9. M. Daniel Carroll R., Christians at the Border: Immigration, the Church, and the Bible . 176 Pp. US$16.99 , ISBN 978—0—8010—3566—1. [REVIEW]Andy Draycott - 2010 - Studies in Christian Ethics 23 (2):213-216.
  40.  2
    Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Enhances Retention of Visuomotor Stepping Skills in Healthy Adults.Shih-Chiao Tseng, Shuo-Hsiu Chang, Kristine M. Hoerth, Anh-Tu A. Nguyen & Daniel Perales - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  41.  18
    The Control Process is Represented in Both the Inferior and Superior Parietal Lobules.David E. Vaillancourt, Mary A. Mayka & Daniel M. Corcos - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):51-52.
    Glover postulates that the inferior parietal lobule (IPL), along with the frontal lobes and basal ganglia, mediates planning, while the superior parietal lobule (SPL), coupled with motor processes in the cerebellum, regulates the control process. We demonstrate that the control process extends beyond the cerebellum and SPL into regions hypothesized to represent planning.
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  42. Michel de Certeau: Mystische Fabel. 16. bis 17. Jahrhundert. Übersetzt von Michael Laube. Mit einem Nachwort von Daniel Bogner. Frankfurt a. M. 2011. Suhrkamp. [REVIEW]Mensch Zwischen Möglichkeit - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58:264 - 266.
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  43. Blaming God for Our Pain: Human Suffering and the Divine Mind.M. Wegner Daniel & Gray Kurt - unknown
    Believing in God requires not only a leap of faith but also an extension of people’s normal capacity to perceive the minds of others. Usually, people perceive minds of all kinds by trying to understand their conscious experience (what it is like to be them) and their agency (what they can do). Although humans are perceived to have both agency and experience, humans appear to see God as possessing agency, but not experience. God’s unique mind is due, the authors suggest, (...)
     
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  44. Who is the Controller of Controlled Processes?Daniel M. Wegner - 2005 - In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 19-36.
    Are we the robots? This question surfaces often in current psychological re- search, as various kinds of robot parts-automatic actions, mental mechanisms, even neural circuits-keep appearing in our explanations of human behavior. Automatic processes seem responsible for a wide range of the things we do, a fact that may leave us feeling, if not fully robotic, at least a bit nonhuman. The complement of the automatic process in contemporary psychology, of course, is the controlled process (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1968; Bargh, (...)
     
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  45. The Sting of Intentional Pain.Daniel M. Wegner & Kurt Gray - unknown
    When someone steps on your toe on purpose, it seems to hurt more than when the person does the same thing unintentionally. The physical parameters of the harm may not differ—your toe is flattened in both cases—but the psychological experience of pain is changed nonetheless. Intentional harms are premeditated by another person and have the specific purpose of causing pain. In a sense, intended harms are events initiated by one mind to communicate meaning (malice) to another, and this could shape (...)
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  46.  39
    The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics.Daniel M. Hausman - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a comprehensive overview of the structure, strategy and methods of assessment of orthodox theoretical economics. In Part I Professor Hausman explains how economists theorise, emphasising the essential underlying commitment of economists to a vision of economics as a separate science. In Part II he defends the view that the basic axioms of economics are 'inexact' since they deal only with the 'major' causes; unlike most writers on economic methodology, the author argues that it is the rules that (...)
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  47.  56
    The Mismeasure of Morals: Antisocial Personality Traits Predict Utilitarian Responses to Moral Dilemmas.Daniel M. Bartels & David A. Pizarro - 2011 - Cognition 121 (1):154-161.
  48. How to Think, Say, or Do Precisely the Worst Thing for Any Occasion.Daniel M. Wegner - unknown
    In slapstick comedy, the worst thing that could happen usually does: The person with a sore toe manages to stub it, sometimes twice. Such errors also arise in daily life, and research traces the tendency to do precisely the worst thing to ironic processes of mental control. These monitoring processes keep us watchful for errors of thought, speech, and action and enable us to avoid the worst thing in most situations, but they also increase the likelihood of such errors when (...)
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  49.  68
    Caring About Framing Effects.Amber N. Bloomfield, Josh A. Sager, Daniel M. Bartels & Douglas L. Medin - 2006 - Mind and Society 5 (2):123-138.
    We explored the relationship between qualities of victims in hypothetical scenarios and the appearance of framing effects. In past studies, participants’ feelings about the victims have been demonstrated to affect whether framing effects appear, but this relationship has not been directly examined. In the present study, we examined the relationship between caring about the people at risk, the perceived interdependence of the people at risk, and frame. Scenarios were presented that differed in the degree to which participants could be expected (...)
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  50.  3
    Microeconomic Laws: A Philosophical Analysis.Daniel M. Hausman - 1979 - Noûs 13 (1):118-122.
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