Results for 'Jay S. Kaufman'

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  1.  17
    Flaws in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Rationale for Supporting the Development and Approval of BiDil as a Treatment for Heart Failure Only in Black Patients.George T. H. Ellison, Jay S. Kaufman, Rosemary F. Head, Paul A. Martin & Jonathan D. Kahn - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (3):449-457.
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's rationale for supporting the development and approval of BiDil for heart failure specifically in black patients was based on under-powered, post hoc subgroup analyses of two relatively old trials , which were further complicated by substantial covariate imbalances between racial groups. Indeed, the only statistically significant difference observed between black and white patients was found without any adjustment for potential confounders in samples that were unlikely to have been adequately randomized. Meanwhile, because the accepted (...)
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  2.  24
    Clines Without Classes.Joan H. Fujimura, Deborah A. Bolnick, Ramya Rajagopalan, Jay S. Kaufman, Richard C. Lewontin, Troy Duster, Pilar Ossorio & Jonathan Marks - 2014 - Sociological Theory 32 (3):208-227.
    This article examines Shiao, Bode, Beyer, and Selvig’s (2012) arguments in their article “The Genomic Challenge to the Social Construction of Race” and finds that their claims are based on fundamentally flawed interpretations of current genetic research. We discuss current genomic and genetic knowledge about human biological variation to demonstrate why and how Shiao et al.’s recommendations for future sociological studies and social policy, based on their inadequate understanding of genomic methods and evidence, are similarly flawed and will lead sociology (...)
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  3.  26
    Ottawa Statement From the Sparking Solutions Summit on Population Health Intervention Research : Déclaration D’Ottawa Issue du Sommet Provoquer des Solutions Sur la Recherche Interventionnelle En Santé des Populations.Erica Ruggiero, Louise Potvin, John P. Allegrante, Angus Dawson, Marcel Verweij, Evelyn Leeuw, James R. Dunn, Eduardo Franco, Katherine L. Frohlich, Robert Geneau, Suzanne Jackson, Jay S. Kaufman, Alfredo Morabia, Kenneth R. Mcleroy & Valéry Ridde - unknown
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  4.  61
    Walter E. Broman, Timothy C. Lord, Roy W. Perrett, Colin Dickson, Jill P. Baumgaertner, Eva L. Corredor, William E. Cain, Ronald Bogue, Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn, Jay S. Andrews, David M. Thompson, David Carey, David Parker, David Novitz, Norman Simms, David Herman, Paul Taylor, Jeff Mason, Robert D. Cottrell, David Gorman, Mark Stein, Constance S. Spreen, Will Morrisey, Jan Pilditch, Herman Rapaport, Mark Johnson, Michael McClintick, John D. Cox, Arthur Kirsch, Burton Watson, Michael Platt, Gary M. Ciuba, Karsten Harries, Mary Anne O'Neil. [REVIEW]Wendell V. Harris - 1992 - Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):373.
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  5. Adorno and Ethics.Martin Jay, Christina Gerhardt, Rob Kaufman, Detlev Claussen & J. M. Bernstein (eds.) - 2006 - Duke University Press.
    Because of his preoccupation with the formal aspects of music and literature, Theodor W. Adorno is often regarded as the most aesthetically oriented thinker of the Frankfurt School theorists. It is Adorno’s perceived commitment to aestheticism—the study of art for art’s sake and the study of art as a source of sensuous pleasure, rather than as a vehicle for culturally constructed morality or meaning—that many scholars have criticized as hostile to genuine, concrete, substantive political, social, and ethical engagement with the (...)
     
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  6.  12
    Diesing and Piccone on Kaufman.Arnold S. Kaufman - 1967 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 10 (1-4):211-216.
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  7. Jay's *Songs of Experience*. [REVIEW]Gregory Nixon - 2007 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):125-7.
    ‘Experience is the best teacher’ goes the cliché without ever making clear just want is meant by that slippery first term. ‘Experience is never remembered unaltered’ goes another. Is experience something to be undergone, like a journey, or is it perhaps the relational immediacy between organism and environment? What do we reference when we use the term experience? -/- Martin Jay, renowned intellectual historian from UC Berkeley, here examines these questions in a grand survey of the term’s use throughout the (...)
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  8.  23
    Recent Developments in Health Law.Jay S. Reidler, Joshua Berkowitz, Katherine Booth, Britt Cramer & Jennifer M. Klein - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (2):409-426.
  9.  7
    Reading the Postmodern Polity: Political Theory as Textual Practice (Review).Jay S. Andrews - 1992 - Philosophy and Literature 16 (2):388-389.
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  10. Who Executes the Executioner-Impeachment, Indictment and Other Alternatives to Assassination.Jay S. Bybee - 1997 - Nexus 2:53.
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  11.  88
    Kaufman's Response to Lucretius.Jens Johansson - 2008 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (4):470-485.
    Abstract: The symmetry argument is an objection to the 'deprivation approach'– the account of badness favored by nearly all philosophers who take death to be bad for the one who dies. Frederik Kaufman's recent response to the symmetry argument is a development of Thomas Nagel's suggestion that we could not have come into existence substantially earlier than we in fact did. In this paper, I aim to show that Kaufman's suggestion fails. I also consider several possible modifications of (...)
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  12.  9
    Recent Case Developments in Health Law.Sally Wang, Jeremy O. Bressman & Jay S. Reidler - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):708-716.
    The False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. § 3729, a post-Civil War law inspired by cases of defense contracting fraud, was revitalized in 1986. Since then it has been used to sue both manufacturers and providers of pharmaceuticals. In some cases, these suits were meant to target offlabel marketing of pharmaceuticals. In 2009, the 11th Circuit rendered a decision in Hopper v. Solvay Pharmaceuticals that dramatically limits the ability of private plaintiff whistle-blowers to bring qui tam suits under the FCA for (...)
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  13.  54
    Normativity and the Will: R. Jay Wallace.R. Jay Wallace - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 55:195-216.
    If there is room for a substantial conception of the will in contemporary theorizing about human agency, it is most likely to be found in the vicinity of the phenomenon of normativity. Rational agency is distinctively responsive to the agent's acknowledgment of reasons, in the basic sense of considerations that speak for and against the alternatives for action that are available. Furthermore, it is natural to suppose that this kind of responsiveness to reasons is possible only for creatures who possess (...)
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  14. The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā.Jay L. Garfield - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    For nearly two thousand years Buddhism has mystified and captivated both lay people and scholars alike. Seen alternately as a path to spiritual enlightenment, an system of ethical and moral rubrics, a cultural tradition, or simply a graceful philosophy of life, Buddhism has produced impassioned followers the world over. The Buddhist saint Nagarjuna, who lived in South India in approximately the first century CE, is undoubtedly the most important, influential, and widely studied Mahayana Buddhist philosopher. His many works include texts (...)
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  15.  68
    A Satisfactory Minimum Conception of Justice: Reconsidering Rawls's Maximin Argument.Alexander Kaufman - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):349-369.
    John Rawls argues that it is possible to describe a suitably defined initial situation from which to form reliable judgements about justice. In this initial situation, rational persons are deprived of information that is . It is rational, Rawls argues, for persons choosing principles of justice from this standpoint to be guided by the maximin rule. Critics, however, argue that (i) the maximin rule is not the appropriate decision rule for Rawls's choice position; (ii) the maximin argument relies upon an (...)
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  16. Descartes's Creation Doctrine and Modality.Dan Kaufman - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (1):24 – 41.
  17.  21
    Practical Decision.Arnold S. Kaufman - 1966 - Mind 75 (297):25-44.
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  18. God's Immutability and the Necessity of Descartes's Eternal Truths.Dan Kaufman - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):1-19.
  19.  19
    The Political Philosophy of Arnold S. Kaufman.Richard Rodewald & Richard Wasserstrom - 1972 - Social Theory and Practice 2 (1):5-31.
  20. What's Wrong with Preventive War? The Moral and Legal Basis for the Preventive Use of Force.Whitley Kaufman - 2005 - Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):23–38.
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  21.  33
    Welfare in the Kantian State.Alexander Kaufman - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    A traditional interpretation holds that Kant's political theory simply constitutes an account of the constraints which reason places on the state's authority to regulate external action. Alexander Kaufman argues that this traditional interpretation succeeds neither as a faithful reading of Kant's texts nor as a plausible, philosophically sound reconstruction of a `Kantian' political theory. Rather, he argues that Kant's political theory articulates a positive conception of the state's role.
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  22. Ability.Arnold S. Kaufman - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (19):537-551.
  23.  27
    Horace M. Kallen's Use of Evolutionary Theory in Support of American Jews and Democracy.Matthew Kaufman - 2017 - Zygon 52 (4):922-942.
    This article examines the rhetorical deployment of Darwinian natural selection by the Jewish social philosopher Horace M. Kallen, in what is now widely regarded as the first articulation of cultural pluralism, “Democracy versus the Melting-Pot”. My analysis proceeds in two steps. First, I identify specific strategies by means of which Kallen endeavored to insert his ideas more deeply into national discourse. I also trace reactions to his essay in the Jewish press, and argue that these indicate ongoing conversations concerning Kallen's (...)
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  24.  5
    Distributive Justice and Access to Advantage: G. A. Cohen’s Egalitarianism.Alexander Kaufman (ed.) - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    G. A. Cohen was one of the world's leading political theorists. He was noted, in particular, for his contributions to the literature of egalitarian justice. Cohen's classic writings offer one of the most influential responses to the currency of the egalitarian justice question - the question, that is, of whether egalitarians should seek to equalize welfare, resources, opportunity, or some other indicator of well-being. Underlying Cohen's argument is the intuition that the purpose of egalitarianism is to eliminate disadvantage for which (...)
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  25.  5
    Commentary: Whither Physician Talk and Medicine’s Tools?Sharon R. Kaufman - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (3):405-409.
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  26. Responsibility and the Moral Sentiments.R. Jay Wallace - 1994 - Harvard University Press.
    R. Jay Wallace argues in this book that moral accountability hinges on questions of fairness: When is it fair to hold people morally responsible for what they do? Would it be fair to do so even in a deterministic world? To answer these questions, we need to understand what we are doing when we hold people morally responsible, a stance that Wallace connects with a central class of moral sentiments, those of resentment, indignation, and guilt. To hold someone responsible, he (...)
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  27.  24
    Thinking Historically When the Margins Become the Center: Intellectual History as Historical Critique in Martin Jay's Essays From the Edge.John E. Toews - 2012 - History and Theory 51 (3):397-410.
    ABSTRACTThis review of Martin Jay's recent published collection of essays examines his ongoing rethinking, supplementation, and revision of central themes—the negative and positive dialectics of historical totalization, the varieties and uses of conceptions of experience, the nature of visual cultures and scopic regimes, and the ambiguities of truth‐construction in the public realm—that have been the focus of his major works since the 1970s. It argues that his more recent work indicates a gradual shift toward an affirmation of the kinds of (...)
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  28. Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation.Jay L. Garfield - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  29. Complex Systems, Trade‐Offs, and Theoretical Population Biology: Richard Levin's “Strategy of Model Building in Population Biology” Revisited.Jay Odenbaugh - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1496-1507.
    Ecologist Richard Levins argues population biologists must trade‐off the generality, realism, and precision of their models since biological systems are complex and our limitations are severe. Steven Orzack and Elliott Sober argue that there are cases where these model properties cannot be varied independently of one another. If this is correct, then Levins's thesis that there is a necessary trade‐off between generality, precision, and realism in mathematical models in biology is false. I argue that Orzack and Sober's arguments fail since (...)
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  30.  9
    Thinking Historically When the Margins Become the Center: Intellectual History as Historical Critique in Martin Jay's Essays From the Edge.John E. Toews - 2012 - History and Theory 51 (3):397-410.
    ABSTRACTThis review of Martin Jay's recent published collection of essays examines his ongoing rethinking, supplementation, and revision of central themes—the negative and positive dialectics of historical totalization, the varieties and uses of conceptions of experience, the nature of visual cultures and scopic regimes, and the ambiguities of truth‐construction in the public realm—that have been the focus of his major works since the 1970s. It argues that his more recent work indicates a gradual shift toward an affirmation of the kinds of (...)
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  31.  13
    The Mnemonic Consequences of Jurors’ Selective Retrieval During Deliberation.Alexander C. V. Jay, Charles B. Stone, Robert Meksin, Clinton Merck, Natalie S. Gordon & William Hirst - 2019 - Topics in Cognitive Science 11 (4):627-643.
  32.  46
    Techno-Secularism and "Revealed Religion": Some Problems with Caiazza's Analysis.Gordon D. Kaufman - 2005 - Zygon 40 (2):323-334.
  33.  48
    Accessing Kant: A Relaxed Introduction to the Critique of Pure Reason.Jay F. Rosenberg - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    Jay Rosenberg introduces Immanuel Kant's masterwork, the Critique of Pure Reason, from a "relaxed" problem-oriented perspective which treats Kant as an especially insightful practicing philosopher, from whom we still have much to learn, intelligently and creatively responding to significant questions that transcend his work's historical setting. Rosenberg's main project is to command a clear view of how Kant understands various perennial problems, how he attempts to resolve them, and to what extent he succeeds. At the same time the book is (...)
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  34.  75
    Anthony Quinton on Punishment.Arnold S. Kaufman - 1959 - Analysis 20 (1):10 - 13.
  35.  1
    The History and Fulfilment of Western Rationality: Martin Jay’s The Eclipse of Reason.Robert Doran - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 14 (1):93-103.
    This review-essay examines Martin Jay’s The Eclipse of Reason: On Late Critical Theory with a view toward understanding the stakes of its interpretative approach to intellectual history. I show how Jay's book aims to provide much more than a mere history of reason, for it seeks to legitimate and resuscitate an idea of reason in the face of more than one hundred years of anti-rationalist thought. I contend that Jay offers Habermas’s intersubjective rationality as both an alternative to, but also (...)
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  36.  46
    The Analytic and the Synthetic: A Tenable "Dualism".Arnold S. Kaufman - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (3):421-426.
  37. The Conventional Status of Reflexive Awareness: What's at Stake in a Tibetan Debate?Jay L. Garfield - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (2):201-228.
    ‘Ju Mipham Rinpoche, (1846-1912) an important figure in the _Ris med_, or non- sectarian movement influential in Tibet in the late 19<sup>th</sup> and early 20<sup>th</sup> Centuries, was an unusual scholar in that he was a prominent _Nying ma_ scholar and _rDzog_ _chen_ practitioner with a solid dGe lugs education. He took dGe lugs scholars like Tsong khapa and his followers seriously, appreciated their arguments and positions, but also sometimes took issue with them directly. In his commentary to Candrak¥rti’s _Madhyamakåvatåra, _Mi (...)
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  38. Rawls's Practical Conception of Justice: Opinion, Tradition and Objectivity in Political Liberalism.Alexander Kaufman - 2006 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (1):23-43.
    In Political Liberalism, Rawls emphasizes the practical character and aims of his conception of justice. Justice as fairness is to provide the basis of a reasoned, informed and willing political agreement by locating grounds for consensus in the fundamental ideas and values of the political culture. Critics urge, however, that such a politically liberal conception of justice will be designed merely to ensure the stability of political institutions by appealing to the currently-held opinions of actual citizens. In order to evaluate (...)
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  39.  10
    “Evidentialism”: A Theologian’s Response.Gordon D. Kaufman - 1989 - Faith and Philosophy 6 (1):35-46.
    Current discussions of “evidentialism” seem to presuppose essentially traditional theistic conceptions and formulations. For many theologians. however, these have become problematic because of the rise of a new consciousness of the significance of religiouspluralism; the emergence of theories about the ways in which our symbolic frames of orientation shape all our experiencing and thinking; a growing awareness that significant responsibility for some of the major evils of the twentieth century must be laid to ourreligious traditions. Since recent discussion of “evidentialism” (...)
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  40.  50
    Kaufman on Art, Family Resemblances, and Wittgenstein.Ben Tilghman - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):86-88.
    Kaufman describes the current debate on the possibility of a definition of art between the theorists and the anti-theorist Wittgensteinians. The Wittgensteinian reliance on ‘family resemblances’ is a serious objection to theoretical definitions. Wittgenstein, however, is said to be unable to give a proper account of the ‘inner experience’ encountered in art. By way of response, it is urged that attention to Wittgenstein himself will show that there are misunderstandings of the idea of family resemblances and that Wittgenstein's writings (...)
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  41. What is It Like to Be a Bodhisattva? Moral Phenomenology in Íåntideva's Bodhicaryåvatåra.Jay Garfield - unknown
    Bodhicaryåvatåra was composed by the Buddhist monk scholar Íåntideva at Nalandå University in India sometime during the 8th Century CE. It stands as one the great classics of world philosophy and of Buddhist literature, and is enormously influential in Tibet, where it is regarded as the principal source for the ethical thought of Mahåyåna Buddhism. The title is variously translated, most often as A Guide to the Bodhisattva’s Way of Life or Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds, translations that follow the (...)
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  42.  40
    I. The Panda's Thumb.Stephen Jay Gould - unknown
    FEW HEROES LOWER their sights in the prime of their lives; triumph leads inexorably on, often to destruction. Alexander wept because he had no new worlds to conquer; Napoleon, overextended, sealed his doom in the depth of a Russian winter. But Charles Darwin did not follow the Origin of Species (1859) with a general defense of natural selection or with its evident extension to human evolution (he waited until 1871 to publish The Descent of Man). Instead, he wrote his most (...)
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  43. Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499–534.
    In a well-known paper, Reginald Jackson expresses a sentiment not uncommon among readers of Locke: “Among the merits of Locke’s Essay…not even the friendliest critic would number consistency.”2 This unflattering opinion of Locke is reiterated by Maurice Mandelbaum: “Under no circumstances can [Locke] be counted among the clearest and most consistent of philosophers.”3 The now familiar story is that there are innumerable inconsistencies and internal problems contained in Locke’s Essay. In fact, it is probably safe to say that there is (...)
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  44.  53
    Re‐Conceiving God and Humanity in Light of Today's Evolutionary‐Ecological Consciousness.Gordon D. Kaufman - 2001 - Zygon 36 (2):335-348.
  45.  96
    Jay L. Garfield, Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy. [REVIEW]Rick Repetti - 2015 - Science, Religion and Culture 2 (2):1-6.
    Book review of Jay Garfield's Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy.
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  46.  88
    Rawls and Kantian Constructivism.Alexander Kaufman - 2012 - Kantian Review 17 (2):227-256.
    John Rawls's account of Kantian constructivism is perhaps his most striking contribution to ethics. In this paper, I examine the relation between Rawls's constructivism and its foundation in Kantian intuitions. In particular, I focus on the progressive influence on Rawls's approach of the Kantian intuition that the substance of morality is best understood as constructed by free and equal people under fair conditions. Rawls's focus on this Kantian intuition, I argue, motivates the focus on social contract that grounds both his (...)
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  47.  4
    Banghuad; A Community Study in Thailand.E. H. S. & Howard Keva Kaufman - 1960 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 80 (4):390.
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  48.  60
    Kaufman's Debt to Kant: The Epistemological Importance of the “Structure of the World Which Environs Us”.J. Patrick Woolley - 2013 - Zygon 48 (3):544-564.
    Gordon Kaufman's “constructive theology” can easily be taken out of context and misunderstood or misrepresented as a denial of God. It is too easily overlooked that in his approach everything is an imaginary construct given no immediate ontological status—the self, the world, and God are “products of the imagination.” This reflects an influence, not only of theories on linguistic and cultural relativism, but also of Kant's “ideas of pure reason.” Kaufman is explicit about this debt to Kant. But (...)
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  49. Exaptation–A Missing Term in the Science of Form.Stephen Jay Gould & Elisabeth S. Vrba - 1982 - In David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.), The Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  50. Nagarjuna's Theory of Causality: Implications Sacred and Profane.Jay L. Garfield - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (4):507-524.
    Nāgārjuna argues for the fundamental importance of causality, and dependence more generally, to our understanding of reality and of human life: his account of these matters is generally correct. First, his account of interdependence shows how we can clearly understand the nature of scientific explanation, the relationship between distinct levels of theoretical analysis in the sciences (with particular attention to cognitive science), and how we can sidestep difficulties in understanding the relations between apparently competing ontologies induced by levels of description (...)
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