Results for 'J. J. H'

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  1.  12
    The Athenian Expounders of the Sacred and Ancestral Law. By J. H. Oliver. Pp. Xiv + 179. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press , 1950. 40s[REVIEW]M. N. Tod & J. H. Oliver - 1951 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 71:270-271.
  2.  25
    Against the Fantasts: J. L. H. Thomas.J. L. H. Thomas - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (257):349-367.
    Amongst Kant's lesser known early writings is a short treatise with the curious title Dreams of a Spirit-Seer Explained by Dreams of Metaphysics , in which, (...)with considerable acumen and brilliance, and not a little irony, Kant exposes the empty pretensions of his contemporary, the Swedish visionary and Biblical exegete, Emanuel Swedenborg, to have access to a spirit world, denied other mortals. Despite his efforts, it must be feared, however, that Kant did not, alas, succeed in laying the spirit of Swedenborg himself to rest once and for all, for there has arisen in our own day, and within philosophy itself, a movement of thought, if such it can be called, which, like that of Swedenborg, is founded upon an unbridled and unhealthy exercise of the imagination, and apparently believes that philosophical problems can be discussed and resolved by the elaboration of fantastical, and at times repulsive, examples; if we require a name for this contemporary pretence at philosophy, we could take as our model the Italian word for science fiction, fantascienza , and call itfantaphilosophy’: it is my aim to show that this fantaphilosophy is a phantom philosophy. (shrink)
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  3.  88
    Nature and Natural Authority in Bentham*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1993 - Utilitas 5 (2):209-219.
    My object in this paper is to suggest a few reflections on some themes in Bentham's work which others as well as I have noted, without (...)perhaps developing them as fully as might with advantage be done. There will be nothing like full development in the limited compass of what is said here, but what is said may at least indicate possible directions for further exploration. The greater part of the paper will be concerned with the notion of natural authority; but I want to begin by taking a broader, though no doubt rather superficial, view of the role in Bentham's thinking of the concepts ofnatureandthe natural’. (shrink)
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  4.  71
    Utilitarianism and Reform: Social Theory and Social Change, 17501800*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (2):211-225.
    The object of this article is to examine, with the work of Jeremy Bentham as the principal example, one strand in the complex pattern of European social (...)
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  5.  26
    Why Did It Happen to Me?’: J. L. H. THOMAS.J. L. H. Thomas - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (3):323-334.
    There are doubtless many with personal experience of suffering, or of comforting others in distress, who would agree with Milton thus far that philosophic argument is powerless (...)
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  6. Metabletica En Wetenschap Kritische Bestandsopname van Het Werk van J.H. Van den Berg.J. H. van den Berg & J. van Belzen - 1997
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  7.  17
    Constantine Porphyrogenitus, De Administrando Imperio. By Ed. Gy. Moravcsik, with English Translation by R. J. H. Jenkins. Pp. 347. Budapest: Egyetemi Görög Filológiai, 1949 Intézet[REVIEW]C. A. Trypanis, Gy Moravcsik & R. J. H. Jenkins - 1952 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 72:160-160.
  8.  14
    Biological Principles: A Critical Study.J. H. Woodger - 1948 - Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  9. Why a Diagram is (Sometimes) Worth a Thousand Words….J. Takrkin & H. A. Simon - 1987 - Cognitive Science 1:l.
     
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  10.  30
    IN.J.H. Dent.N. J. H. Dent - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):57-73.
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  11.  54
    Biological Principles.J. H. Woodger - 1930 - Mind 39 (155):403-405.
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  12. Is the Grain of Vision Finer Than the Grain of Attention? Response to Block.J. H. Taylor - 2013 - Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):20-28.
    In many theories in contemporary philosophy of mind, attention is constitutively linked to phenomenal consciousness. Ned Block has recently argued thatidentity crowdingprovides an example of (...)
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  13.  28
    J. H. F. UMBGROVE, Leven en Materie. 's Gravenhage, Martinus Nijhoff, 1943.J. H. Diemer - 1944 - Philosophia Reformata 9 (1-2):62-64.
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  14. Rousseau on Amour-Propre: N.J.H. Dent.N. J. H. Dent - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):57–74.
    According to familiar accounts, Rousseau held that humans are actuated by two distinct kinds of self love: amour de soi, a benign concern for one's self-preservation (...) and well-being; and amour-propre, a malign concern to stand above other people, delighting in their despite. I argue that although amour-propre can (and often does) assume this malign form, this is not intrinsic to its character. The first and best rank among men that amour-propre directs us to claim for ourselves is that of occupying 'man's estate'. This does not require, indeed it precludes, subjection of others. Amour-propre does not need suppression or circumscription if we are to live good lives; it rather requires direction to its proper end, not a delusive one. (shrink)
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  15.  48
    Art After Philosophy and After: Collected Writings, 1966-1990.J. H. J. & Joseph Kosuth - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):262.
  16. J. J. Chevalier: Los Grandes Textospoliticos Desde Maquiavelo A Nuestros Días.J. H. J. & Staff - 1955 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 14 (53/54):441.
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  17. From Biology to Mathematics.J. H. Woodger - 1952 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (9):1-21.
  18.  15
    Passage of Time Judgements.J. H. Wearden - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 38:165-171.
  19.  49
    Art After Philosophy and After Collected Writings, 1966- 1990.J. H. J. & Joseph Kosuth - 1991
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  20.  40
    Conceptual Fragmentation and the Rise of Eliminativism.J. H. Taylor & Peter Vickers - unknown
    Pluralist and eliminativist positions in philosophyand other disciplineshave proliferated in recent decades. This paper emphasises the sheer scale of this movement: we start by (...)summarising twenty debates which have been affected, thus illustrating how often debates have been transformed by the introduction of pluralist and/or eliminativist thinking. We then provide an explanation of why this shift of philosophical terrain has occurred, an explanation which in turn predicts that its reach will extend to other debates currently unaffected, and for good reasons. We go on to detail the landscape of various different pluralist and eliminativist positions one may favour. We ultimately argue for pluralism at the meta-level: whether one should implement pluralism or eliminativism depends on the context of discussion and the details of the debate at hand. We use this analysis to dissolve debates betweenpluralistsandeliminativistsin various domains. (shrink)
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  21.  44
    Objectivity and Social Anthropology: J. H. M. Beattie.J. H. M. Beattie - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 17:1-20.
    This lecture is divided, roughly, into three parts. First, there is a general and perhaps rather simple-minded discussion of what are thefactsthat social anthropologists (...)study; is there anything special about thesefactswhich makes them different from other kinds of facts? It will be useful to start with the common-sense distinction between two kinds or, better, aspects of social facts; firstthough neither is analytically prior to the otherand putting it very crudely, ‘what people do’, the aspect of social interaction, and second, ‘whatand howpeople think’, the conceptual, classifying, cognitive component of human culture. Now in reality, of course , these two aspects are inextricably intertwined. But it is essential to distinguish them analytically, because each aspect gives rise to quite different kinds of problems of understanding for the social anthropologist. We shall see that the problem of how to beobjective’, and so to avoid ethnographic error, arises in both contexts, but in rather different forms in each. (shrink)
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  22.  29
    Diderot: Man and Society: J. H. Brumfitt.J. H. Brumfitt - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:162-183.
    Principal editor of the great Encyclopedia , novelist and prose writer of genius, contributor to the development of scientific thought and method, to the theory of the bourgeois (...) drama and to the practice of art criticism, Diderot perhaps embodies the rich variety of the Enlightenment spirit more than any other man. His only real rival is surely Voltaire. Rousseau, whose influence was greater than Diderot's, would not thank us for classing him among the philosophes . The more profound philosophers - a Hume or a Kant - not only lack his range, but are less unquestionablyEnlightenment men’. (shrink)
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  23. The theological Papers of J. H. Newman on Faith and Certainty.J. H. Newman, Hugo M. de Achaval & J. Derek Holmes - 1978 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 40 (2):339-339.
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  24. Science Without Properties.J. H. Woodger - 1951 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (7):193-216.
  25.  12
    The Agglomeration Into Clusters of Interstitial Atoms and Vacancies Generated by Fast Neutron Irradiation.J. H. O. Varley - 1962 - Philosophical Magazine 7 (74):301-313.
  26.  16
    Internal Clocks and the Representation of Time.J. H. Wearden - 2001 - In Christoph Hoerl & Teresa McCormark (eds.), Time and Memory. Oxford University Press. pp. 37--58.
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  27.  21
    Comparing and Validating Methods of Reading Instruction Using Behavioural and Neural Findings in an Artificial Orthography.J. S. H. Taylor, Matthew H. Davis & Kathleen Rastle - 2017 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 146 (6):826-858.
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  28. The Life of Immanuel Kant.J. H. W. Stuckenberg - 1882 - Upa.
    Very few biographies of Kant exist. The Neo-Kantian movement renewed interest in his life. During the last half of the 19th century, John Henry Wilbrandt Stuckenberg (...)provided an eminently readable biography of Kant, as seen from a sympathetic, yet detached viewpoint. (shrink)
     
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  29.  30
    Peter Geach: Philosophical Encounters.J. H. J. & Harry A. Lewis - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 41 (165):516.
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  30. Biology and Physics.J. H. Woodger - 1960 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (42):89-100.
  31.  10
    The Herdsman of the Dead . By J. H. Croon. Pp. Ix + 112. Utrecht: H. de Vroede, 1952. 12s. 6d.L. H. Jeffery & J. H. Croon - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:177-178.
  32.  8
    Lehrbuch der Geschichte der Philosophie.J. H. Tufts - 1904 - Philosophical Review 13 (6):706-707.
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  33. What Do We Mean by 'Inborn'?J. H. Woodger - 1952 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 3 (12):319-326.
  34. Logic, Semantics, Metamathematics Papers From 1923 to 1938.Alfred Tarski & J. H. Woodger - 1956 - Clarendon Press.
     
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  35. Mantinband, J. H., Dictionary of Latin Literature.H. W. Miller - 1956 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 50:71.
     
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  36.  58
    The Moral Psychology of the Virtues.N. J. H. Dent - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
    This part of the philosophy of psychology I refer to as 'moral psychology'; and, therefore, this book is offered as a contribution to moral psychology. ...
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  37.  30
    J. H. Hexter, Neo-Whiggism And Early Stuart Historiography.William H. Dray - 1987 - History and Theory 26 (2):133-149.
    J. H. Hexter, an American historian of early seventeenth-century history, terms himself whiggish and claims whiggishness is returning after the misguided popularity of Marxism. The distinction " (...)whiggish" is more elusive than his claim suggests, and the accuracy of its application to Hexter's claim is unclear. Three characteristics commonly assigned to whig interpretation by its critics can be seen as reflections of broader, unresolved historical issues. These are: attention to political and constitutional issues; a tendency to refer to the present in interpreting the past; and a belief in inevitability. It is difficult to ascertain whether Hexter's attention to political matters is a result of his view of them as intrinsically important to historical inquiry or as particularly relevant to historical accounts of Stuart England. The charge of presentism cannot confidently be made against him, as he is not guilty of anything as crude as anachronism, and subtle presentism is neither avoidable nor necessarily reprehensible. Inevitabilism is not only difficult to define, it is not displayed by Hexter. If he displays the weaknesses of whiggishness it is only through implication, in the body of ideas underlying his text. (shrink)
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  38.  10
    The Optical Researches of Ibn Al-Haitham.H. J. J. Winter - 1953 - Centaurus 3 (1):190-210.
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  39.  83
    The Origin of Agency, Consciousness, and Free Will.J. H. van Hateren - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):979-1000.
    Living organisms appear to have agency, the ability to act freely, and humans appear to have free will, the ability to rationally decide what to do. However, (...)
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  40.  7
    The Arabic Optical Mss. In the British Isles.H. J. J. Winter - 1956 - Centaurus 5 (1):73-88.
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  41.  33
    Many-Termed Relations in Biology.J. H. Woodger - 1968 - Acta Biotheoretica 18 (1-4):125-132.
  42.  71
    Bentham and Blackstone: A Lifetime's Dialectic*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):22-40.
    The full range of Bentham's engagement with Blackstone's view of law is beyond the scope of a single article. Yet it is important to recognize at (...) the outset, even in a more restricted enquiry into the matter, that the engagement, begun when Bentham, not quite sixteen years of age, started to attend Blackstone's Oxford lectures, was indeed a lifelong affair. Whatever Bentham had in mind when, at the age of eighty, in 1828, he began to write a work entitledA familar view of Blackstone: or say Blackstone familiarized’, the manuscripts at least suffice to prove thatOur Authorwas still in the forefront of his mind at that octogenarian but still indefatigably active stage of his career. Every aspect of Bentham's multifarious intellectual activity over the intervening decades had been touched in some measure by his response to Blackstone's ideas. It still seems true to say what was said a dozen years ago: It would be an exaggeration to say that Bentham elaborated his own conception of law by way of a constant and conscious dialectic with the views of Blackstone. But it would be an exaggeration for which the evidence would afford some excuse. (shrink)
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  43.  85
    John M. Robson 19271995: A Tribute: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1996 - Utilitas 8 (1):1-4.
    By the death, last summer, of Jack Robson, the world of utilitarian studies and a wider world of scholarship on both sides of the Atlantic lost one (...)
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  44.  12
    Reality and Value: An Introduction to Metaphysics and an Essay on the Theory of Value. By J. H. Muirhead.J. H. Muirhead - 1937 - Ethics 48 (3):447-450.
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  45. La question de la performance globale. La performance économique en entreprise. J.-H. Jacot and J.-P. Micaelli. Paris.J. H. Jacot - forthcoming - Hermes.
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  46.  29
    The Will to Fuller Life. By J. H. Badley, Headmaster of Bedales School. (London: George Allen & Unwin Ltd. 1933. Pp. 282. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW]J. H. Muirhead - 1934 - Philosophy 9 (34):229-.
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  47.  18
    Malina, B J & Neyrey, J H - Portraits of Paul: An Archaeology of Ancient Personality.B. J. Malina & J. H. Neyrey - 1998 - Hts Theological Studies 54 (1/2).
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  48.  22
    Some Reminiscences by the Late J. H. Muirhead.J. H. Muirhead - 1942 - Philosophy 17 (68):334 - 350.
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  49.  2
    The Platonic Tradition in Anglo-Saxon Philosophy. By J. H. Tufts[REVIEW]J. H. Tufts - 1932 - Ethics 43:65.
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  50.  15
    De Kerkbeschouwing van Prof. Dr J. H. Gunning.J. H. Semmelink - 1956 - Hts Theological Studies 12 (1).
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