Results for 'James S. Risbey'

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  1. Reading Anna J. Cooper with William James: Black Feminist Visionary Pragmatism, Philosophy's Culture of Justification, and Belief.V. Denise James - 2013 - The Pluralist 8 (3):32-45.
    When William James spoke about belief to the philosophy clubs of Yale and Brown in 1896, he forewarned his audience of the nature of his comments by describing them as a “sermon on justification by faith” (James 13), titling the talk “The Will to Believe.” Although there is disagreement about the substance of James’s remarks, it is fairly innocuous to assert that James thought they were appropriate because of the prevalence of the “logical spirit” of many (...)
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  2. William James's Radical Reconstruction of Philosophy.William James & Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1992 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (1):145-156.
     
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  3. William James's Philosophy: A New Perspective.William James & Marcus Peter Ford - 1982 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 19 (1):111-115.
     
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  4.  9
    Pascal’s Wagers and James’s Will to Believe.Jeff Jordan - 2005 - In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. pp. 168-187.
    Pragmatic arguments seek to justify the performance of an action by appealing to the benefits that may follow from that action. Pascal’s wager, for instance, argues that one should inculcate belief in God because there is everything to gain and little to lose by doing do. In this chapter I critically examine Pascal’s wager and William James’s famous “Will-to-Believe” argument by first explaining the logic of each argument and then by surveying the objections commonly arrayed against them. Finally, I (...)
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  5.  42
    Gerrie ter Haar Oi James J. Busuttil (Eds.), The Freedom to Do God's Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change.Roxana Havrici - 2005 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):244-245.
    Gerrie ter Haar oi James J. Busuttil (eds.), The Freedom to Do God’s Will. Religious Fundamentalism and Social Change Routledge, London and New York, 2003.
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  6. James's Will-to-Believe Doctrine.James C. S. Wernham - 1987 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In 1896 William James published an essay entitled The Will to Believe, in which he defended the legitimacy of religious faith against the attacks of such champions of scientific method as W.K. Clifford and Thomas Huxley. James's work quickly became one of the most important writings in the philosophy of religious belief. James Wernham analyses James's arguments, discusses his relation to Pascal and Renouvier, and considers the interpretations, and misinterpretations, of James's major critics. Wernham shows (...)
     
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  7. A Chronicle of Pragmatism in France Before 1907: William James in Renouvier’s Critique Philosophique.Mathias Girel - 2007 - In Sergio Franzese (ed.), Fringes of Religious Experience, Cross-Perspectives on James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Ontos Verlag. pp. 169-200.
    In this paper, I'm giving an account of William James's reception in the columns of Charles Renouvier's journal, La Critique philosophique. The papers explores the discussions between James and Renouvier on Free Will, Philosophical systems, Consciousness and Pluralism.
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  8. Heaven’s Champion: William James’s Philosophy of Religion.James O. Pawelski - 1996 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 15 (1):56-61.
    William James is notorious for the large number of inconsistencies and at least apparent contradictions in his writings. Many readers conclude that he should be appreciated more for his profound but erratic insights than for any coherent philosophical perspective. Ellen Kappy Suckiel disagrees. She argues that James is far more careful and systematic than many readers realize. Her work on James is guided by the attempt to lay bare his coherent philosophical vision and the consistent philosophical methodology (...)
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  9. The Metaphysics and Logic of Psychology: Peirce's Reading of James's Principles.Mathias Girel - 2003 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (2):163-203.
    The present paper deals thus with some fundamental agreements and disagreements between Peirce and James, on crucial issues such as perception and consciousness. When Peirce first read the Principles, he was sketching his theory of the categories, testing its applications in many fields of knowledge, and many investigations were launched, concerning indexicals, diagrams, growth and development. James's utterances led Peirce to make his own views clearer on a wide range of topics that go to the heart of the (...)
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  10.  55
    William James's "The Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation.Jennifer Welchman - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    William James's 'The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of sug­ gesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics con­ tinue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" con­ fuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs-not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional (...)
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  11. The Unity of William James's Thought.Wesley Cooper - 2002 - Vanderbilt University Press.
    Wesley Cooper opposes the traditional view of William Jamesís philosophy which dismissed it as fragmented or merely popular, arguing instead that there is a systematic philosophy to be found in James's writings. His doctrine of pure experience is the binding thread that links his earlier psychological theorizing to his later epistemological, religious, and pragmatic concerns.
     
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  12. William James's "the Will to Believe" and the Ethics of Self-Experimentation.Jennifer Welchman - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):229-241.
    : William James's "The Will to Believe" has been criticized for offering untenable arguments in support of belief in unvalidated hypotheses. Although James is no longer accused of suggesting we can create belief ex nihilo, critics continue to charge that James's defense of belief in what he called the "religious hypothesis" confuses belief with hypothesis adoption and endorses willful persistence in unvalidated beliefs—not, as he claimed, in pursuit of truth, but merely to avoid the emotional stress of (...)
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  13.  86
    James's Empirical Assumptions.Henry Jackman - 2004 - Streams of William James 6 (1):23-27.
    Those sympathetic to the naturalistic side of James hope that his critique of ‘philosophical materialism’ can be separated from those elements of his thinking that are essential to his pragmatism. Such a separation is possible once we see that James’s critique of materialism grows out of his views about its incompatibility with the existence of objective values. Objective values (as James understands them) are incompatible, however, not with materialism in its most general form, but rather with materialism (...)
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  14.  59
    Mankind's Own Providence: From Swedenborgian Philosophy of Use to William James's Pragmatism.Paul Jerome Croce - 2007 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (3):490 - 508.
    : It is part of the conventional wisdom about the James family that the elder Henry James (1811–82) had a large influence on his son, William James (1842–1910), in the direction of religious interests. But William neither adopted his father's spirituality nor did he regard it as a foil to his own secularity. Instead, after first rejecting the elder James's idiosyncratic faith, he became increasingly intrigued with his insights into the natural world, which were in turn (...)
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  15.  29
    James's Pragmatism and American Culture, 1907-2007.James T. Kloppenberg - 2009 - In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  16. Divide Et Impera! William James’s Pragmatist Tradition in the Philosophy of Science.Alexander Klein - 2008 - Philosophical Topics 36 (1):129-166.
    ABSTRACT. May scientists rely on substantive, a priori presuppositions? Quinean naturalists say "no," but Michael Friedman and others claim that such a view cannot be squared with the actual history of science. To make his case, Friedman offers Newton's universal law of gravitation and Einstein's theory of relativity as examples of admired theories that both employ presuppositions (usually of a mathematical nature), presuppositions that do not face empirical evidence directly. In fact, Friedman claims that the use of such presuppositions is (...)
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  17.  43
    William James's Objection to Epiphenomenalism.Alexander Klein - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 5 (86):1179–1190.
    James developed an evolutionary objection to epiphenomenalism that is still discussed today. Epiphenomenalists have offered responses that do not grasp its full depth. I thus offer a new reading and assessment of James’s objection. Our life-essential, phenomenal pleasures and pains have three features that suggest that they were shaped by selection, according to James: they are natively patterned, those patterns are systematically linked with antecedent brain states, and the patterns are “universal” among humans. If epiphenomenalism were true, (...)
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  18. James's Will-to-Believe Doctrine: A Heretical View.James C. S. Wernham - 1988 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 24 (3):423-427.
     
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  19.  66
    Review: Lynn Bridgers. Contemporary Varieties of Religious Experience: James's Classic Study in Light of Resiliency, Temperament, and Trauma. Rowman & Littlefield, 2005. [REVIEW]Sami Pihlström - 2006 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (3):454-458.
    Pihlstrom's review of Lynn Bridges book on James, The Varieties of Religious Experience and contemporary varieties.
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  20. Philosophy as Teaching: James's "Knight Errant," Thomas Davidson.Douglas R. Anderson - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (3):239-247.
    In 1905 William James wrote an essay in McClure's Magazine recalling the importance to his own work of the Scottish-born philosopher Thomas Davidson. In the essay, James states that Davidson was "essentially a teacher." What is interesting when one looks at Davidson's life and work is that, for Davidson, teaching does seem to be an essential feature of what it means to be a philosopher. Here, I develop how Davidson construes this linking of philosophy and teaching with a (...)
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  21. Teaching James’s “The Will to Believe”.Guy Axtell - 2001 - Teaching Philosophy 24 (4):325-345.
    William James’s lecture “The Will to Believe” presents his pragmatic “defense” of religious beliefs, one aimed at rebutting W. K. Clifford’s famous evidentialist principle that “It is always wrong, always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything on insufficient evidence.” This paper presents a number of classroom tools and techniques for teaching James’s lecture, for contrasting it against arguments for God’s existence, and for positioning his lecture in a broader context of the “ethics of belief.” In addition to (...)
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  22.  57
    Review of Sergio Franzese, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus[REVIEW]Kenneth W. Stikkers - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (5).
    Every scholar and reader of William James is aware of his frequent uses of "energy," especially in his discussions of ethics and most notably in his 1906 Presidential Address to the American Philosophical Association, "The Energies of Men".[1] But while other interpretations treat James's use of "energy" as merely one of his several folksy metaphors, The Ethics of Energy: William James's Moral Philosophy in Focus is the first monograph, as its author, Sergio Franzese, rightly claims, to focus (...)
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  23.  37
    Experiments with Truth. A Sociological Variation on William James's Varieties of Religious Experience.Frédéric Vandenberghe - 2018 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 48 (1):31-47.
    William James's Varieties of Religious Experience is a classic psycho-philosophical study of the experience of the sacred and of its practical effects on the ordinary life of extraordinary persons. In a pragmatic variation of Kant's proof of god's existence, James uses personal accounts of converts to empirically demonstrate that there's “something” that has causal effects on the well-being of the person. While the article is largely sympathetic to James explorations of the mystical, it offers a sociological variation (...)
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  24. William James's Theory of Mind.W. E. Cooper - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy (October) 571 (October):571-593.
    Neutral monist, panpsychist, naturalist, and phenomenological interpretations of James's theory of mind are canvassed. Culling the true tenets from each, I make a case for a reconciling view on the basis of a distinction between mental and proto-mental properties. The resulting interpretation is compared to two forms of panpsychism identified by T Nagel in his essay of that name.
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  25. Wittgenstein & James's Stream of Thought.Henry Jackman - manuscript
    William James has been characterized as “the major whipping boy of the later Wittgenstein,” and the currency of this impression of the relation between James and Wittgenstein is understandable. Reading Wittgenstein and his commentators can leave one with the impression that James was a badly muddled “exponent of the tradition in the philosophy of mind that [Wittgenstein] was opposing.” There have been recent attempts to resist this trend, but even these tend to focus on the affinities between (...)
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  26. William James's Naturalistic Account of Concepts and His 'Rejection of Logic'.Henry Jackman - 2018 - In Philosophy of Mind in the Nineteenth Century: The History of the Philosophy of Mind, Volume 5. New York: Routledge. pp. 133-146.
    William James was one of the most controversial philosophers of the early part of the 20 century, and his apparent skepticism about logic and any robust conception of truth was often simply attributed to his endorsing mysticism and irrationality out of an overwhelming desire to make room for religion in his world-view. However, it will be argued here that James’s pessimism about logic and even truth (or at least ‘absolute’ truth), while most prominent in his later views, stem (...)
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  27.  51
    William James’s Concrete Analysis of Experience.Charlene Haddock Seigfried - 1992 - The Monist 75 (4):538-550.
    There are no signs of waning interest in William James's classic work, The Principles of Psychology as we enter the second century after its original publication in 1890. I think the time is right for undertaking the task of reconstructing his psychology, that is, his concrete or phenomenal findings, in light of his radically empiricist philosophical insights. The immediate problem for such a reappropriation is that James sharply distinguished between scientifically neutral descriptions of reality, such as are found (...)
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  28.  31
    Heaven’s Champion: William James’s Philosophy of Religion.Ellen Kappy Suckiel - 1996 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Suckiel offers readers a new perspective on James. For those interested in the philosophy of religion in general, and James’s views in particular, this work will be of considerable interest.
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  29. On the Temporal Continuity of Human Consciousness: Is James's Firsthand Description, After All, "Inept"?Thomas Natsoulas - 2006 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (2):121-148.
    Contrary to James's emphasis on the sensible continuity of each personal consciousness, our purported "stream," as it presents itself to us, is not accurately described as having a flowing temporal structure; thus Strawson has argued based on how he finds his own consciousness to be. Accordingly, qua object of inner awareness, our consciousness is best characterized as constituted successively by pulses of consciousness separated in time, one from the next, by a momentary state of complete unconsciousness. It seems at (...)
     
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  30. The Concrete State: The Basic Components of James's Stream of Consciousness.Thomas Natsoulas - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (4):427-449.
    The basic components of James’s stream of consciousness are considered concretely and in a way that tends to be relatively neutral from a theoretical perspective. My ultimate goal is a general description of the states of consciousness, but I try here to be more “observational” than “theoretical” about them. Giving attention to James’s reports of his personal firsthand evidence, I proceed as though I were conversing with this most phenomenological and radically empirical of psychological authors. I disagree with (...)
     
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  31.  8
    Pluralism and Dialectic: On James's Relation to Hegel.Lucy Christine Schultz - 2015 - Hegel Bulletin 36 (2):202-224.
    In this paper James’s pluralism is examined in light of his critiques of ‘intellectualism’ and monistic idealism in order to elucidate his relationship to Hegel. Contrary to the strong anti-Hegelianism found throughout the writings of James, Hegel’s dialectic and speculative logic are able to give a rational account of the continuity of objects and relations within experience that James struggled to articulate in A Pluralistic Universe. Neither James nor Hegel is an absolute pluralist or monist due (...)
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  32.  45
    'The Spatial Quale': A Corrective to James's Radical Empiricism.Brenda Jubin - 1977 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 15 (2):212-216.
    "Space," William James confessed, "is [both] a direfully difficult subject [and the] driest of subjects.'" Nonetheless, convinced that most previous accounts of space were either incoherent or mythological, he set out to describe space as it is actually experienced. His first effort, "The Spatial Quale," appeared in The Journal of Speculative Philosophy in 1879. 2 This article is historically important; as Ralph Barton Perry notes, "his peculiar view of the amplitude and eonnectedness of experience seems to have begun with (...)
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  33.  43
    On the Intrinsic Nature of States of Consciousness: Further Considerations in the Light of James's Conception.Thomas Natsoulas - 2000 - Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):139-166.
    How are the states of consciousness intrinsically so that they all qualify as ?feelings? in William James?s generic sense? Only a small, propaedeutic part of what is required to address the intrinsic nature of such states can be accomplished here. I restrict my topic mainly to a certain characteristic that belongs to each of those pulses of mentality that successively make up James?s stream of consciousness. Certain statements of James?s are intended to pick out the variable ?width? (...)
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  34.  35
    William James's Pragmatism : A Distinctly Mixed Bag.Bruce Wilshire - 2009 - In John J. Stuhr (ed.), 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  35.  15
    Looking Toward Last Things : James's Pragmatism Beyond its First Century.John J. Stuhr - 2009 - In 100 Years of Pragmatism: William James's Revolutionary Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  36. The Case for Intrinsic Theory V: Some Arguments From James's Varieties.Thomas Natsoulas - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (1):41-67.
    This and the planned next article of the present series mine the wealth of reports and astute discussions of states of consciousness contained in William James’s The Varieties of Religious Experience. Thus, I bring out further arguments in favor of the kind of understanding of consciousness4, or inner awareness, that, as it happens, James explicitly opposed in The Principles of Psychology. The alternative, appendage kind of account that James advanced there for consciousness4 stands in marked contrast to (...)
     
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  37. Levinas's Empiricism and James's Phenomenology.Randy L. Friedman - 2012 - Journal of Scriptural Reasoning 11 (2).
    Genealogies in philosophy can be tricky and even a little dangerous. Lines of influence and inheritance run much more linearly on paper than in reality. I am often reminded of Robert Frost's "Mending Walls" and the attention that must be paid to what is being walled in and what is being walled out. In other words, William James and Emmanuel Levinas are not natural conversation partners. I have always read James as a fellow traveler of Edmund Husserl, and (...)
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  38.  31
    A Non-Fideistic Reading of William James's "The Will to Believe".Ruth Weintraub - 2003 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 20 (1):103 - 121.
    William James’ declared intention is to oppose Clifford’s claim that it “is wrong always, everywhere, and for every one, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence”. But I argue that he is confused about his doxastic prescriptions. He isn’t primarily concerned, as he thinks he is, with the legitimacy of belief in the absence of sufficient evidence. The most important contribution of his essay is a suggestion - a highly insightful and contentious one - as to what it is to (...)
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  39.  66
    An Inchoate Universe: James's Probabilistic Underdeterminism.Kyle Bromhall - 2018 - William James Studies 14 (1):54-83.
    In this paper, I challenge the traditional narrative that William James’s arguments against determinism were primarily motivated by his personal struggles with depression. I argue that James presents an alternative argument against determinism that is motivated by his commitment to sound scientific practice. James argues that determinism illegitimately extrapolates from observations of past events to predictions about future events without acknowledging the distinct metaphysical difference between them. This occupation with futurity suggests that James’s true target is (...)
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  40.  55
    Il sondaggio deliberativo di James S. Fishkin.Luca Corchia - 2007 - The Lab's Quarterly 8 (1):1-20.
    I rapporti annuali su Gli italiani e lo stato, coordinati da Ilvo Diamanti, continuano a rilevare che i cittadini sono impegnati negli associazionismi ma disincantati dalla politica. Con le tipiche differenze nelle diverse aree del paese e a seconda del livello istituzionale, accanto alla sfiducia verso le istituzioni pubbliche c’è una propensione alla partecipazione. Come mostrano la diffusione delle primarie e le esperienze di democrazia partecipativa che si moltiplicano a livello locale, si riscontra, infatti, una disponibilità a sperimentare forme di (...)
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  41.  21
    C.L.R. James’s Decolonial Humanism in Theory and Practice.Alyssa Adamson - 2018 - Clr James Journal 24 (1):153-176.
    This paper argues for the concept of a decolonial humanism at the heart of C.L.R. James’s theoretical and political engagements. In exploring the concept of decolonial humanism, the paper moves through three major sections dealing with some of the definitive epistemic and political aspects of James’s work: a critique of Enlightenment Humanism and European Marxism without disavowing the aspirations of universal human emancipation; James’s work with the Johnson-Forest Tendency, the Pan-Africanist movement, and his attempts at labor organizing (...)
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  42. What to Make of James's Genetic Theory of Truth?David Lamberth - 2009 - William James Studies 4:1-20.
    This Presidential Address to the 2008 Annual Meeting of the William James Society pursues an overlooked avenue to understanding what James might have intended by his claim in Pragmatism to offer a “genetic theory of what is meant by truth.” The author argues that we can plausibly interpret this specific claim of James by appealing to Hermann Lotze’s conception of “genetic definition,” explicated in his 1874 Logik, which James read and annotated closely. The essay concludes by (...)
     
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  43.  16
    Bargaining, Justice, and Justification: Towards Reconstruction: JAMES S. FISHKIN.James S. Fishkin - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 5 (2):46-64.
    Part I of this essay will be devoted to Gauthier's principle of minimax relative concession. Part II will focus, more generally, on the variety of possible strategies available to liberal theory. In Part I, I will argue that the principle of minimax relative concession does not define “essential justice” as Gauthier claims. In Part II, I will argue that the difficulties facing Gauthier's strategy are common to other strategies of die same general kind. I will close by suggesting what I (...)
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  44.  34
    James's Theory of Truth as a Theory of Knowledge.Michael D. Bybee - 1984 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 20 (3):253 - 267.
    The object of james's theory of truth is knowledge, not truth "qua" correctness. to designate the object of his theory, james avoids using traditional english terminology for correctness but often uses diction typically reserved for knowledge. furthermore, the object of james's theory (as he describes it) cannot be distinguished from knowledge on philosophical grounds.
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  45.  28
    The Will to Believe" and James's "Deontological Streak.Robert J. O'Connell - 1992 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 28 (4):809 - 831.
    James's ethical thought could frequently be consequentialist, but it could also on occasion show a deontological side, or "streak," as I contended in "William James on the Courage to Believe". This shows up when he speaks of the "strenuous" as against the "easy-going" moral mood, in "The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life," and it preserves the precursive intervention of our "passional natures" in "The Will to Believe" from lapsing into "wishful thinking." Toned down slightly, perhaps, in "Varieties (...)
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  46.  29
    James's Theory of Fringes.Christopher J. Broniak - 1996 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (3):443 - 468.
    The purpose of this article is to present a more thoroughgoing account of what James means by the fringes of perceptual objects. The first section presents James's account of fringes of objects of consciousness within the context of his celebrated analogy of the stream of the fringe phenomenon for perception. It concludes by proposing a preliminary "working" definition of the concept "fringe": fringes are active bridges of associations (logical, psychological, etc.) from what is perceptually immediate but ambiguous to (...)
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  47.  20
    James’s Evolutionary Argument.William S. Robinson - 2014 - Disputatio 6 (39):229-237.
    This paper is a commentary on Joseph Corabi’s “The Misuse and Failure of the Evolutionary Argument”, this Journal, vol. VI, No. 39; pp. 199-227. It defends William James’s formulation of the evolutionary argument against charges such as mishandling of evidence. Although there are ways of attacking James’s argument, it remains formidable, and Corabi’s suggested revision is not an improvement on James’s statement of it.
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  48.  35
    William James's Semantics of "Truth".Richard M. Gale - 1997 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 33 (4):863 - 898.
    James's most original and important contribution was his moralizing of epistemology, in particular belief-acceptance and truth. We are always to believe in a way that maximizes desire-satisfaction, with a proposition counting as true when a belief in it maximizes desire-satisfaction. The theory of truth that falls out of James's pragmatic theory of meaning must be downgraded to a theory of when a proposition is epistemology warranted, thus the reason for the scare-quotation marks around "Truth" in the title of (...)
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  49.  5
    James's Critiques of the Freudian Unconscious- 25 Years Earlier.Eric Thomas Weber - 2012 - William James Studies 9 (1).
    In The Principles of Psychology, William James addressed ten justifications for the concept of the unconscious mind, each of which he refuted. Twenty – five years later in The Unconscious, Freud presented many of the same, original arguments to justify the unconscious, without any acknowledgement of James’s refutations. Some scholars in the last few decades have claimed that James was in fact a supporter of a Freudian unconscious, contrary to expectations. In this essay, I first summarize Freud’s (...)
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  50.  20
    William James's Hidden Religious Imagination: A Universe of Relations by Jeremy Carrette.Sarin Marchetti & Alan Rosenberg - 2014 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 50 (2):313-317.
    Jeremy Carrette is one of the most interesting contemporary scholars writing on James’s philosophy of religious experience. In the present volume the author expands and deepens the scope of his previous researches by investigating the epistemological and metaphysical dimensions of James’s work on religion. The resulting interpretation is an sophisticated and ambitious one: Carrette argues that most accounts of James’s writings on religion—and of his thought as a whole—have been vitiated by a “disciplinary closure” which conceals (...)’s unbroken effort to “sustain a conversation across the disciplinary spaces of philosophy, psychology and the study of religion” . Contrary to this approach, Carrette claims how .. (shrink)
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