Results for 'Stephen T. Casper'

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  1.  4
    Stephen T. Casper. The Neurologists: A History of a Medical Speciality in Modern Britain, C. 1789–2000. Xvii + 270 Pp., Fig., Tables, Bibl., Index. Manchester/New York: Manchester University Press, 2014. £65. [REVIEW]Samuel H. Greenblatt - 2016 - Isis 107 (4):872-873.
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  2.  13
    Stephen T. Casper and Delia Gavrus, The History of the Brain and Mind Sciences. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press, 2017. Pp. 310. ISBN 978-1-5800-46595-3. £95.00. [REVIEW]Roger Smith - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Science 51 (3):531-532.
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  3. Response to Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller.Chris Renwick - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):515-521.
    Stephen T. Casper and Steve Fuller’s commentaries on my paper “Completing Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at the London School of Economics during the 1930s” raises important questions about the historical entanglement of the political left, welfarism, biology, and social science. In this response, I clarify questions about my analysis of events at the London School of Economics in the early twentieth century and identify ways in which they are important in the present. (...)
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  4.  7
    L. Stephen Jacyna;, Stephen T. Casper . The Neurological Patient in History. Vii + 264 Pp., Illus., App., Bibl., Index. Rochester, N.Y.: University of Rochester Press, 2012. $75. [REVIEW]Andrew Scull - 2014 - Isis 105 (1):234-235.
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  5.  32
    History and Neuroscience: An Integrative Legacy.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Isis 105 (1):123-132.
    The attitudes that characterize the contemporary “neuro-turn” were strikingly commonplace as part of the self-fashioning of social identity in the biographies and personal papers of past neurologists and neuroscientists. Indeed, one fundamental connection between nineteenth- and twentieth-century neurology and contemporary neuroscience appears to be the value that workers in both domains attach to the idea of integration, a vision of neural science and medicine that connected reductionist science to broader inquiries about the mind, brain, and human nature and in so (...)
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  6.  24
    A History of the Locked-In-Syndrome: Ethics in the Making of Neurological Consciousness, 1880-Present.Stephen T. Casper - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):145-161.
    Extensive scholarship has described the historical and ethical imperatives shaping the emergence of the brain death criteria in the 1960s and 1970s. This essay explores the longer intellectual history that shaped theories of neurological consciousness from the late-nineteenth century to that period, and argues that a significant transformation occurred in the elaboration of those theories in the 1960s and after, the period when various disturbances of consciousness were discovered or thoroughly elaborated. Numerous historical conditions can be identified and attributed to (...)
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  7.  25
    Andrew Scull. Madness in Civilization: A Cultural History of Insanity From the Bible to Freud, From the Madhouse to Modern Medicine. 448 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. London: Thames & Hudson, 2015. £28. [REVIEW]Stephen T. Casper - 2016 - Isis 107 (3):608-609.
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  8. Chickens and Eggs: A Commentary on Chris Renwick’s “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” and (...)
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  9.  5
    Chickens and Eggs: A Commentary on Chris Renwick’s “Completing the Circle of the Social Sciences? William Beveridge and Social Biology at London School of Economics During the 1930s”.Stephen T. Casper - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (4):506-514.
    Why would anyone want there to be natural foundations for the social sciences? In a provocative essay exploring precisely that question, historian Chris Renwick uses an interwar debate featuring William Beveridge, Lancelot Hogben, and Friedrich Hayek to begin to imagine what might have been had such a program calling for biological knowledge to form the natural bases of the social sciences been realized at the London School of Economics. Yet perhaps Renwick grants too much attention to differences and “what-ifs” and (...)
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  10.  22
    Emil du Bois-Reymond and the Tradition of German Physiological Science: Gabriel Finkelstein: Emil du Bois-Reymond: Neuroscience, Self, and Society in Nineteenth-Century Germany. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2013, 384pp, $38.00, £26.95 HB.Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Metascience 24 (1):85-86.
    In 1872, Emil du Bois-Reymond delivered an astonishing lecture entitled “The Limits of Science” at a Congress of German Scientists and Physicians in Leipzig. No stranger to polemic and bellicose oratory, and possessing among his generation of physiologists unmatched rhetorical abilities, du Bois-Reymond had already attracted much public recognition and acclaim for his denigration of French culture at a time when belligerence and competition between Prussia and France had peaked. Yet, the topic of his 1872 lecture had a signal significance (...)
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  11.  7
    John Burnham.Stephen T. Casper - 2018 - Isis 109 (1):140-142.
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  12.  18
    Of Means and Ends: Mind and Brain Science in the Twentieth Century.Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):1-7.
    What role does context play in the mind and brain sciences? This introductory article, “Of Means and Ends,” explores that question through its focus on the ways scientists and physicians engaged with and constructed technology in the mind and brain sciences in the twentieth century. This topical issue addresses how scientists, physicians, and psychologists came to see the ends of technology as important in-and-of themselves. In so doing, the authors of these essays offer an interpretation of historian Paul Forman's revisionist (...)
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  13.  25
    Reductionism in Epigenetics.Stephen T. Casper - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (1):132-135.
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  14.  1
    “With Hindsight, I See That I Was Right”: John C. Burnham’s Final Words, as Recounted by a Trickster.Stephen T. Casper - 2019 - Isis 110 (4):792-795.
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  15.  31
    Of Psychometric Means: Starke R. Hathaway and the Popularization of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory.Rebecca Schilling & Stephen T. Casper - 2015 - Science in Context 28 (1):77-98.
    ArgumentThe Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was developed at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, in the 1930s and 1940s. It became a highly successful and highly controversial psychometric tool. In professional terms, psychometric tools such as the MMPI transformed psychology and psychiatry. Psychometric instruments thus readily fit into the developmental history of psychology, psychiatry, and neurology; they were a significant part of the narrative of those fields’ advances in understanding, intervening, and treating people with mental illnesses. At the same time, the (...)
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  16.  21
    Pascal on Self-Caused Belief: STEPHEN T. DAVIS.Stephen T. Davis - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (1):27-37.
    Let me begin with a true story. Years ago, early in my career as a professor of philosophy, I had a fascinating series of conversations with a student whom I will call Peter. He was a bright and incisive senior, with a double major in philosophy and psychology. Raised in a religious family, the son of a Christian minister, he was himself unable to believe. His doubts were too strong. But the odd fact was that he genuinely wanted to believe. (...)
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  17. Against Fairness.Stephen T. Asma - 2012 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
    From the school yard to the workplace, there’s no charge more damning than “you’re being unfair!” Born out of democracy and raised in open markets, fairness has become our de facto modern creed. The very symbol of American ethics—Lady Justice—wears a blindfold as she weighs the law on her impartial scale. In our zealous pursuit of fairness, we have banished our urges to like one person more than another, one thing over another, hiding them away as dirty secrets of our (...)
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  18.  24
    A Defence of the Free Will Defence: STEPHEN T. DAVIS.Stephen T. Davis - 1972 - Religious Studies 8 (4):335-344.
    In this paper I shall discuss a certain theodicy, or line of argument in response to the problem of evil, viz, the so-called ‘free will defence’. What I propose to do is defend this theodicy against an objection that has been made to it in recent years.
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  19.  42
    Divine Omniscience and Human Freedom: STEPHEN T. DAVIS.Stephen T. Davis - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (3):303-316.
    Theists typically believe the following two propositions: God is omniscient, and Human beings are free. Are they consistent? In order to decide, we must first ask what they mean. Roughly, let us say that a being is omniscient if for any proposition he knows whether it is true or false. Since I have no wish to deny that there are true and false propositions about future states of affairs , omniscience includes foreknowledge, which we can say is knowledge of the (...)
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  20. Craig on the Resurrection: A Defense.Stephen T. Davis - 2020 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2 (1):28-35.
    This article is a rebuttal to Robert G. Cavin and Carlos A. Colombetti’s article, “Assessing the Resurrection Hypothesis: Problems with Craig’s Inference to the Best Explanation,” which argues that the Standard Model of current particle physics entails that non-physical things (like a supernatural God or a supernaturally resurrected body) can have no causal contact with the physical universe. As such, they argue that William Lane Craig’s resurrection hypothesis is not only incompatible with the notion of Jesus physically appearing to the (...)
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  21.  48
    The Financialisation of Business Ethics.Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne & Casper Hoedemaekers - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (1):102-117.
    Business schools have become implicated in the widespread demonisation of the financial classes. By educating those held most responsible for the crisis – financial traders and speculators – they are said to have produced ruthlessly talented graduates who have ambition in abundance but little sense for social responsibility or ethics. This ethical lack thrives upon the trading floor within a compelling critique of the complicity of the pedagogy of the business school with the financial crisis of the global economy. An (...)
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  22.  13
    The Financialisation of Business Ethics.Armin Beverungen, Stephen Dunne & Casper Hoedemaekers - 2013 - Business Ethics: A European Review 22 (1):102-117.
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  23. Following Form and Function: A Philosophical Archaeology of Life Science.Stephen T. Asma - 1996 - Northwestern University Press.
    The concepts of form and function have traditionally been defined in terms of biology and then extended to other disciplines. Stephen T. Asma examines the various interpretations of form and function in science and philosophy, reflecting on the philosophical presuppositions underlying the work of Geoffroy, Cuvier, Darwin, and others. -/- In the continental tradition of Canguilhem and Foucault, Asma's treatment of the historical form/function dispute analyzes the complex interactions among ideologies, metaphysical commitments, and research programs. Following Form and Function (...)
     
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  24.  20
    A Cognitive Model of Drug Urges and Drug-Use Behavior: Role of Automatic and Nonautomatic Processes.Stephen T. Tiffany - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (2):147-168.
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  25. The Incarnation.Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.) - 2002 - Oxford Up.
  26. Why We Need Religion.Stephen T. Asma - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press.
    How we feel is as vital to our survival as how we think. This claim, based on the premise that emotions are largely adaptive, serves as the organizing theme of Why We Need Religion. This book is a novel pathway in a well-trodden field of religious studies and philosophy of religion. Stephen Asma argues that, like art, religion has direct access to our emotional lives in ways that science does not. Yes, science can give us emotional feelings of wonder (...)
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  27. The Redemption.Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford Up.
  28. Stuffed Animals and Pickled Heads: The Culture and Evolution of Natural History Museums.Stephen T. Asma - 2002 - Journal of the History of Biology 35 (1):185-187.
  29.  38
    God, Reason and Theistic Proof.Stephen T. Davis - 1997 - Edinburgh University Press.
    How do we prove the existence of God? This book tackles head-on this fundamental question. It examines a cross-section of theistic proofs, explaining in clear terms what they are and what they try to accomplish.
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  30.  66
    On Preferring That God Not Exist : A Dialogue.Stephen T. Davis - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (2):143-159.
    Recently a new question has emerged in the philosophy of religion: not whether God exists, but whether God’s existence is or would be preferable. The existing literature on the subject is sparse. The present essay, in dialogue form, is an attempt to marshal and evaluate arguments on both sides.
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  31. The Implausibility and Low Explanatory Power of the Resurrection Hypothesis—With a Rejoinder to Stephen T. Davis.Robert Greg Cavin & Carlos A. Colombetti - 2020 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2 (1):37-94.
    We respond to Stephen T. Davis’ criticism of our earlier essay, “Assessing the Resurrection Hypothesis.” We argue that the Standard Model of physics is relevant and decisive in establishing the implausibility and low explanatory power of the Resurrection hypothesis. We also argue that the laws of physics have entailments regarding God and the supernatural and, against Alvin Plantinga, that these same laws lack the proviso “no agent supernaturally interferes.” Finally, we offer Bayesian arguments for the Legend hypothesis and against (...)
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  32. Christian Philosophical Theology.Stephen T. Davis - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Christian Philosophical Theology constitutes a Christian philosopher's look at various crucial topics in Christian theology, including belief in God, the nature of God, the Trinity, christology, the resurrection of Jesus, the general resurrection, redemption, and theological method. The book is tightly argued, and amounts to a coherent explanation of and case for the Christian world view. While the work is written from a broadly Reformed Protestant perspective and the author does not avoid controversial topics, the aim is to present a (...)
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  33.  23
    Against Fairness: Stephen T. Asma, 2012, University of Chicago Press.Paul T. Menzel - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):95-97.
    The book, Against Fairness, by philosopher Stephen T. Asma is reviewed. Concepts of favoritism and justice are explored.
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  34. The Trinity.Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  35. Physicalism and Resurrection.Stephen T. Davis - 2001 - In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  36. Christian Philosophical Theology.Stephen T. Davis - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Christian Philosophical Theology constitutes a Christian philosopher's look at various crucial topics in Christian theology, including belief in God, the nature of God, the Trinity, christology, the resurrection of Jesus, the general resurrection, redemption, and theological method. The book is tightly argued, and amounts to a coherent explanation of and case for the Christian world view. Although written from a broadly Reformed Protestant perspective, and although the author does not avoid controversial topics, his aim is to present a `merely Christian' (...)
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  37.  7
    Computational Psychometrics for the Measurement of Collaborative Problem Solving Skills.T. Polyak Stephen, A. von Davier Alina & Peterschmidt Kurt - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  38.  13
    Cartesian Omnipotence.Stephen T. Davis - 2017 - Philosophia Christi 19 (2):455-461.
    Let’s call “Cartesian omnipotence” the view that an omnipotent being can bring about any state of affairs at all, even logically impossible ones. The present paper explores what can be said in support of CO. It turns out that several powerful and interesting arguments can be given in its defense, although in the end, along with the vast majority of philosophers of religion, I reject it.
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  39. Does the Ontological Argument Beg the Question?Stephen T. Davis - 1976 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):433 - 442.
  40.  60
    Is It Possible to Know That Jesus Was Raised From the Dead?Stephen T. Davis - 1984 - Faith and Philosophy 1 (2):147-159.
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  41.  3
    Physicalism and Resurrection.Stephen T. Davis - 2001 - In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival: Essays on the Metaphysics of Human Persons. Cornell University Press.
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  42.  19
    Communication Among Phages, Bacteria, and Soil Environments.Stephen T. Abedon - 2011 - In Witzany (ed.), Biocommunication in Soil Microorganisms. Springer. pp. 37--65.
  43. Was Jesus Mad, Bad, or God?Stephen T. Davis - 2002 - In Stephen T. Davis, Daniel Kendall & Gerald O'Collins (eds.), The Incarnation. Oxford Up. pp. 221--5.
     
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  44.  26
    Revelation and Inspiration.Stephen T. Davis - 2008 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    This article considers the concepts of revelation and inspiration. The two notions are distinct but closely connected in Christian theology; they come together preeminently in discussions of the Bible. The purpose of revelation is to bring it about that humans come into a personal relationship with God, one that involves freely chosen love as well as worship and obedience. Inspiration is that influence of the Holy Spirit on the writing of the Bible which ensures that the words of its various (...)
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  45.  19
    Truth and Action in Theodicy: A Reply to C. Robert Mesle.Stephen T. Davis - 2004 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 25 (3):270 - 275.
  46.  82
    Environmental Influences on Ethical Decision Making: Climate and Environmental Predictors of Research Integrity.Michael D. Mumford, Stephen T. Murphy, Shane Connelly, Jason H. Hill, Alison L. Antes, Ryan P. Brown & Lynn D. Devenport - 2007 - Ethics and Behavior 17 (4):337 – 366.
    It is commonly held that early career experiences influence ethical behavior. One way early career experiences might operate is to influence the decisions people make when presented with problems that raise ethical concerns. To test this proposition, 102 first-year doctoral students were asked to complete a series of measures examining ethical decision making along with a series of measures examining environmental experiences and climate perceptions. Factoring of the environmental measure yielded five dimensions: professional leadership, poor coping, lack of rewards, limited (...)
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  47.  22
    Divine Omniscience and Human Freedom.Stephen T. Davis - 1979 - Religious Studies 15 (3):303 - 316.
  48. Metaphors of Race: Theoretical Presuppositions Behind Racism.Stephen T. Asma - 1995 - American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1):13 - 29.
    Philosophers and scientists have historically conceptualized race according to two main metaphors; internal differentiation (theological, philosophical and genetic), and external differentiation (environmental). This paper examines these metaphors and theories in Descartes, Kant, Hegel, and also Darwin and the subsequent racial theories of recent history. The paper argues that the externalist metaphor has a more liberal and potentially egalitarian tradition.
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  49.  3
    The Evolutionary Study of Human Family Systems.Stephen T. Emlen - 1997 - Social Science Information 36 (4):563-589.
    Evolutionary biologists seek to understand human behavior by postulating that many of our current social behaviors and emotions represent heritable adaptations that were selectively advantageous during our ancestral human environment. Studies of animal species that live in societies structured similarly to those of our ancestors may thus provide insights into the genetically influenced behavioral predispositions that may be present in ourselves. The evolutionary approach argues that family groupings have a biological basis. They form under particular ecological and demographic conditions when (...)
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  50.  75
    Pascal on Self-Caused Belief.Stephen T. Davis - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (1):27 - 37.
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