Results for 'James L. Wood'

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  1.  23
    Is There an Archê Kakou in Plato?James L. Wood - 2009 - Review of Metaphysics 63 (2):349-384.
  2.  2
    Freedom in the Philebus.James L. Wood - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:205-216.
    This paper explores a possible Platonic grounding of human freedom in the Philebus. The Philebus presents a particularly intruiging account of the humangood and freedom alike in terms of the right relation of nous and pleasure. Through a close analysis of key passages in this dialogue I show how Plato conceives of freedom in terms of the intellect’s ordering and directing of desire and pleasure to genuinely fulfilling ends. The greatest fulfillment of desire comes together with the purest pleasure in (...)
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  3.  31
    A Journey to the Dark Side of the Moon: Metaphysical and Moral Aspects of Evil in Plato’s Philebus.James L. Wood - 2009 - Faith and Philosophy 26 (2):134-153.
    This paper explores the place of evil in Plato’s thought through the lens of the Philebus. I show that the concept of evil in this dialogue is in broad agreement with the classic Christian position which accents metaphysically its privative and derivative character and morally its rebellious and self-oriented character. The entryway into the issue is 29d9–e1, where a “power of dissolution” is proposed in addition and opposition to the power of generation and mixture, and then quickly rejected. Such a (...)
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  4. Contemplating the Beautiful: The Practical Importance of Theoretical Excellence in Aristotle's Ethics.James L. Wood - 2011 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (4):391-412.
  5.  17
    Freedom in the Philebus.James L. Wood - 2007 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 81:205-216.
    This paper explores a possible Platonic grounding of human freedom in the Philebus. The Philebus presents a particularly intruiging account of the humangood and freedom alike in terms of the right relation of nous and pleasure. Through a close analysis of key passages in this dialogue I show how Plato conceives of freedom in terms of the intellect’s ordering and directing of desire and pleasure to genuinely fulfilling ends. The greatest fulfillment of desire comes together with the purest pleasure in (...)
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  6.  8
    The Guardians in Action: Plato the Teacher and the Post-Republic Dialogues From Timaeus to Theaetetus.James L. Wood - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (1):205-211.
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  7.  13
    Demographic and Endocrinological Aspects of Low Natural Fertility in Highland New Guinea.James W. Wood, Patricia L. Johnson & Kenneth L. Campbell - 1985 - Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (1):57-79.
    SummaryThe Gainj of highland Papua New Guinea do not use contraception but have a total fertility rate of only 4·3 live births per woman, one of the lowest ever recorded in a natural fertility setting. From an analysis of cross-sectional demographic and endocrinological data, the causes of low reproductive output have been identified in women of this population as: late menarche and marriage, a long interval between marriage and first birth, a high probability of widowhood at later reproductive ages, low (...)
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  8.  11
    Lactation and Birth Spacing in Highland New Guinea.James W. Wood, Daina Lai, Patricia L. Johnson, Kenneth L. Campbell & Ila A. Maslar - 1985 - Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (S9):159-173.
    SummaryThe effects of infant suckling patterns on the post-partum resumption of ovulation and on birth-spacing are investigated among the Gainj of highland New Guinea. Based on hormonal evidence, the median duration of lactational anovulation is 20·4 months, accounting for about 75% of the median interval between live birth and next successful conception. Throughout lactation, suckling episodes are short and frequent, the interval changing slowly over time, from 24 minutes in newborns to 80 minutes in 3-year olds. Maternal serum prolactin concentrations (...)
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  9.  23
    Sexual Practices and the Medieval Church. Vern L. Bullough, James Brundage.Charles T. Wood - 1986 - Speculum 61 (2):386-387.
  10.  33
    An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: I. An Account of Basic Findings.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1981 - Psychological Review 88 (5):375-407.
  11.  32
    Distributed Memory and the Representation of General and Specific Information.James L. McClelland & David E. Rumelhart - 1985 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 114 (2):159-188.
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  12.  18
    Why There Are Complementary Learning Systems in the Hippocampus and Neocortex: Insights From the Successes and Failures of Connectionist Models of Learning and Memory.James L. McClelland, Bruce L. McNaughton & Randall C. O'Reilly - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (3):419-457.
  13.  38
    A Defense of the Whole‐Brain Concept of Death.James L. Bernat - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28 (2):14-23.
  14.  60
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg & Linda B. Smith - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348-356.
  15.  4
    On the Time Relations of Mental Processes: An Examination of Systems of Processes in Cascade.James L. McClelland - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (4):287-330.
  16.  35
    Letting Structure Emerge: Connectionist and Dynamical Systems Approaches to Cognition.Linda B. Smith James L. McClelland, Matthew M. Botvinick, David C. Noelle, David C. Plaut, Timothy T. Rogers, Mark S. Seidenberg - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (8):348.
  17.  27
    Medical Decision Making by Patients in the Locked-in Syndrome.James L. Bernat - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (2):229-238.
    The locked-in syndrome is a state of profound paralysis with preserved awareness of self and environment who typically results from a brain stem stroke. Although patients in LIS have great difficulty communicating, their consciousness, cognition, and language usually remain intact. Medical decision-making by LIS patients is compromised, not by cognitive impairment, but by severe communication impairment. Former systems of communication that permitted LIS patients to make only “yes” or “no” responses to questions was sufficient to validate their consent for simple (...)
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  18. Nietzsche's Zarathustra Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-1939 by C.G. Jung ; Edited by James L. Jarrett.C. G. Jung & James L. Jarrett - 1989
     
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  19.  37
    Whither Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):3-8.
    The publicity surrounding the recent McMath and Muñoz cases has rekindled public interest in brain death: the familiar term for human death determination by showing the irreversible cessation of clinical brain functions. The concept of brain death was developed decades ago to permit withdrawal of therapy in hopeless cases and to permit organ donation. It has become widely established medical practice, and laws permit it in all U.S. jurisdictions. Brain death has a biophilosophical justification as a standard for determining human (...)
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  20.  38
    The Sufficiency of Hope: The Conceptual Foundations of Religion.James L. Muyskens - 1979 - Temple University Press.
  21.  11
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    The definition of death is one of the oldest and most enduring problems in biophilosophy and bioethics. Serious controversies over formally defining death began with the invention of the positive-pressure mechanical ventilator in the 1950s. For the first time, physicians could maintain ventilation and, hence, circulation on patients who had sustained what had been previously lethal brain damage. Prior to the development of mechanical ventilators, brain injuries severe enough to induce apnea quickly progressed to cardiac arrest from hypoxemia. Before the (...)
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  22.  38
    The Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility: A Study of Marketing Professionals.Scott J. Vitell, Joseph G. P. Paolillo & James L. Thomas - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (1):63-86.
    This study examined the effect of various antecedent variables on marketers’ perceptions of the role of ethics and socialresponsibility in the overall success of the firm. Variables examined included Hofstede’s cultural dimensions , as well as corporate ethical values and enforcement ofan ethics code. Additionally, individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism were included. Results indicated that most ofthese variables impacted marketers’ perceptions of the importance of ethics and social responsibility, although to varying degrees.
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  23.  27
    Nun Befuddles King, Shows Karmayoga Does Not Work Sulabhā's Refutation of King Janaka at MBh 12.308.James L. Fitzgerald - 2002 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (6):641-677.
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  24.  52
    Rules or Connections in Past-Tense Inflections: What Does the Evidence Rule Out?James L. McClelland & Karalyn Patterson - 2002 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (11):465-472.
  25.  24
    Timing Volition: Questions of What and When About W.James L. Ringo - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):550-551.
  26. The Place of Modeling in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):11-38.
  27.  24
    Defining Death in Theory and Practice.James L. Bernat, Charles M. Culver & Bernard Gert - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (1):5-9.
  28.  18
    On Noncongruence Between the Concept and Determination of Death.James L. Bernat - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (6):25-33.
  29.  29
    The Educational Writings of John Locke.James L. Axtell & John Locke - 1969 - British Journal of Educational Studies 17 (1):97-98.
  30.  13
    A Distributed, Developmental Model of Word Recognition and Naming.Mark S. Seidenberg & James L. McClelland - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (4):523-568.
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  31.  7
    Putting Knowledge in its Place: A Scheme for Programming Parallel Processing Structures on the Fly.James L. McClelland - 1985 - Cognitive Science 9 (1):113-146.
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  32.  93
    The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    “Brain death,” the determination of human death by showing the irreversible loss of all clinical functions of the brain, has become a worldwide practice. A biophilosophical account of brain death requires four sequential tasks: agreeing on the paradigm of death, a set of preconditions that frame the discussion; determining the definition of death by making explicit the consensual concept of death; determining the criterion of death that proves the definition has been fulfilled by being both necessary and sufficient for death; (...)
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  33.  74
    Is It Rational to Maximize?: James Wood Bailey.James Wood Bailey - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (2):195-221.
    Most versions of utilitarianism depend on the plausibility and coherence of some conceptionof maximizing well-being, but these conceptions have been attacked on various grounds. This paper considers two such contentions. First, it addresses the argument that because goods are plural and incommensurable, maximization is incoherent. It is shown that any conception of incommensurability strong enough to show the incoherence of maximization leads to an intolerable paradox. Several misunderstandings of what maximization requires are also addressed. Second, this paper responds to the (...)
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  34.  36
    Interactive Activation and Mutual Constraint Satisfaction in Perception and Cognition.James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman, Donald J. Bolger & Pranav Khaitan - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1139-1189.
    In a seminal 1977 article, Rumelhart argued that perception required the simultaneous use of multiple sources of information, allowing perceivers to optimally interpret sensory information at many levels of representation in real time as information arrives. Building on Rumelhart's arguments, we present the Interactive Activation hypothesis—the idea that the mechanism used in perception and comprehension to achieve these feats exploits an interactive activation process implemented through the bidirectional propagation of activation among simple processing units. We then examine the interactive activation (...)
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  35.  43
    Are There Interactive Processes in Speech Perception?James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman & Lori L. Holt - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):363-369.
  36. Emergence in Cognitive Science.James L. McClelland - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):751-770.
    The study of human intelligence was once dominated by symbolic approaches, but over the last 30 years an alternative approach has arisen. Symbols and processes that operate on them are often seen today as approximate characterizations of the emergent consequences of sub- or nonsymbolic processes, and a wide range of constructs in cognitive science can be understood as emergents. These include representational constructs (units, structures, rules), architectural constructs (central executive, declarative memory), and developmental processes and outcomes (stages, sensitive periods, neurocognitive (...)
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  37.  4
    Aligning the Criterion and Tests for Brain Death.James L. Bernat & Anne L. Dalle Ave - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (4):635-641.
    :Disturbing cases continue to be published of patients declared brain dead who later were found to have a few intact brain functions. We address the reasons for the mismatch between the whole-brain criterion and brain death tests, and suggest solutions. Many of the cases result from diagnostic errors in brain death determination. Others probably result from a tiny amount of residual blood flow to the brain despite intracranial circulatory arrest. Strategies to lessen the mismatch include improving brain death determination training (...)
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  38. The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2002 - Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.
    Notwithstanding these wise pronouncements, my project here is to characterize the biological phenomenon of death of the higher animal species, such as vertebrates. My claim is that the formulation of “whole- brain death ” provides the most congruent map for our correct understanding of the concept of death. This essay builds upon the foundation my colleagues and I have laid since 1981 to characterize the concept of death and refine when this event occurs. Although our society's well-accepted program of multiple (...)
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  39. The Public Involvement Manual.James L. Creighton - 1984 - Upa.
    To find more information on Rowman & Littlefield titles, please visit us at www.rowmanlittlefield.com.
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  40.  15
    Unjust Legality: A Critique of Habermas's Philosophy of Law.James L. Marsh - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book is an interpretation and critique of Habermas's philosophy as contained in his book, Between Facts and Norms. The main argument is that while Habermas does succeed in laying out foundations, conceptual and methodological, for the philosophy of law, the book is flawed by a fundamental contradiction between a democracy ruled by law and capitalism.
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  41.  8
    A Conceptual Justification for Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S19-S21.
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  42. Methodology and Ethics Research on Human Aggression.James L. Marini - 1980 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 2 (5):1.
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  43.  65
    Chronic Disorders of Consciousness.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Lancet 367 (9517):1181-1192.
  44.  27
    The Teaching of Values: Caring and Appreciation.James L. Jarrett - 1992 - British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (2):185-187.
  45.  13
    Incorporating Rapid Neocortical Learning of New Schema-Consistent Information Into Complementary Learning Systems Theory.James L. McClelland - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1190-1210.
  46.  43
    Catching the Prediction Wave in Brain Science.A. L. Roskies & C. C. Wood - 2017 - Analysis 77 (4):848-857.
    © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Analysis Trust. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: [email protected] Clark is usually among the first in philosophy to ride a new and important wave on the frontiers of cognitive science research. His Microcognition and Associative Engines chronicled connectionism, Being There explored embodied cognition, Natural Born Cyborgs deals with BCIs and environmental and technological scaffolding, and Supersizing the Mind is an extended argument for extended minds. Clark's latest, (...)
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  47. Quantum Theoretical Concepts of Measurement: Part I.James L. Park - 1968 - Philosophy of Science 35 (3):205-231.
    The overall purpose of this paper is to clarify the physical meaning and epistemological status of the term 'measurement' as used in quantum theory. After a review of the essential logical structure of quantum physics, Part I presents interpretive discussions contrasting the quantal concepts observable and ensemble with their classical ancestors along the lines of Margenau's latency theory. Against this background various popular ideas concerning the nature of quantum measurement are critically surveyed. The analysis reveals that, in addition to internal (...)
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  48.  23
    Are Organ Donors After Cardiac Death Really Dead?James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):122.
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  49.  32
    How Much of the Brain Must Die in Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 1992 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 3 (1):21.
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  50.  45
    An Interactive Activation Model of Context Effects in Letter Perception: II. The Contextual Enhancement Effect and Some Tests and Extensions of the Model.David E. Rumelhart & James L. McClelland - 1982 - Psychological Review 89 (1):60-94.
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