Results for 'Milo Phillips-Brown'

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  1.  29
    Book Review Section 1. [REVIEW]Steven I. Miller, Frank A. Stone, William K. Medlin, Clinton Collins, W. Robert Morford, Marc Belth, John T. Abrahamson, Albert W. Vogel, J. Don Reeves, Richard D. Heyman, K. Armitage, Stewart E. Fraser, Edward R. Beauchamp, Clark C. Gill, Edward J. Nemeth, Gordon C. Ruscoe, Charles H. Lyons, Douglas N. Jackson, Bemman N. Phillips, Melvin L. Silberman, Charles E. Pascal, Richard E. Ripple, Harold Cook, Morris L. Bigge, Irene Athey, Sandra Gadell, John Gadell, Daniel S. Parkinson, Nyal D. Royse & Isaac Brown - 1972 - Educational Studies 3 (1):1-28.
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  2.  34
    The Discussion About Proposals to Change the Western Culture Program at Stanford University.Donald Kennedy, John Perky, Carolyn Lougee, Marsh McCall, Paul Robinson, James Gibb, Clara N. Bush, Judith Brown, George Dekker, Bill King, William Chace, Carlos Camargo, J. Martin Evans, Ronald Rebholz, Carl Degler, Barbara Gelpi, Renato Rosaldo, William Mahrt, Halsey Rayden, Herbert Lindenberger, Albert Gelpi, Gregson Davis, Diane Middlebrook, David Kennedy, Dennis Phillips, Harry Papasotiriou, Martin Evans, Ron Rebholz, Bill Chace, Jim van HarveySneehan & David Riggs - 1989 - Minerva 27 (2-3):223-411.
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  3.  18
    Contributor Biographies.Daniel S. Brown, Heather Brown, Catherine A. Civello, Sara Dustin, Melissa Dykes, Deborah M. Fratz, Alexis Harley, Anne-Sophie Leluan-Pinker, Diana Maltz & Natalie A. Phillips - forthcoming - Aesthetics and Business Ethics.
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  4.  25
    John Godwin: Lucretius, De Rerum Natura IV . Pp. xii + 170. Warminster: Aris & Phillips, 1986. £18.75.P. Michael Brown - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (2):409-410.
  5.  22
    James Phillips, Ed. (2008) Cinematic Thinking: Philosophical Approaches to the New Cinema.William Brown - 2010 - Film-Philosophy 14 (1):337-349.
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  6.  14
    Preventive Misconception and Risk Behaviors in a Multinational HIV Prevention Trial.Jeremy Sugarman, Li Lin, Jared M. Baeten, Thesla Palanee-Phillips, Elizabeth R. Brown, Flavia Matovu Kiweewa, Nyaradzo M. Mgodi, Gonasagrie Nair, Samantha Siva, Damon M. Seils & Kevin P. Weinfurt - 2019 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 10 (2):79-87.
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  7.  17
    Indian Painting Under the Mughals A. D. 1550 to A. D. 1750The Ṫūṫī-Nāma of the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Origins of Mughal PaintingThe Grand Mogul, Imperial Painting in India 1600-1660The Tuti-Nama of the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Origins of Mughal Painting. [REVIEW]Michael W. Meister, Percy Brown, Pramod Chandra & Milo Cleveland Beach - 1981 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 101 (4):475.
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  8. Life and Collected Works of Thomas Brown.Thomas Brown & Dixon - 2003
  9.  15
    Feminism, Law, and Neoliberalism: An Interview and Discussion with Wendy Brown.Katie Cruz & Wendy Brown - 2016 - Feminist Legal Studies 24 (1):69-89.
    On the 24th June 2015, Feminist Legal Studies and the London School of Economics Law Department hosted an afternoon event with Professor Wendy Brown, Class of 1936 First Professor of Political Science, University of California. Professor Brown kindly agreed to discuss her scholarship on feminist theory, and its relationship to both the law and neoliberalism. The event included an interview by Dr Katie Cruz and a Q&A session, which are presented here in an edited version of the transcript. Sumi Madhock, (...)
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  10.  39
    Philosophy and Theology in the Long Middle Ages: A Tribute to Stephen F. Brown.Kent Emery, Russell L. Friedman, Andreas Speer, Maxime Mauriege & Stephen F. Brown (eds.) - 2011 - Brill.
    The title of this Festschrift to Stephen Brown points to the understanding of medieval philosophy and theology in the longue durée of their traditions and discourses.
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  11.  20
    Moral Mathematics: An Interview with Campbell Brown.Campbell Brown - 2016 - Lse Philosophy Blog.
    Campbell Brown is one of the most recent additions to our faculty. We thought we’d welcome him to the Department with some questions.
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  12. Better Never to Have Been Believed: Benatar on the Harm of Existence: Campbell Brown.Campbell Brown - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):45-52.
    In Better Never to Have Been, David Benatar argues that existence is always a harm. His argument, in brief, is that this follows from a theory of personal good which we ought to accept because it best explains several???asymmetries???. I shall argue here that Benatar's theory suffers from a defect which was already widely known to afflict similar theories, and that the main asymmetry he discusses is better explained in a way which allows that existence is often not a harm.
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  13.  99
    More on Self-Enslavement and Paternalism in Mill: D. G. Brown.D. G. Brown - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):144-150.
  14. James Robert Brown: Thought Experiments and Platonism. Part Two.Nancy J. Nersessian, Dunja Jutronic, Ksenija Puskaric, Nenad Miscevic, Andreas K. A. Georgiou & James Robert Brown - 2007 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (20):125-268.
     
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  15.  62
    Signifying Voices: Reading the “Adam Smith Problem”: Vivienne Brown.Vivienne Brown - 1991 - Economics and Philosophy 7 (2):187-220.
    The “Adam Smith problem” has traditionally been concerned with the issue of authorial integrity: the issue of how a single author, Adam Smith, could have written two such apparently dissimilar, even contradictory, works as The Theory of Moral Sentiments and The Wealth of Nations. As the problem to be resolved was the single authorial origin of two such works, the perceived incompatibilities between them were explained in terms of Smith's intellectual biography – for example, Smith's travels to France, Smith's meetings (...)
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  16.  85
    Stove's Reading of Mill: D. G. Brown.D. G. Brown - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (1):122-126.
  17.  29
    Preface to ‘Some Royal but Unmemoired Fellows’ by A.C. Brown.Jane Carruthers & A. C. Brown - 2014 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 69 (1):45-54.
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  18.  59
    Reading Adam Smith's Texts on Morals and Wealth: Vivienne Brown.Vivienne Brown - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (2):344-351.
    In his Comment ‘Adam Smith on the Morality of the Pursuit of Fortune’, Richard Arlen Kleer accepts much of the argument in my article ‘Signifying Voices’ but insists that I have ‘gone too far’. Kleer agrees that there is a moral hierarchy in Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments where benevolence and self-command are ranked higher than justice and prudence, but he is uneasy with the conclusion that economic activity and the pursuit of gain are ‘amoral’ activities and insists that (...)
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  19.  61
    Religion in Wittgenstein's Mirror: D. Z. Phillips.D. Z. Phillips - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:135-150.
    There is a well-known remark in Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations which even some philosophers sympathetic to his work have found very hard to accept. It reads: Philosophy may in no way interfere with the actual use of language; it can in the end only describe it. For it cannot give it any foundation either. It leaves everything as it is. Surely, it is said, that is carrying matters too far. Wittgenstein's hyperbole should be excused as a harmless stylistic flourish.
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  20.  53
    Virtue, Knowledge, and Wickedness: RONALD D. MILO.Ronald D. Milo - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (1):196-215.
    Is it possible for a person to understand that what he proposes to do is morally wrong and yet prefer to do it nonetheless? I shall argue that wickedness consists in a defect of character that results in one's often having just such preferences. Yet many philosophers think that wickedness so conceived is impossible, because, for them, having such a preference is incompatible with believing, or at least knowing, that the act would be wrong.
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  21.  17
    Is Absolute Identification Always Relative? Comment on Stewart, Brown, and Chater.Scott Brown, A. A. J. Marley & Yves Lacouture - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (2):528-532.
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  22.  52
    Dislocating the Soul: D. Z. PHILLIPS.D. Z. Phillips - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (4):447-462.
    Many analyses of belief in the soul ignore the soul in the words. Dislocations of concepts occur when words are divorced from their normal implications. The ‘soul’ is sometimes the dislocated utterer of such words. Pictures, including pictures of the soul leaving the body, may mislead us by suggesting applications which they, in fact, do not have. But pictures of the soul may enter people's lives as desires for a temporal eternity. Contrasting conceptions of immortality and eternal life depend on (...)
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  23.  50
    On Giving Practice its Due – a Reply: D. Z. PHILLIPS.D. Z. Phillips - 1995 - Religious Studies 31 (1):121-127.
  24. Book Review : The Body and Society, by Peter Brown. London, Faber & Faber, 1989. Xx + 504 Pp. 7.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]D. Brown - 1991 - Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):80-83.
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  25.  54
    Minds, Persons and the Unthinkable: D. Z. Phillips.Dayton Z. Phillips - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 53:49-65.
    In a series of lectures on minds and persons, I am going to take advantage of the occasion to ask what kind of person should one be if one has a philosophical mind. I ask the question because it is itself a philosophically contentious issue. Indeed, I shall be offering answers in a climate which is generally hostile to them. I want to aise the issue in three contexts: first, in relation to questions which have been treated epistemologically, but which (...)
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  26.  49
    Response From Young, Sprengelmeyer, Phillips and Calder.A. W. Young, R. Sprengelmeyer, M. Phillips & A. J. Calder - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (9):322-325.
  27.  58
    Science in Democracy: Expertise, Institutions, and Representation by Mark B. Brown. [REVIEW]Matthew J. Brown - 2010 - Isis 101 (3):686-687.
  28.  38
    Divine Omniscience, Immutability, Aseity and Human Free Will: ROBERT F. BROWN.Robert F. Brown - 1991 - Religious Studies 27 (3):285-295.
    If classical Western theism is correct that God's timeless omniscience is compatible with human free will, then it is incoherent to hold that this God can in any strict sense be immutable and a se as well as omniscient. That is my thesis. ‘Classical theism’ shall refer here to the tradition of philosophical theology centring on such mainstream authors as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas. ‘Divine omniscience’ shall mean that the eternal God knows all events as a timeless observer of them. (...)
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  29.  28
    Moral Deadlock: Ronald D. Milo.Ronald D. Milo - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (238):453-471.
    Very often moral disagreements can be resolved by appealing to factual considerations because in these cases the parties to the dispute agree as to which factual considerations are relevant. They agree, that is, with respect to their basic moral standards. Hence, when their disagreement about the non-moral facts is resolved, so is their moral disagreement. But sometimes moral disagreement persists in spite of agreement on factual considerations. When this happens, and when neither party is guilty of illogical thinking, we have (...)
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  30. The Philosopher and Society in Late Antiquity: Essays in Honour of Peter Brown.Peter Brown, Andrew Smith & Karin Alt (eds.) - 2005 - Distributor in the U.S., David Brown Bk. Co..
  31.  30
    Berkeley on the Unity of the Self: S. C. Brown.S. C. Brown - 1971 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 5:64-87.
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there were ‘any principles more opposite to Scepticism than those we have laid down’. Yet Hume was to write of Berkeley that ‘most of the writings of that very ingenious author form the best lessons of scepticism, Bayle not excepted’. And it has become something of a commonplace (...)
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  32.  30
    Harold I. Brown. Reviewed Work: Knowledge in a Social World by Alvin I. Goldman. [REVIEW]Harold I. Brown - 2000 - Philosophy of Science 67 (2):348-352.
  33.  49
    Response From Martin McKeown, Makeig, Brown, Jung, Kindermann, Bell and Sejnowski.S. Makeig, G. G. Brown, S. S. Kindermann, T.-P. Jung, A. J. Bell, T. J. Sejnowski & M. J. McKeown - 1998 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (10):375.
  34.  28
    The Federal Convention and the Formation of the Union of the American States. By Robert E. Brown.Robert E. Brown - 1960 - Ethics 71 (2):139-141.
  35.  45
    Personal Reflections Provoked by ASSC6 Steven Ravett Brown On Conference Styles.S. Brown - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (7):50-53.
    Generally, I find gatherings of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness more interesting and congenial than the Tucson conferences. There are at least two reasons for this, the first one obvious: the former is smaller. Less crowds, more chances to participate in discussions . The second reason reflects my predispositions, and of course those of the ASSC: the talks, research, and speculation are closely data-driven. I find it highly refreshing to attend talks on consciousness which are reporting experiments (...)
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  36.  45
    A Comprehensive Overview of Cosmopolitan Literature Garrett Wallace Brown and Megan Kime.Eric Brown, Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism, A. In & Mary Louise Gill - 2010 - In Garrett Wallace Brown & David Held (eds.), The Cosmopolitanism Reader. Polity.
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  37.  39
    Brown's Rationality.Harold Brown - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (1):45 – 55.
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  38.  29
    Allegiance and Change in Morality: A Study in Contrasts: D. Z. Phillips.D. Z. Phillips - 1972 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 6:47-64.
    It has been said that the tendency to make use of examples drawn from literature in discussing problems in moral philosophy is not only dangerous, but needless. Dangers there certainly are, but these have little to do with the reasons offered for the needlessness of such examples. Examples drawn from literature, it is said, introduce an unnecessary complexity into one's philosophising. Indeed, as Peter Winch has pointed out, according to ‘a fairly well-established … tradition in recent Anglo-Saxon moral philosophy … (...)
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  39.  35
    Psychological Egoism Revisited: Norman J. Brown.Norman J. Brown - 1979 - Philosophy 54 (209):293-309.
    Psychological egoism is, I suppose, regarded by most philosophers as one of the more simple-minded fallacies in the history of philosophy, and dangerous and seductive too, contriving as it does to combine cynicism about human ideals and a vague sense of scientific method, both of which make the ordinary reader feel sophisticated, with conceptual confusion, which he cannot resist. For all of these reasons it springs eternal, in one form or another, in the breasts of first-year students, and offers excellent (...)
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  40.  34
    Svaraj, the Indian Ideal of Freedom: A Political or Religious Concept?: C. MacKenzie Brown.C. Mackenzie Brown - 1984 - Religious Studies 20 (3):429-441.
    To many Western students of India, svarāj and mokṣa have often seemed to represent two very different ideals of freedom, the former social, political, and modern; the latter individual, spiritual, and traditional. It is not surprising that the Hindu ideal of spiritual freedom is most commonly known by the term mokṣa , for it is this word that is usually listed as the fourth and supreme goal in the famous four ends of man . The first three ends, desire , (...)
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  41.  24
    The ‘Principle’ of Natural Order: Or What the Enlightened Sceptics Did Not Doubt: S. C. Brown.Stuart Brown - 1978 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 12:56-76.
    My title advertizes a paradox. The characteristic complaint of the sceptic is that others make assumptions they are not entitled to make. A philosophical sceptic is committed to a systematic refusal to accept such assumptions in the absence of the kind of justification they think is required. A sceptic who, none the less, helps himself to such an assumption, seems to be caught in a paradoxical position. This is the kind of situation in which, it seems, certain eighteenth-century sceptical philosophers (...)
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  42.  24
    The Devil's Disguises: Philosophy of Religion, ‘Objectivity’ and ‘Cultural Divergence’: D. Z. Phillips.D. Z. Phillips - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 17:61-77.
    In approaching the topic, ‘Objectivity and Cultural Divergence’, there is little doubt that certain styles of philosophizing will conceive of the task confronting them as that of devising or at least calling attention to standards of rationality by which distinctions between objectivity and divergence are to be drawn. This mode of philosophizing is marked by the confidence it has in its own methods. It seldom occurs to it to question its own operations; to ask whether the heterogeneity of our culture (...)
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  43.  33
    Primitive Reactions and the Reactions of Primitives: The 1983 Marett Lecture: D. Z. PHILLIPS.D. Z. Phillips - 1986 - Religious Studies 22 (2):165-180.
    In his 1950 Marett Lecture, Professor Evans-Pritchard gave an account of important methodological developments which had taken place in social anthropology. I should like to use the occasion to concentrate on some of the deep contemporary divisions in another subject which interested R. R. Marett, namely, the philosophy of religion. I shall do so, however, by reference to some of the methodological issues which concerned Evans-Pritchard.
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  44.  20
    American Constitutional Custom: A Forgotten Factor in the Founding. By Stuart Gerry Brown.Stuart Gerry Brown - 1953 - Ethics 64 (3):230-231.
  45.  19
    Mill on the Harm in Not Voting: D. G. Brown.D. G. Brown - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (2):126-133.
    Christopher Miles Coope offers a letter, drafted by Helen Taylor but certified by Mill, in which Mill asserts the duty to vote, as evidence that he could not have regarded harmfulness to others as a necessary condition of moral wrongness. But it is clear that Mill regarded the duty to vote as one of imperfect obligation, and the wrongness of not fulfilling it as a matter roughly of not doing enough, in this case not doing one's fair share. He has (...)
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  46.  16
    An Interview with Nancy Carpentier Brown.Nancy Carpentier Brown & Sean P. Dailey - 2016 - The Chesterton Review 42 (1/2):201-205.
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  47.  20
    India and Indology: Selected Articles by W. Norman Brown.M. B. Emeneau, Rosane Rocher & Norman Brown - 1981 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 101 (2):236.
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  48.  27
    Evolving Theory in International Ethics International Relations in a Changing Global System: Toward a Theory of the World Polity, Second Edition, Seyom Brown , 208 Pp., $17.95 Paper, $49.95 Cloth. The Restructuring of International Relations Theory, Mark Neufeld , 188 Pp., $16.95 Paper, $54.95 Cloth. Ethics in International Relations: A Constitutive Theory, Mervyn Frost , 264 Pp., $18.95 Paper, $59.95 Cloth. [REVIEW]Chris Brown - 1997 - Ethics and International Affairs 11:293-294.
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  49.  24
    A Kind of Necessary Truth: Norman J. Brown.Norman J. Brown - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (191):37-54.
    In what sense can we not help thinking that every event has a cause? One answer is, that this begs the question: we can think of events as uncaused. Well, we can think of events in isolation from causes, and we can formulate the proposition that some events have no cause, or that no event needs a cause. But the first of these does not constitute thinking of an event as not caused , but thinking of an event not-as-caused ; (...)
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  50.  42
    Book Reviews : Philosophical Disputes in the Social Sciences. Edited by S. C. BROWN. Sussex and New Jersey: Harvester Press and Humanities Press, 1979. Pp. X + 277. 15.95. [REVIEW]R. Brown - 1984 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 14 (3):418-425.
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