Results for 'Turner, Derek Donald'

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  1.  91
    Levinas and Kierkegaard on Divine Transcendence and Ethical Life: Response to Donald L. Turner and Ford Turrell’s “The Non-Existent God”. [REVIEW]Daniel Murphy - 2007 - Philosophia 35 (3-4):383-385.
    This article is a brief commentary on Donald Turner and Ford Turrell’s “The Non-Existent God: Transcendence, Humanity, and Ethics in Emmanuel Levinas.” While I agree with Turner and Turrell’s general presentation of Levinas’s existential conception of God and ethics, I reflect primarily on the reference the authors make to Kierkegaard as an existentialist forefather of Levinas. I show certain basic similarities between Levinas and Kierkegaard as existentialist thinkers, but also note their differences, also taking into consideration the influence of (...)
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  2. Guessing the Future of the Past: Derek Turner, Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Realism Debate. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, 2007.Ben Jeffares - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (1):125-142.
    I review the book “Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate” by Derek Turner. Turner suggests that philosophers should take seriously the historical sciences such as geology when considering philosophy of science issues. To that end, he explores the scientific realism debate with the historical sciences in mind. His conclusion is a view allied to that of Arthur Fine: a view Turner calls the natural historical attitude. While I find Turner’s motivations good, I find his characterisation of (...)
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  3.  28
    NIMBY, Agent-Relative Reasons and Public Reason: An Open Peer Commentary on Simon Feldman and Derek Turner's ‘Why Not NIMBY?’.Kenneth Shockley - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):329-332.
    NIMBY claims have certainly been vilified. But, as Feldman and Turner point out, one cannot condemn all NIMBY claims without condemning all appeals to partiality. This suggests that any moral problem with NIMBY claims stems not from their status as NIMBY claims but from an underlying illegitimate appeal to partiality. I suggest that if we are to distinguish illegitimate from legitimate appeals to partiality we should look to what might morally justify the sort of agent-relative reasons that can be expressed (...)
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  4.  51
    Some Recollections of Gap Jumping. Derek H. R. BartonFrom Design to Discovery. Donald J. CramSteroids Made It Possible. Carl DjerassiFrom Cologne to Chapel Hill. Ernest L. ElielEnjoying Organic Chemistry. Egbert HavingaExplorations with Sugars: How Sweet It Was. Raymond U. LemieuxMy 132 Semesters of Chemistry Studies: Studium Chymiae Nec Nisi Cum Morte Finitur. Vladimir Prelog, Otto Theodor Benfey, David GinsburgThe Right Place at the Right Time. John D. Roberts. [REVIEW]William B. Jensen - 1992 - Isis 83 (4):685-687.
  5.  20
    Philosophy Among the Fossils: Derek Turner: Paleontology: A Philosophical Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011, 208pp, $28.99, £17.99 PB.David Sepkoski - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):363-366.
    Philosophy among the fossils Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9616-3 Authors David Sepkoski, History Department, University of North Carolina Wilmington, 601 S. College Road, Wilmington, NC 28405, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  6.  7
    Derek Turner. Paleontology: A Philosophical Introduction. Xi + 227 Pp., Illus., Tables, Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. $28. [REVIEW]Chris Haufe - 2012 - Isis 103 (3):629-630.
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  7.  19
    Review of Derek Turner, Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate[REVIEW]Stathis Psillos - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (5).
  8.  52
    Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate.Derek Turner - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Scientists often make surprising claims about things that no one can observe. In physics, chemistry, and molecular biology, scientists can at least experiment on those unobservable entities, but what about researchers in fields such as paleobiology and geology who study prehistory, where no such experimentation is possible? Do scientists discover facts about the distant past or do they, in some sense, make prehistory? In this book Derek Turner argues that this problem has surprising and important consequences for the scientific (...)
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  9. Jesus' Return as Lottery Puzzle: A Reply to Donald Smith.P. Roger Turner - 2012 - Religious Studies 48 (3):305-313.
    In his recent paper, “Lottery Puzzles and Jesus’ Return,” Donald Smith says that Christians should accept a very robust skepticism about the future because a Christian ought to think that the probability of Jesus’ return happening at any future moment is inscrutable to her. But I think that Smith’s argument lacks the power to rationally persuade Christians who are antecedently uncommitted as to whether or not we can or do have any substantive knowledge about the future. Moreover, I think (...)
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  10.  38
    Paleontology: A Philosophical Introduction.Derek Turner - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the wake of the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, paleontologists continue to investigate far-reaching questions about how evolution works. Many of those questions have a philosophical dimension. How is macroevolution related to evolutionary changes within populations? Is evolutionary history contingent? How much can we know about the causes of evolutionary trends? How do paleontologists read the patterns in the fossil record to learn about the underlying evolutionary processes? Derek Turner explores these and other questions, introducing the (...)
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  11.  18
    Form and Content: An Introduction to Formal Logic.Derek D. Turner - 2020 - Digital Commons @ Connecticut College.
    Derek Turner, Professor of Philosophy, has written an introductory logic textbook that students at Connecticut College, or anywhere, can access for free. The book differs from other standard logic textbooks in its reliance on fun, low-stakes examples involving dinosaurs, a dog and his friends, etc. This work is published in 2020 under a Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share this text in any format or medium. You may not use it for commercial purposes. If you share (...)
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  12.  46
    'Social Identity'and 'Shared Worldview': Free Riders in Explanations of Collective Action.Helen Lauer - 2013 - Abstracta 7 (1).
    The notions 'worldview' and 'social identity' are examined to consider whether they contribute substantively to causal sequences or networks or thought clusters that result in group acts executed intentionally. ... Three proposed explanaitons of sectarian conflict or ethnic violence are analysed as examples of theories that causally link intenitonal group behaivour to the worldviews and social identities of the individual agents directly involved. But as will be shown, it is not a priori features of worldivews and identities as such, but (...)
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  13.  18
    What Matters in Caring: Some Reflections on Derek Parfit’s On What Matters.Christopher Donald Cordner - 2019 - Sophia 58 (3):525-533.
    This essay is prompted by the recent publication of a volume of critical essays on Derek Parfit’s On What Matters, along with a third volume of On What Matters responding to those essays. Parfit and his interlocutors often end up either barely engaging with one another, or engaging on terms that are often questionable. As others have done, I question Parfit’s radical bifurcation of a merely ‘psychological’ sense of caring, of what it is for a thing or creature to (...)
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  14.  13
    Frank Turner on John Henry Newman and Development.Donald G. Graham - 2012 - Newman Studies Journal 9 (1):75-88.
    The late Frank M. Turner’s revisionist biography, John Henry Newman: The Challenge to Evangelical Religion has caused controversy. This essay considers one of Turner’s controversial contentions, namely, that Newman’s Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine is a naturalistic account of the history of the Christian church—an account devoid of the presence of Providence.
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  15. Donald Baxter's Composition as Identity.Jason Turner - 2014 - In Donald Baxter & Aaron Cotnoir (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press.
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  16. Derek Jarman in the Docklands : The Last of England and Thatcher's London.Mark W. Turner - 2011 - In John David Rhodes & Elena Gorfinkel (eds.), Taking Place: Location and the Moving Image. University of Minnesota Press.
     
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  17.  15
    Review of Donald R. Griffin. 2001. Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness. [REVIEW]Derek S. Jeffreys - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):70-71.
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  18.  11
    Introduction to Attic Greek by Donald J. Mastronarde. [REVIEW]J. Turner - 1996 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 89:235-235.
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  19.  9
    Chaucer in His Time. Derek Brewer.Donald W. Sutherland - 1965 - Speculum 40 (1):128-129.
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  20.  16
    Review of Donald R. Griffin. 2001. Animal Minds: Beyond Cognition to Consciousness. [REVIEW]Derek S. Jeffreys - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (4):70-71.
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  21.  5
    Methodology and Epistemology for Social Science: Selected Papers. Donald T. Campbell, E. Samuel Overman.Stephen Turner - 1989 - Isis 80 (4):739-740.
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  22.  5
    Obituary Derek John de Solla Price 1922–1983.G. L'E. Turner - 1984 - Annals of Science 41 (2):105-107.
  23. Devriese, Stephan, 439 Dietrich, Arne, 746 Doan, Tieu, 501 Dryden, Donald, 254.David DuBois, Alarik Arenander, Talis Bachmann, Carrie Ballantyne, V. Barbieri, Cristina Becchio, Ralf-Peter Behrendt, Annabelle Belcher, Cesare Bertone & Derek Besner - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13:860-861.
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  24. Martin Dodge, Mary McDerby, and Martin Turner (Eds.), Geographic Visualization: Concepts, Tools and Applications.Derek Shanahan - 2009 - Environment, Space, Place:173-175.
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  25.  78
    Local Underdetermination in Historical Science.Derek Turner - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):209-230.
  26.  61
    Introduction: Scientific Knowledge of the Deep Past.Adrian Currie & Derek Turner - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:43-46.
  27.  18
    A Second Look at the Colors of the Dinosaurs.Derek D. Turner - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:60-68.
  28.  44
    De-Extinction as Artificial Species Selection.Derek Turner - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):395-411.
    This paper offers a paleobiological perspective on the debate concerning the possible use of biotechnology to bring back extinct species. One lesson from paleobiology is that extinction selectivity matters in addition to extinction rates and extinction magnitude. Combining some of Darwin’s insights about artificial selection with the theory of species selection that paleobiologists developed in the 1970s and 1980s provides a useful context for thinking about de-extinction. Using recent work on the prioritization of candidate species for de-extinction as a test (...)
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  29.  38
    In Defense of Living Fossils.Derek Turner - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):23.
    Lately there has been a wave of criticism of the concept of living fossils. First, recent research has challenged the status of paradigmatic living fossil taxa, such as coelacanths, cycads, and tuataras. Critics have also complained that the living fossil concept is vague and/or ambiguous, and that it is responsible for misconceptions about evolution. This paper defends a particular phylogenetic conception of living fossils, or taxa that exhibit deep prehistoric morphological stability; contain few extant species; and make a high contribution (...)
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  30. Why Not NIMBY?Simon Feldman & Derek Turner - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):251-266.
    This paper examines a particularly egregious example of a NIMBY claim and considers three proposals for explaining what about that claim might be ethically problematic: The NIMBY claimant is being selfish or self-serving; The NIMBY claim cannot be morally justified, because respecting everyone's NIMBY claims leaves communities worse off; and if policymakers were to defer to people's NIMBY claims, they would end up perpetuating environmental injustices. We argue that these proposals fail to explain why there is anything wrong with the (...)
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  31.  46
    Gould’s Replay Revisited.Derek D. Turner - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):65-79.
    This paper develops a critical response to John Beatty’s recent (2006) engagement with Stephen Jay Gould’s claim that evolutionary history is contingent. Beatty identifies two senses of contingency in Gould’s work: an unpredictability sense and a causal dependence sense. He denies that Gould associates contingency with stochastic phenomena, such as drift. In reply to Beatty, this paper develops two main claims. The first is an interpretive claim: Gould really thinks of contingency has having to do with stochastic effects at the (...)
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  32.  20
    The Lack of Clarity in the Precautionary Principle.Derek Turner & Lauren Hartzell - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (4):449 - 460.
    The precautionary principle states, roughly, that it is better to take precautionary measures now than to deal with serious harms to the environment or human health later on. This paper builds on the work of Neil A. Manson in order to show that the precautionary principle, in all of its forms, is fraught with vagueness and ambiguity. We examine the version of the precautionary principle that was formulated at the Wingspread Conference sponsored by the Science and Environmental Health Network in (...)
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  33.  63
    The Topography of Historical Contingency.Rob Inkpen & Derek Turner - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):1-19.
    Abstract Starting with Ben-Menahem's definition of historical contingency as sensitivity to variations in initial conditions, we suggest that historical events and processes can be thought of as forming a complex landscape of contingency and necessity. We suggest three different ways of extending and elaborating Ben-Menahem's concepts: (1) By supplementing them with a notion of historical disturbance; (2) by pointing out that contingency and necessity are subject to scaling effects; (3) by showing how degrees of contingency/necessity can change over time. We (...)
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  34.  26
    How Much Can We Know About the Causes of Evolutionary Trends?Derek D. Turner - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):341-357.
    One of the first questions that paleontologists ask when they identify a large-scale trend in the fossil record (e.g., size increase, complexity increase) is whether it is passive or driven. In this article, I explore two questions about driven trends: (1) what is the underlying cause or source of the directional bias? and (2) has the strength of the directional bias changed over time? I identify two underdetermination problems that prevent scientists from giving complete answers to these two questions.
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  35.  12
    Historicity and Explanation.Marc Ereshefsky & Derek Turner - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 80:47-55.
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  36.  44
    Philosophical Issues in Recent Paleontology.Derek D. Turner - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (7):494-505.
    The distinction between idiographic science, which aims to reconstruct sequences of particular events, and nomothetic science, which aims to discover laws and regularities, is crucial for understanding the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s. Stephen Jay Gould at times seemed conflicted about whether to say (a) that idiographic science is fine as it is or (b) that paleontology would have more credibility if it were more nomothetic. Ironically, one of the lasting results of the paleobiological revolution was a new (...)
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  37.  21
    Biases in the Selection of Candidate Species for De-Extinction.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):21-24.
    Entrenched biases in favour of large, charismatic mammals, towards predators, towards terrestrial animals and towards species that have cultural importance can influence the selection of candidate species for de-extinction research. Often, the species with the highest existence value will also be the ones that raise the most serious animal welfare concerns.
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  38.  9
    Why Not NIMBY?Simon Feldman & Derek Turner - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):105-115.
    This paper develops responses to several critics who commented on an earlier paper that we published in this journal. In that paper, we argued that there is nothing necessarily wrong with NIMBY claims or those who make them. The critics raised some important issues, such as whether “NIMBY” is essentially a pejorative term; the possibility that NIMBY claimants are saying something deep about the noncomparability of places; what exactly it means for policy makers to defer to a NIMBY claim; the (...)
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  39.  29
    The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism.Derek D. Turner - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):1-17.
    Scientific realism is fundamentally a view about unobservable things, events, processes, and so on, but things can be unobservable either because they are tiny or because they are past. The familiar abductive arguments for scientific realism lend more justification to scientific realism about the tiny than to realism about the past. This paper examines both the “basic” abductive arguments for realism advanced by philosophers such as Ian Hacking and Michael Devitt, as well as Richard Boyd’s version of the inference to (...)
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  40. "Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application," 6th Edition, Ed. Louis P. Pojman and Paul Pojman.Derek Turner - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):448-451.
  41.  39
    Sic Transitivity.John Post & Derek Turner - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:67-82.
    In order to defend the regress argument for foundationalism against Post’s objection that relevant forms of inferential justification are not transitive, Lydia McGrew and Timothy McGrew define a relation E of positive evidence, which, they contend, has the following features: It is a necessary condition for any inferential justification; it is transitive and irreflexive; and it enables both a strengthened regress argument proof against Post’s objection and an argument that nothing can ever appear in its own justificational ancestry. In reply, (...)
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  42.  12
    Speculation in the Historical Sciences.Derek Turner - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    In Rock, Bone, and Ruin, Adrian Currie offers an account of how historically oriented researchers in paleontology, archaeology, and the geosciences make the most out of their epistemically unlucky circumstances. He argues that there are three things, in particular, that can help scientists gain traction in unlucky circumstances: methodological omnivory, epistemic scaffolding, and “empirically grounded speculation”. Together, these three aspects of the practice of historical science help explain its successes. I largely agree with Currie’s account of methodological omnivory and epistemic (...)
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  43.  22
    Misleading Observable Analogues in Paleontology.Derek Turner - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):175-183.
    Carman argues, in ‘The electrons of the dinosaurs and the center of the Earth’, that we may have more reason to be realists about dinosaurs than about electrons, because there are plenty of observable analogues for dinosaurs but not for electrons. These observable analogues severely restrict the range of plausible ontologies, thus reducing the threat of underdetermination. In response to this argument, I show that the observable analogues for ancient organisms are a mixed epistemic blessing at best, and I discuss (...)
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  44.  42
    Comments on P. Kyle Stanford’s “Getting Real” The Hypothesis of Organic Fossil Origins”.Derek Turner - 2010 - Modern Schoolman 87 (3/4):245-250.
  45.  69
    An Evolutionary Account of Chronic Pain: Integrating the Natural Method in Evolutionary Psychology.Kenneth Sufka & Derek Turner - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):243-257.
    This paper offers an evolutionary account of chronic pain. Chronic pain is a maladaptive by-product of pain mechanisms and neural plasticity, both of which are highly adaptive. This account shows how evolutionary psychology can be integrated with Flanagan's natural method, and in a way that avoids the usual charges of panglossian adaptationism and an uncritical commitment to a modular picture of the mind. Evolutionary psychology is most promising when it adopts a bottom-up research strategy that focuses on basic affective and (...)
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  46.  8
    The Functions of Fossils: Inference and Explanation in Functional Morphology.Derek Turner - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (1):193-212.
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  47.  37
    Defending Science — Within Reason: Between Scientism and Cynicism, by Susan Haack. [REVIEW]Derek Turner - 2004 - Disputatio 1 (17):84-90.
  48.  11
    Are We at War with Nature?Derek D. Turner - 2005 - Environmental Values 14 (1):21 - 36.
    A number of people, from William James to Dave Foreman and Vandana Shiva, have suggested that humans are at war with nature. Moreover, the analogy with warfare figures in at least one important argument for strategic monkeywrenching. In general, an analogy can be used for purposes of (1) justification; (2) persuasion; or (3) as a tool for generating novel hypotheses and recommendations. This paper argues that the analogy with warfare should not be used for justificatory or rhetorical purposes, but that (...)
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  49.  16
    Sic Transitivity: Reply to McGrew and McGrew.John Post & Derek Turner - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:67-82.
    In order to defend the regress argument for foundationalism against Post’s objection that relevant forms of inferential justification are not transitive, Lydia McGrew and Timothy McGrew define a relation E of positive evidence, which, they contend, has the following features: It is a necessary condition for any inferential justification; it is transitive and irreflexive; and it enables both a strengthened regress argument proof against Post’s objection and an argument that nothing can ever appear in its own justificational ancestry. In reply, (...)
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  50.  35
    The Progress of Darwinism.Derek Turner - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):277-285.
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