Results for 'Jay L. Garfield'

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  1. Acquiring the Notion of a Dependent Designation: A Response to Douglas L. Berger.Jay L. Garfield & Jan Westerhoff - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (2):365-367.
    In a recent issue of Philosophy East and West Douglas Berger defends a new reading of Mūlamadhyamakakārikā XXIV : 18, arguing that most contemporary translators mistranslate the important term prajñaptir upādāya, misreading it as a compound indicating "dependent designation" or something of the sort, instead of taking it simply to mean "this notion, once acquired." He attributes this alleged error, pervasive in modern scholarship, to Candrakīrti, who, Berger correctly notes, argues for the interpretation he rejects.Berger's analysis, and the reading of (...)
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  2. The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nāgārjuna's Mūlamadhyamakakārikā.Jay Garfield - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    For nearly two thousand years Buddhism has mystified and captivated both lay people and scholars alike. Seen alternately as a path to spiritual enlightenment, an system of ethical and moral rubrics, a cultural tradition, or simply a graceful philosophy of life, Buddhism has produced impassioned followers the world over. The Buddhist saint Nagarjuna, who lived in South India in approximately the first century CE, is undoubtedly the most important, influential, and widely studied Mahayana Buddhist philosopher. His many works include texts (...)
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  3. Empty Words: Buddhist Philosophy and Cross-Cultural Interpretation.Jay L. Garfield - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects Jay Garfield 's essays on Madhyamaka, Yogacara, Buddhist ethics and cross-cultural hermeneutics. The first part addresses Madhyamaka, supplementing Garfield 's translation of Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way, a foundational philosophical text by the Buddhist saint Nagarjuna. Garfield then considers the work of philosophical rivals, and sheds important light on the relation of Nagarjuna's views to other Buddhist and non-Buddhist philosophical positions.
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  4. How We Think Mādhyamikas Think: A Response To Tom Tillemans.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):426-435.
    In his article in this issue, " 'How do Mādhyamikas Think?' Revisited," Tom Tillemans reflects on his earlier article "How do Mādhyamikas Think?" (2009), itself a response to earlier work of ours (Deguchi et al. 2008; Garfield and Priest 2003). There is much we agree with in these non-dogmatic and open-minded essays. Still, we have some disagreements. We begin with a response to Tillemans' first thoughts, and then turn to his second thoughts.Tillemans (2009) maintains that it is wrong to (...)
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  5. Hey, Buddha! Don't Think! Just Act! Reply to Finnigan.Jay L. Garfield - unknown
    Finnigan, in the course of a careful and astute discussion of the difficulties facing a Buddhist account of the moral agency of a buddha, develops a challenging critique of a proposal I made in Garfield. Much of what she says is dead on target, and I have learned much from her paper. But I have serious reservations about the central thrust both of her critique of my own thought and about her proposal for a positive account of a buddha’s (...)
     
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  6.  35
    Hey, Buddha! Don't Think! Just Act!—A Response to Bronwyn Finnigan.Jay L. Garfield - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):174-183.
    In the course of a careful and astute discussion of the difficulties facing a Buddhist account of the moral agency of a buddha, Bronwyn Finnigan develops a challenging critique of a proposal I made in a recent article (Garfield 2006). Much of what she says is dead on target, and I have learned much from her comment. But I have serious reservations about both the central thrust of her critique of my own thought and her proposal for a positive (...)
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  7. Belief in psychology. A study in the ontology of mind.Jay L. Garfield - 1991 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 181 (3):346-347.
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  8.  48
    Belief in Psychology: A Study in the Ontology of Mind.Jay L. Garfield - 1988 - MIT Press.
  9. Problems With the Argument From Fine Tuning.Mark Colyvan, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2005 - Synthese 145 (3):325-338.
    The argument from fine tuning is supposed to establish the existence of God from the fact that the evolution of carbon-based life requires the laws of physics and the boundary conditions of the universe to be more or less as they are. We demonstrate that this argument fails. In particular, we focus on problems associated with the role probabilities play in the argument. We show that, even granting the fine tuning of the universe, it does not follow that the universe (...)
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  10. Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding.Jay L. Garfield (ed.) - 1987 - MIT Press.
  11.  27
    The Self: Naturalism, Consciousness and the First-Person Stance, by Jonardon Ganeri: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Xii + 374, £40. [REVIEW]Jay L. Garfield - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):186-190.
  12.  89
    Social Cognition, Language Acquisition and the Development of the Theory of Mind.Jay L. Garfield, Candida C. Peterson & Tricia Perry - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (5):494–541.
  13.  13
    Engaging Buddhism: Why It Matters to Philosophy.Jay L. Garfield - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This is a book for scholars of Western philosophy who wish to engage with Buddhist philosophy, or who simply want to extend their philosophical horizons. It is also a book for scholars of Buddhist studies who want to see how Buddhist theory articulates with contemporary philosophy. Engaging Buddhism: Why it Matters to Philosophy articulates the basic metaphysical framework common to Buddhist traditions. It then explores questions in metaphysics, the philosophy of mind, phenomenology, epistemology, the philosophy of language and ethics as (...)
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  14. The Conventional Status of Reflexive Awareness: What's at Stake in a Tibetan Debate?Jay L. Garfield - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (2):201-228.
    ‘Ju Mipham Rinpoche, (1846-1912) an important figure in the _Ris med_, or non- sectarian movement influential in Tibet in the late 19<sup>th</sup> and early 20<sup>th</sup> Centuries, was an unusual scholar in that he was a prominent _Nying ma_ scholar and _rDzog_ _chen_ practitioner with a solid dGe lugs education. He took dGe lugs scholars like Tsong khapa and his followers seriously, appreciated their arguments and positions, but also sometimes took issue with them directly. In his commentary to Candrak¥rti’s _Madhyamakåvatåra, _Mi (...)
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  15. Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy.Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
     
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  16. Nagarjuna and the Limits of Thought.Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (1):1-21.
    : Nagarjuna seems willing to embrace contradictions while at the same time making use of classic reductio arguments. He asserts that he rejects all philosophical views including his own-that he asserts nothing-and appears to mean it. It is argued here that he, like many philosophers in the West and, indeed, like many of his Buddhist colleagues, discovers and explores true contradictions arising at the limits of thought. For those who share a dialetheist's comfort with the possibility of true contradictions commanding (...)
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  17. The Contradictions Are True—And It's Not Out of This World! A Response to Takashi Yagisawa.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):370-372.
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  18.  77
    Turning a Madhyamaka Trick: Reply to Huntington. [REVIEW]Jay L. Garfield - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (4):507-527.
    Huntington ; argues that recent commentators err in attributing to Nāgārjuna and Candrakīrti a commitment to rationality and to the use of argument, and that these commentators do violence to the Madhyamaka project by using rational reconstruction in their interpretation of Nāgārjuna’s and Candrakīrti’s texts. Huntington argues instead that mādhyamikas reject reasoning, distrust logic and do not offer arguments. He also argues that interpreters ought to recuse themselves from argument in order to be faithful to these texts. I demonstrate that (...)
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  19. Dependent Arising and the Emptiness of Emptiness: Why Did Nāgārjuna Start with Causation?Jay L. Garfield - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (2):219-250.
  20. Educating for Virtuoso Living: Papers From the Ninth East-West Philosophers' Conference.Jay L. Garfield - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):285-289.
  21. Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika (Fundamental Verses of the Middle Way): Chapter 24: Examination of the Four Noble Truths.Jay L. Garfield - 2009 - In Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.), Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oup Usa. pp. 26--34.
     
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  22. Mental Content.Jay L. Garfield & Colin McGinn - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):691.
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  23.  38
    Defending the Semantic Interpretation: A Reply to Ferraro.Mark Siderits & Jay L. Garfield - 2013 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (6):655-664.
    In a recent article in this journal, Giuseppe Ferraro mounted a sustained attack on the semantic interpretation of the Madhyamaka doctrine of emptiness, an interpretation that has been championed by the authors. The present paper is their reply to that attack.
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  24.  13
    Reflections on Reflectivity: Comments on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being.Jay L. Garfield - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):943-951.
    Evan Thompson has written a marvelous book. Waking, Dreaming, Being blends intellectual autobiography, phenomenology, cognitive science, studies in Buddhist and Vedānta philosophy, and creative metaphilosophy in an exploration of what it is to be a person, of the nature of consciousness, and of the relation of contemplative to scientific method in the understanding of human life. I have learned a great deal from it, and the community of philosophers and cognitive scientists will be reading and discussing it for some time. (...)
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  25. Madhyamaka and Classical Greek Skepticism.Georges Dreyfus & Jay L. Garfield - 2011 - In Georges Dreyfus, Bronwyn Finnigan, Jay Garfield, Guy Newland, Graham Priest, Mark Siderits, Koji Tanaka, Sonam Thakchoe, Tom Tillemans & Jan Westerhoff (eds.), Moonshadows. Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 115--130.
     
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  26.  13
    Studies in Buddhist Philosophy, by Mark Siderits.Jay L. Garfield - 2019 - Mind 128 (509):271-282.
    Studies in Buddhist Philosophy, by SideritsMark, ed. Jan Westerhoff. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. vii + 313.
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  27. Comment and Discussion.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (3):395-402.
     
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  28. Mindfulness and Ethics: Attention, Virtue and Perfection.Jay L. Garfield - unknown
    Mindfulness is regarded by all scholars and practitioners of all Buddhist traditions as essential not only for the development of insight, but also for the cultivation and maintenance of ethical discipline. The English term denotes the joint operation of what are regarded in Buddhist philosophy of mind as two cognitive functions: sati/smṛti/dran pa, which we might translate as attention in this context (although the semantic range of these terms also encompasses memory or recollection) and sampajañña/samprajanya /shes bzhin , which I (...)
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  29.  97
    The Myth of Jones and the Mirror of Nature: Reflections on Introspection.Jay L. Garfield - 1989 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (September):1-26.
  30.  87
    Epoche and Śūnyatā: Skepticism East and West.Jay L. Garfield - 1990 - Philosophy East and West 40 (3):285-307.
  31.  94
    Nagarjuna's Theory of Causality: Implications Sacred and Profane.Jay L. Garfield - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (4):507-524.
    Nāgārjuna argues for the fundamental importance of causality, and dependence more generally, to our understanding of reality and of human life: his account of these matters is generally correct. First, his account of interdependence shows how we can clearly understand the nature of scientific explanation, the relationship between distinct levels of theoretical analysis in the sciences (with particular attention to cognitive science), and how we can sidestep difficulties in understanding the relations between apparently competing ontologies induced by levels of description (...)
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  32.  83
    Taking Conventional Truth Seriously: Authority Regarding Deceptive Reality.Jay L. Garfield - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (3):341-354.
    Mädhyamika philosophers in India and Tibet distinguish between two truths: the conventional and the ultimate. It is difficult, however, to say in what sense conventional truth is indeed a truth, as opposed to falsehood. Indeed, many passages in prominent texts suggest that it is entirely false. It is explained here in the sense in which, for Candrakïrti and Tsong khapa, conventional truth is truth.
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  33. Vasubandhu's Treatise on the Three Natures Translated From the Tibetan Edition with a Commentary.Jay L. Garfield - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (2):133 – 154.
    Trisvabh vanirdeśa (Treatise on the Three Natures) is Vasubandhu's most mature and explicit exposition of the Yogc c ra doctrine of the three natures and their relation to the Buddhist idealism Vasubandhu articulates. Nonetheless there are no extent commentaries on this important short test. The present work provides an introduction to the text, its context and principal philosophical theses; a new translation of the text itself; and a close, verse-by-verse commentary on the text explaining the structure of Yogacara/Cittamatra idealism and (...)
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  34.  2
    A Border Dispute. The Place of Logic in Psychology.Jay L. Garfield & John Macnamara - 1988 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):314.
  35.  67
    The Meanings of "Meaning" and "Meaning": Dimensions of the Sciences of Mind.Jay L. Garfield - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (4):421-440.
    The naturalization of intentionality requires explaining the supervenience of the normative upon the descriptive. Proper function theory provides an account of the semantics of natural representations, but not of that of signs that require the observance of norms. I therefore distinguish two senses of "meaning" and two correlative senses of "representation" and explain their relationship to one another. I distinguish between indicative signs and semiotic devices. The former are indicators of the presence of some phenomenon. The latter are rule-governed devices (...)
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  36.  27
    Does a Table Have Buddha-Nature?: A Moment of Yes and No. Answer! But Not in Words or Signs! A Response to Mark Siderits.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):387-398.
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  37.  18
    Indian Philosophy in English: From Renaissance to Independence.Nalini Bhushan & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) - 2011 - Oup Usa.
    This book publishes, for the first time in decades, and in many cases, for the first time in a readily accessible edition, English language philosophical literature written in India during the period of British rule.
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  38.  68
    Ego, Egoism and the Impact of Religion on Ethical Experience: What a Paradoxical Consequence of Buddhist Culture Tells Us About Moral Psychology.Jay L. Garfield, Shaun Nichols, Arun K. Rai & Nina Strohminger - 2015 - The Journal of Ethics 19 (3-4):293-304.
    We discuss the structure of Buddhist theory, showing that it is a kind of moral phenomenology directed to the elimination of egoism through the elimination of a sense of self. We then ask whether being raised in a Buddhist culture in which the values of selflessness and the sense of non-self are so deeply embedded transforms one’s sense of who one is, one’s ethical attitudes and one’s attitude towards death, and in particular whether those transformations are consistent with the predictions (...)
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  39.  4
    Lala Lajpat Rai’s Classification of Nationalism: Can It Help Us to Understand Contemporary Nationalist Movements?Nalini Bhushan & Jay L. Garfield - 2018 - Sophia 57 (3):363-374.
    India has been independent for 70 years now, and it is a good time to reflect on the political philosophy that underwrote the movement that gained that independence. When we do so, we discover the origins of a political vocabulary that is still in use today, although sadly not used with the same rigor and precision with which it was used then. We also find that those who recur to Indian political thought from the pre-independence period tend to return to (...)
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  40.  58
    Just What Is Cognitive Science Anyway?Jay L. Garfield - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):1075 - 1082.
  41.  35
    Foundations of Cognitive Science: The Essential Readings.Jay L. Garfield - 1990 - New York: Paragon House.
  42. The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika, Translation and Commentary.Jay L. Garfield & D. Arnold - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49:88-91.
     
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  43.  1
    Three Natures and Three Naturelessnesses.Jay L. Garfield - 1997 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 2:1-28.
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  44.  47
    Just Another Word for Nothing Left to Lose.Jay L. Garfield - 2014 - In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 164.
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  45. Sellarsian Synopsis: Integrating the Images.Jay L. Garfield - 2012 - Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.
    Most discussion of Sellars’ deployment of the distinct images of “man-in-the-world” in "Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man" focus entirely on the manifest and the scientific images. But the original image is important as well. In this essay I explore the importance of the original image to the Sellarsian project of naturalizing epistemology, connecting Sellars’ insights regarding this image to recent work in cognitive development.
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  46.  43
    Mentalese Not Spoken Here: Computation, Cognition, and Causation.Jay L. Garfield - 1997 - Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):413-35.
    Classical computational modellers of mind urge that the mind is something like a von Neumann computer operating over a system of symbols constituting a language of thought. Such an architecture, they argue, presents us with the best explanation of the compositionality, systematicity and productivity of thought. The language of thought hypothesis is supported by additional independent arguments made popular by Jerry Fodor. Paul Smolensky has developed a connectionist architecture he claims adequately explains compositionality, systematicity and productivity without positing any language (...)
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  47.  47
    Western Idealism Through Indian Eyes: A Cittamātra Reading of Berkeley, Kant and Schopenhauer. [REVIEW]Jay L. Garfield - 1998 - Sophia 37 (1):10-41.
  48. Can Indian Philosophy Be Written in English? A Conversation with Daya Krishna.Nalini Bhushan & Jay L. Garfield - unknown
    The period of British colonial rule in India is typically regarded as philosophically sterile. Indian philosophy written in English during the British colonial period is often ignored in histories of Indian philosophy, or, when considered explicitly, dismissed either as uncreative or as inauthentic. The late Daya Krishna thought hard about this at the end of his life, and we have been thinking about this in conversation with him. We show that this dismissal is unjustified and that this is a fertile (...)
     
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  49.  8
    Emptiness and Positionlessness.Jay L. Garfield - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy and Religion 1:1-34.
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  50.  45
    A Mountain by Any Other Name: A Response to Koji Tanaka.Yasuo Deguchi, Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (3):335-343.
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