Results for 'Graham Carey'

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  1. Pattern.Graham Carey - 1938 - Newport, R.I., J. Stevens.
    Purpose and pattern; form follows function.--Pattern and appearance; figure follows form.
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  2. Thoughts & Things.Graham Carey - 1937 - Newport, R.I., J. Stevens.
     
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  3. Proposal for a New College.Peter Abbs & Graham Carey - 1977
  4.  19
    Representation Development, Perceptual Learning, and Concept Formation.I. P. L. McLaren, Andy J. Wills & S. Graham - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):141-142.
    We argue for an example of based on Diamond and Carey's (1986) work on expertise and recognition, which is not made use of in The Origin of Concepts. This mechanism for perceptual learning seems to have all the necessary characteristics in that it is innate, domain-specific (requires stimulus sets possessing a certain structure), and demonstrably affects categorisation in a way that strongly suggests it will influence concept formation as well.
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  5. The Origin of Concepts.Susan Carey - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Only human beings have a rich conceptual repertoire with concepts like tort, entropy, Abelian group, mannerism, icon and deconstruction. How have humans constructed these concepts? And once they have been constructed by adults, how do children acquire them? While primarily focusing on the second question, in The Origin of Concepts , Susan Carey shows that the answers to both overlap substantially. Carey begins by characterizing the innate starting point for conceptual development, namely systems of core cognition. Representations of (...)
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  6.  17
    “Letter to the Editor” Author Response To: Mepsted R, Tyson S. The Bobath Concept. A Guru-Led Set of Teachings Unsupported by Emerging Evidence. A Response to Vaughan-Graham and Cott. (J Eval Clin Pract. 2016. Doi: 10.1111/Jep.12751). J Eval Clin Pract. 2. [REVIEW]Julie Vaughan-Graham & Cheryl Cott - 2017 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 23 (5):1129-1131.
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  7.  79
    Conceptual Differences Between Children and Adults.Susan Carey - 1988 - Mind and Language 3 (3):167-181.
  8. Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones.Tim Morton - 2011 - Continent 1 (3):149-155.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  9. Haidt & Graham --.Jonathan Haidt & Jesse Graham - unknown
    Most academic efforts to understand morality and ideology come from theorists who limit the domain of morality to issues related to harm and fairness. For such theorists, conservative beliefs are puzzles requiring non-moral explanations. In contrast, we present moral foundations theory, which broadens the moral domain to match the anthropological literature on morality. We extend the theory by integrating it with a review of the sociological constructs of community, authority, and sacredness, as formulated by Emile Durkheim and others. We present (...)
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  10.  15
    Kant's Transcendental Idealism: Graham Bird.Graham Bird - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:71-92.
    The whole of our human experience is determined by certain material conditions which cannot themselves be a part of that experience. In particular there exist objects, inaccessible to our senses, which nevertheless interact with ourselves to produce that experience. But the selves which are so affected by these objects outside our experience, and the internal mechanisms which somehow construct that experience, are also just such material conditions of, and not parts of, that experience. We might describe this appeal to material (...)
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  11.  13
    De objectgerichte filosofie van Graham Harman: Interview.Graham Harman, Noortje Marres & Ruth Sonderegger - 2007 - Krisis 4 (4):65-79.
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  12.  58
    Infants' Knowledge of Objects: Beyond Object Files and Object Tracking.Susan Carey & Fei Xu - 2001 - Cognition 80 (1-2):179-213.
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  13. Précis of the Origin of Concepts.Susan Carey - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):113-124.
    A theory of conceptual development must specify the innate representational primitives, must characterize the ways in which the initial state differs from the adult state, and must characterize the processes through which one is transformed into the other. The Origin of Concepts (henceforth TOOC) defends three theses. With respect to the initial state, the innate stock of primitives is not limited to sensory, perceptual, or sensorimotor representations; rather, there are also innate conceptual representations. With respect to developmental change, conceptual development (...)
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  14. Science and Core Knowledge.Susan Carey & Elizabeth Spelke - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):515 - 533.
    While endorsing Gopnik's proposal that studies of the emergence and modification of scientific theories and studies of cognitive development in children are mutually illuminating, we offer a different picture of the beginning points of cognitive development from Gopnik's picture of "theories all the way down." Human infants are endowed with several distinct core systems of knowledge which are theory-like in some, but not all, important ways. The existence of these core systems of knowledge has implications for the joint research program (...)
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  15.  77
    Associative Processes in Intuitive Judgment.Carey K. Morewedge & Daniel Kahneman - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):435-440.
  16.  58
    Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond.Daniel Carey - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are human beings linked by a common nature, one that makes them see the world in the same moral way? Or are they fragmented by different cultural practices and values? These fundamental questions of our existence were debated in the Enlightenment by Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson. Daniel Carey provides an important new historical perspective on their discussion. At the same time, he explores the relationship between these founding arguments and contemporary disputes over cultural diversity and multiculturalism. Our own conflicting (...)
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  17. Overdetermination And The Exclusion Problem.Brandon Carey - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):251-262.
    The exclusion problem is held to show that mental and physical events are identical by claiming that the denial of this identity is incompatible with the causal completeness of physics and the occurrence of mental causation. The problem relies for its motivation on the claim that overdetermination of physical effects by mental and physical causes is objectionable for a variety of reasons. In this paper, I consider four different definitions of? overdetermination? and argue that, on each, overdetermination in all cases (...)
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  18. Where Our Number Concepts Come From.Susan Carey - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (4):220-254.
  19.  61
    Cognitive Foundations of Arithmetic: Evolution and Ontogenisis.Susan Carey - 2001 - Mind and Language 16 (1):37-55.
    Dehaene articulates a naturalistic approach to the cognitive foundations of mathematics. Further, he argues that the ‘number line’ system of representation is the evolutionary and ontogenetic foundation of numerical concepts. Here I endorse Dehaene’s naturalistic stance and also his characterization of analog magnitude number representations. Although analog magnitude representations are part of the evolutionary foundations of numerical concepts, I argue that they are unlikely to be part of the ontogenetic foundations of the capacity to represent natural number. Rather, the developmental (...)
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  20. The Nature of Morality: An Introduction to Ethics.Toni Vogel Carey - 1979 - Journal of Philosophy 76 (2):88-91.
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  21.  41
    On Learning New Primitives in the Language of Thought: Reply to Rey.Susan Carey - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (2):133-166.
    A theory of conceptual development must provide an account of the innate representational repertoire, must characterize how these initial representations differ from the adult state, and must provide an account of the processes that transform the initial into mature representations. In Carey, 2009 (The Origin of Concepts), I defend three theses: 1) the initial state includes rich conceptual representations, 2) nonetheless, there are radical discontinuities between early and later developing conceptual systems, 3) Quinean bootstrapping is one learning mechanism that (...)
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  22.  23
    Morality, Individuals and Collectives: Keith Graham.Keith Graham - 1987 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 22:1-18.
    My discussion in this paper is divided into three parts. In section I, I discuss some fairly familiar lines of approach to the question how moral considerations may be shown to have rational appeal. In section II, I suggest how our existence as constituents in collective entities might also influence our practical thinking. In section III, I entertain the idea that identification with collectives might displace moral thinking to some degree, and I offer Marx's class theory as a sample of (...)
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  23.  42
    Explanations of the Endowment Effect: An Integrative Review.Carey K. Morewedge & Colleen E. Giblin - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (6):339-348.
  24.  52
    Public Reason—Honesty, Not Sincerity.Brian Carey - 2018 - Journal of Political Philosophy 26 (1):47-64.
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  25. The Object Strikes Back: An Interview with Graham Harman.Lucy Kimbell & Graham Harman - 2013 - Design and Culture 5 (1):103-117.
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  26.  59
    Kantian Themes in Contemporary Philosophy: Graham Bird.Graham Bird - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):131–152.
    [Michael Friedman] This paper considers the extent to which Kant's vision of a distinctively 'transcendental' task for philosophy is essentially tied to his views on the foundations of the mathematical and physical sciences. Contemporary philosophers with broadly Kantian sympathies have attempted to reinterpret his project so as to isolate a more general philosophical core not so closely tied to the details of now outmoded mathematical-physical theories (Euclidean geometry and Newtonian physics). I consider two such attempts, those of Strawson and McDowell, (...)
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  27.  27
    Can Carey Answer Quine?Christopher S. Hill - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):132-133.
    In order to defend her claim that the concept object is biologically determined, Carey must answer Quine's gavagai argument, which purports to show that mastery of any concept with determinate reference presupposes a substantial repertoire of logical concepts. I maintain that the gavagai argument withstands the experimental data that Carey provides, but that it yields to an a priori argument.
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  28. Possible Disagreements and Defeat.Brandon Carey - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 155 (3):371-381.
    Conciliatory views about disagreement with one’s epistemic peers lead to a somewhat troubling skeptical conclusion: that often, when we know others disagree, we ought to be (perhaps much) less sure of our beliefs than we typically are. One might attempt to extend this skeptical conclusion by arguing that disagreement with merely possible epistemic agents should be epistemically significant to the same degree as disagreement with actual agents, and that, since for any belief we have, it is possible that someone should (...)
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  29.  47
    Knowledge Acquisition: Enrichment or Conceptual Change.Susan Carey - 1999 - In Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.), Concepts: Core Readings. MIT Press. pp. 459--487.
  30.  15
    On Differentiation: A Case Study of the Development of the Concepts of Size, Weight, and Density.Carol Smith, Susan Carey & Marianne Wiser - 1985 - Cognition 21 (3):177-237.
  31.  15
    Medical Assistance in Dying at a Paediatric Hospital.Carey DeMichelis, Randi Zlotnik Shaul & Adam Rapoport - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (1):60-67.
    This article explores the ethical challenges of providing Medical Assistance in Dying in a paediatric setting. More specifically, we focus on the theoretical questions that came to light when we were asked to develop a policy for responding to MAID requests at our tertiary paediatric institution. We illuminate a central point of conceptual confusion about the nature of MAID that emerges at the level of practice, and explore the various entailments for clinicians and patients that would flow from different understandings. (...)
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  32.  3
    Metalogue: How to Understand Bateson? In Memoriam Graham Barnes.Graham Barnes & Miran Možina - 2020 - Constructivist Foundations 16 (1):101-107.
    Context: For Graham Barnes, the starting point of his research was the observation that most psychotherapists are trained in a theory-centered style of practice, neglecting epistemological and ….
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  33.  27
    The Educated Woman in America. Selected Writings of Catherine Beecher, Margaret Fuller and M. Carey Thomas.Margaret Fuller, M. Carey Thomas, Barbara M. Cross & Catherine Beecher - 1966 - British Journal of Educational Studies 14 (3):103-104.
  34.  18
    Law, Morality, and the Relations of States. Terry Nardin.Carey B. Joynt - 1985 - Ethics 95 (3):761-763.
  35.  39
    What Good Are the Arts?John Carey - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Does strolling through an art museum, admiring the old masters, improve us morally and spiritually? Would government subsidies of "high art" (such as big-city opera houses) be better spent on local community art projects? In What Good are the Arts? John Carey--one of Britain's most respected literary critics--offers a delightfully skeptical look at the nature of art. In particular, he cuts through the cant surrounding the fine arts, debunking claims that the arts make us better people or that judgements (...)
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  36.  31
    Coping with the Many-Coloured Dome: Pluralism and Practical Reason: Keith Graham.Keith Graham - 1996 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 40:135-146.
    The One remains, the many change and pass; Heaven's light forever shines, Earth's shadows fly; Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass, Stains the white radiance of Eternity, Until Death tramples it to fragments. At its widest, ‘pluralism’ signifies simply the variety of life, the teeming multitude of forms and entities, the many different properties that living beings manifest. Life is not everywhere the same but impressively differentiated, and without it eternity would be all of a piece, uniform. That is (...)
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  37.  34
    Do Action Systems Resist Visual Illusions?David P. Carey - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (3):109-113.
  38.  47
    Innate and Learned: Carey, Mad Dog Nativism, and the Poverty of Stimuli and Analogies (Yet Again).Georges Rey - 2014 - Mind and Language 29 (2):109-132.
    In her recent (2009) book, The Origins of Concepts, Susan Carey argues that what she calls ‘Quinean Bootstrapping’ and processes of analogy in children show that the expressive power of a mind can be increased in ways that refute Jerry Fodor's (1975, 2008) ‘Mad Dog’ view that all concepts are innate. I argue that it is doubtful any evidence about the manifestation of concepts in children will bear upon the logico-semantic issues of expressive power. Analogy and bootstrapping may be (...)
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  39.  3
    II–Graham Bird.Graham Bird - 1998 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 72 (1):131-151.
  40. Graham's Categories.A. A. Graham - 1916
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  41.  14
    Gordon Graham Response to Remy Debes, Ryan Hanley and James Harris.Gordon Graham - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (1):18-22.
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  42. Graham Houston, Virtual Morality. [REVIEW]Gordon Graham - 1998 - Ends and Means 3 (1).
  43. John Graham's System and Dialectics of Art.John Graham & Marcia Allentuck - 1971
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  44.  20
    Graham, G. (1996). Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity by Harman Gilbert and Thomson Judith Jarvis Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1996,. [REVIEW]Gordon Graham - 1996 - Philosophy 71 (278):622-624.
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  45.  63
    Graham Greene on the Moral Significance of Violence.Graham Greene - 2009 - The Chesterton Review 35 (1/2):279-282.
  46.  29
    Graham Greene on Interrogation Methods in Ulster.Graham Greene & Christopher Hawtree - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):230-232.
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  47.  36
    Graham Greene on the IRA.Graham Greene - 2003 - The Chesterton Review 29 (1/2):232-233.
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  48.  28
    Graham Greene on Chesterton.Graham Greene - 2007 - The Chesterton Review 33 (3/4):724-727.
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  49.  32
    Graham P. McDonough.Graham P. McDonough - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  50.  12
    Do Analog Number Representations Underlie the Meanings of Young Children’s Verbal Numerals?Susan Carey, Anna Shusterman, Paul Haward & Rebecca Distefano - 2017 - Cognition 168:243-255.
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