Results for 'Judith Newton'

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  1. The Ethics of Consumption: Dvd.Ken Knisely, Lisa Newton & Judith Lichtenberg - 2002 - Milk Bottle Productions.
    In a hyper-consuming society, what questions should we ask ourselves as we survey the increasingly crowded planet on which we find ourselves? What are the moral effects of living amid unprecedented material plenty? With David Crocker, Lisa Newton, and Judith Lichtenberg.
     
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  2. The Ethics of Consumption: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed.Ken Knisely, David Crocker, Lisa Newton & Judith Lichtenberg - forthcoming - DVD.
    In a hyper-consuming society, what questions should we ask ourselves as we survey the increasingly crowded planet on which we find ourselves? What are the moral effects of living amid unprecedented material plenty? With David Crocker, Lisa Newton, and Judith Lichtenberg.
     
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  3.  21
    Feminist Differings: Recent Surveys of Feminist Literary Theory and CriticismThe New Feminist Criticism: Essays on Women, Literature, and TheorySexual/Textual Politics: Feminist Literary TheoryMaking a Difference: Feminist Literary CriticismConjuring: Black Women, Fiction, and Literary TraditionFeminist Criticism and Social Change: Sex, Class, and Race in Literature and Culture. [REVIEW]June Howard, Elaine Showalter, Toril Moi, Gayle Greene, Coppelia Kahn, Marjorie Pryse, Hortense J. Spillers, Judith Newton & Deborah Rosenfelt - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (1):167.
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    White Guys. [REVIEW]Judith Newton - 1998 - Feminist Studies 24 (3):572.
  5.  8
    Historicisms New and Old: "Charles Dickens" Meets Marxism, Feminism, and West Coast Foucault.Judith Newton - 1990 - Feminist Studies 16 (1):449-70.
  6.  2
    White GuysMasculinitiesManhood in America: A Cultural HistoryUnlocking the Iron Cage: The Men's Movement, Gender, Politics, and American CultureProving Manhood: Reflections on Men and SexismWhite Guys: Studies in Postmodern Domination and Difference.Judith Newton, R. W. Connell, Michael Kimmel, Michael Schwalbe, Timothy Beneke & Fred Pfeil - 1998 - Feminist Studies 24 (3):572.
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  7. Preface.Judith Newton & Nancy Hoffman - forthcoming - Feminist Studies.
     
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  8.  43
    Newton's Philosophy of Nature: Selections From His Writings.Isaac Newton - 1953 - Dover Publications.
    Aside from the Principia and occasional appearances of the Opticks , Newton' writings have remained largely inaccessible to students of philosophy, science, and literature as well as to other readers. This book provides a remedy with wide representation of the interests, problems, and diverse philosophic issues that preoccupied the greatest scientific mind of the seventeenth century. Grouped in sections corresponding to methods, principles, and theological considerations, these selections feature explanatory notes and cross-references to related essays.
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  9. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton.Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull - 1961 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (47):255-258.
     
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  10. Unpublished Scientific Papers of Isaac Newton.Isaac Newton, A. Rupert Hall & Marie Boas Hall - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):344-345.
     
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  11. Isaac Newton's Papers and Letters on Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton, I. Bernard Cohen & Robert E. Schofield - 1959 - Science and Society 23 (3):279-282.
     
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  12. Isaac Newton.Ivo Schneider, Kolumban Hutter, Isaac Newton & Friedrich Steinle - 1993 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 24 (1):169-185.
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  13.  8
    Newton's Clavis as Starkey's Key.William Newman & Isaac Newton - 1987 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 78:564-574.
  14.  23
    Newton on Rotating Bodies.J. W. Herivel & Isaac Newton - 1962 - Isis 53 (2):212-218.
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  15.  12
    Newton's Clavis as Starkey's Key.William Newman & Issac Newton - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):564-574.
  16. The Mathematical Papers of Isaac Newton, Volume VIII: 1697-1722.D. T. Whiteside & Isaac Newton - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (3):303-307.
     
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  17.  19
    Newton's Astronomical Apprenticeship: Notes of 1664/5.J. Mcguire, Martin Tamny & Isaac Newton - 1985 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 76:349-365.
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  18. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton.A. Rupert Hall, Isaac Newton & Laura Tilling - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (2):173-177.
     
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  19.  12
    Newton on Rotating Bodies.J. Herivel & Isaac Newton - 1962 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 53:212-218.
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  20. Franklin and Newton an Inquiry Into Speculative Newtonian Experimental Science and Franklin's Work in Electricity as an Example Thereof.I. Bernard Cohen, Isaac Newton & Benjamin Franklin - 1956 - American Philosophical Society.
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  21. Paradise Lost, a Poem. From the Text of T. Newton.John Milton & Thomas Newton - 1758
     
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  22. Paradise Regain'd, a Poem. To Which is Added Samson Agonistes: And Poems Upon Several Occasions. From the Text of T. Newton[REVIEW]John Milton & Thomas Newton - 1758
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  23. George Eliot, Romantic Humanist a Study of the Philosophical Structure of Her Novels /K.M. Newton. --. --.K. M. Newton - 1981 - Barnes & Noble Books, 1981.
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  24. I NTRODUCCIÓN M ucha gente tiende a pensar que con la teoría de la relatividad de Einstein, el concepto de tiempo absoluto de Isaac Newton quedó totalmente refutado. 1 En este trabajo nos proponemos explorar la idea de que, al.Einstein Y. La Noción De Newton - 2001 - Signos Filosóficos 5:65-81.
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  25. Principes mathématiques de la philosophie naturelle, t. I, Préfaces, suivies des Livres 1 et 2 de Newton : Du Mouvement des Corps, t. II : Livre 3 de Newton : Du système du monde. [REVIEW]Isaac Newton & Marquise du Chastellet - 1968 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 73 (3):378-382.
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  26. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton. Vol. III: 1688-1694.Isaac Newton & H. W. Turnbull - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):332-334.
     
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  27. The Correspondence of Isaac Newton, Vol. IV: 1694-1709.J. F. Scott & Isaac Newton - 1968 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):268-269.
     
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  28. Euler, Newton, and Foundations for Mechanics.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Newton. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-22.
    This chapter looks at Euler’s relation to Newton, and at his role in the rise of ‘Newtonian’ mechanics. It aims to give a sense of Newton’s complicated legacy for Enlightenment science, and to raise awareness that some key ‘Newtonian’ results really come from Euler.
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  29. Newton's Regulae Philosophandi.Zvi Biener - 2018 - In Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Isaac Newton. Oxford University Press.
    Newton’s Regulae philosophandi—the rules for reasoning in natural philosophy—are maxims of causal reasoning and induction. This essay reviews their significance for Newton’s method of inquiry, as well as their application to particular propositions within the Principia. Two main claims emerge. First, the rules are not only interrelated, they defend various facets of the same core idea: that nature is simple and orderly by divine decree, and that, consequently, human beings can be justified in inferring universal causes from limited (...)
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  30.  93
    Cotes’ Queries: Newton’s Empiricism and Conceptions of Matter.Zvi Biener & Chris Smeenk - 2012 - In Eric Schliesser & Andrew Janiak (eds.), Interpreting Newton. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 105-137.
    We argue that a conflict between two conceptions of “quantity of matter” employed in a corollary to proposition 6 of Book III of the Principia illustrates a deeper conflict between Newton’s view of the nature of extended bodies and the concept of mass appropriate for the theoretical framework of the Principia. We trace Newton’s failure to recognize the conflict to the fact that he allowed for the justification of natural philosophical claims by two types of a posteriori, empiricist (...)
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  31. Newton's Concepts of Force Among the Leibnizians.Marius Stan - 2017 - In Mordechai Feingold & Elizabethanne Boran (eds.), Reading Newton in Early Modern Europe. Leiden: Brill. pp. 244-289.
    I argue that the key dynamical concepts and laws of Newton's Principia never gained a solid foothold in Germany before Kant in the 1750s. I explain this absence as due to Leibniz. Thus I make a case for a robust Leibnizian legacy for Enlightenment science, and I solve what Jonathan Israel called “a meaningful historical problem on its own,” viz. the slow and hesitant reception of Newton in pre-Kantian Germany.
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  32.  50
    Newton’s Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton’s Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem”.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.
    This paper is a critical response to Hylarie Kochiras’ “Gravity and Newton’s substance counting problem,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 267–280. First, the paper argues that Kochiras conflates substances and beings; it proceeds to show that Newton is a substance monist. The paper argues that on methodological grounds Newton has adequate resources to respond to the metaphysical problems diagnosed by Kochiras. Second, the paper argues against the claim that Newton is committed to two (...)
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  33.  45
    Newton and Hume.Matias Kimi Slavov - forthcoming - Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    We may distinguish two interpretations of the relation between Newton’s natural philosophy and Hume’s science of human nature. The first interpretation can be called ‘traditional,’ the second ‘critical.’ This article will not side with either readings of Hume’s Newtonianism (or with some middle positions). Instead, essential points of confluence and divergence will be discussed.
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  34.  25
    A Newtonian Tale Details on Notes and Proofs in Geneva Edition of Newton's Principia.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2016 - BSHM-Journal of the British Society for the History of Mathematics:1-19.
    Based on our research regarding the relationship between physics and mathematics in HPS, and recently on Geneva Edition of Newton's Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–42) by Thomas Le Seur (1703–70) and François Jacquier (1711–88), in this paper we present some aspects of such Edition: a combination of editorial features and scientific aims. The proof of Proposition XLIII is presented and commented as a case study.
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  35.  94
    Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem.Hylarie Kochiras - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  36.  93
    The Certainty, Modality, and Grounding of Newton’s Laws.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser - 2017 - The Monist 100 (3):311-325.
    Newton began his Principia with three Axiomata sive Leges Motus. We offer an interpretation of Newton’s dual label and investigate two tensions inherent in his account of laws. The first arises from the juxtaposition of Newton’s confidence in the certainty of his laws and his commitment to their variability and contingency. The second arises because Newton ascribes fundamental status both to the laws and to the bodies and forces they govern. We argue the first is resolvable, (...)
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  37. Absolute Space and the Riddle of Rotation: Kant’s Response to Newton.Marius Stan - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 7:257-308.
    Newton had a fivefold argument that true motion must be motion in absolute space, not relative to matter. Like Newton, Kant holds that bodies have true motions. Unlike him, though, Kant takes all motion to be relative to matter, not to space itself. Thus, he must respond to Newton’s argument above. I reconstruct here Kant’s answer in detail. I prove that Kant addresses just one part of Newton’s case, namely, his “argument from the effects” of rotation. (...)
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  38. Newton's Ontology of Omnipresence and Infinite Space.J. E. McGuire & Edward Slowik - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6.
    This essay explores the role of God’s omnipresence in Newton’s natural philosophy, with special emphasis placed on how God is related to space. Unlike Descartes’ conception, which denies the spatiality of God, or Gassendi and Charleton’s view, which regards God as completely whole in every part of space, it is argued that Newton accepts spatial extension as a basic aspect of God’s omnipresence. The historical background to Newton’s spatial ontology assumes a large part of our investigation, but (...)
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  39.  16
    Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem.Hylarie Kochiras - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (3):267-280.
    A striking feature of Newton’s thought is the very broad reach of his empiricism, potentially extending even to immaterial substances, including God, minds, and should one exist, a non-perceiving immaterial medium. Yet Newton is also drawn to certain metaphysical principles—most notably the principle that matter cannot act where it is not—and this second, rationalist feature of his thought is most pronounced in his struggle to discover ‘gravity’s cause’. The causal problem remains vexing, for he neither invokes primary causation, (...)
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  40. Newton’s Challenge to Philosophy: A Programmatic Essay.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):101-128.
    I identify a set of interlocking views that became (and still are) very influential within philosophy in the wake of Newton’s success. These views use the authority of natural philosophy/mechanics to settle debates within philosophy. I label these “Newton’s Challenge.”.
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  41.  37
    An Ideology Critique of Recognition: Judith Butler in the Context of the Contemporary Debate on Recognition.Kristina Lepold - 2018 - Constellations 25 (3):474-484.
    Judith Butler is often referred to as a thinker who disputes the positive view of recognition shared by many social and political philosophers today and advances a more "ambivalent" account of recognition. While I agree with this general characterization of Butler’s account, I think that it is not yet adequately understood what precisely makes recognition ambivalent for Butler. Usually, Butler is read as providing an ethical critique of recognition. According to this reading, Butler believes that it is important for (...)
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  42. Newton's Absolute Time.H. Kochiras - 2016 - In S. Gerogiorgakis (ed.), Time and Tense: Unifying the Old and the New. Munich: Philosophia (Basic Philosophical Concepts). pp. 169-195.
    When Newton articulated the concept of absolute time in his treatise, Philosophae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy), along with its correlate, absolute space, he did not present it as anything controversial. Whereas his references to attraction are accompanied by the self- protective caveats that typically signal an expectation of censure, the Scholium following Principia’s definitions is free of such remarks, instead elaborating his ideas as clarifications of concepts that, in some manner, we already possess. This is (...)
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  43.  92
    Isaac Newton (1642–1727).Zvi Biener - 2017 - Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Isaac Newton is best known as a mathematician and physicist. He invented the calculus, discovered universal gravitation and made significant advances in theoretical and experimental optics. His master-work on gravitation, the Principia, is often hailed as the crowning achievement of the scientific revolution. His significance for philosophers, however, extends beyond the philosophical implications of his scientific discoveries. Newton was an able and subtle philosopher, working at a time when science was not yet recognized as an activity distinct from (...)
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  44. Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation and Hume's Conception of Causality.Matias Slavov - 2013 - Philosophia Naturalis 50 (2):277-305.
    This article investigates the relationship between Hume’s causal philosophy and Newton ’s philosophy of nature. I claim that Newton ’s experimentalist methodology in gravity research is an important background for understanding Hume’s conception of causality: Hume sees the relation of cause and effect as not being founded on a priori reasoning, similar to the way that Newton criticized non - empirical hypotheses about the properties of gravity. However, according to Hume’s criteria of causal inference, the law of (...)
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  45.  22
    Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica "Jesuit" Edition: The Tenor of a Huge Work.Raffaele Pisano & Paolo Bussotti - 2014 - Rendiconti Accademia Dei Lincei Matematica E Applicazioni 25 (4):413-444.
    This paper has the aim to provide a general view of the so called Jesuit Edition (hereafter JE) of Newton’s Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica (1739–1742). This edition was conceived to explain all Newton’s methods through an apparatus of notes and commentaries. Every Newton’s proposition is annotated. Because of this, the text – in four volumes – is one of the most important documents to understand Newton’s way of reasoning. This edition is well known, but systematic works (...)
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  46.  60
    Written in the Flesh: Isaac Newton on the Mind–Body Relation.Liam Dempsey - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (3):420-441.
    Isaac Newton’s views on the mind–body relation are of interest not only because of their somewhat unique departure from popular early modern conceptions of mind and its relation to body, but also because of their connections with other aspects of Newton’s thought. In this paper I argue that (1) Newton accepted an interesting sort of mind–body monism, one which defies neat categorization, but which clearly departs from Cartesian substance dualism, and (2) Newton took the power by (...)
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  47. Newton’s Neo-Platonic Ontology of Space.Edward Slowik - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):419-448.
    This paper investigates Newton’s ontology of space in order to determine its commitment, if any, to both Cambridge neo-Platonism, which posits an incorporeal basis for space, and substantivalism, which regards space as a form of substance or entity. A non-substantivalist interpretation of Newton’s theory has been famously championed by Howard Stein and Robert DiSalle, among others, while both Stein and the early work of J. E. McGuire have downplayed the influence of Cambridge neo-Platonism on various aspects of (...)’s own spatial hypotheses. Both of these assertions will be shown to be problematic on various grounds, with special emphasis placed on Stein’s influential case for a non-substantivalist reading. Our analysis will strive, nonetheless, to reveal the unique or forward-looking aspects of Newton’s approach, most notably, his critical assessment of substance ontologies, that help to distinguish his theory of space from his neo-Platonic contemporaries and predecessors. (shrink)
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  48.  94
    Newton's Metaphysics of Space: A “Tertium Quid” Betwixt Substantivalism and Relationism, or Merely a “God of the Gaps”?Edward Slowik - 2009 - Perspectives on Science 17 (4):pp. 429-456.
    This paper investigates the question of, and the degree to which, Newton’s theory of space constitutes a third-way between the traditional substantivalist and relationist ontologies, i.e., that Newton judged that space is neither a type of substance/entity nor purely a relation among such substances. A non-substantivalist reading of Newton has been famously defended by Howard Stein, among others; but, as will be demonstrated, these claims are problematic on various grounds, especially as regards Newton’s alleged rejection of (...)
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  49.  38
    Prismatic Equivalence – A New Case of Underdetermination: Goethe Vs. Newton on the Prism Experiments.Olaf L. Mueller - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):323-347.
    Goethe's objections to Newton's theory of light and colours are better than often acknowledged. You can accept the most important elements of these objections without disagreeing with Newton about light and colours. As I will argue, Goethe exposed a crucial weakness of Newton's methodological self-assessment. Newton believed that with the help of his prism experiments, he could prove that sunlight was composed of variously coloured rays of light. Goethe showed that this step from observation to theory (...)
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  50. Three Criticisms of Newton’s Inductive Argument in the Principia.Nicholas Maxwell - 2013 - Advances in Historical Studies 3 (1):2-11.
    In this paper, I discuss how Newton’s inductive argument of the Principia can be defended against criticisms levelled against it by Duhem, Popper and myself. I argue that Duhem’s and Popper’s criticisms can be countered, but mine cannot. It requires that we reconsider, not just Newton’s inductive argument in the Principia, but also the nature of science more generally. The methods of science, whether conceived along inductivist or hypothetico-deductivist lines, make implicit metaphysical presuppositions which rigour requires we make (...)
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