Results for 'Steven L. Bressler'

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  1. Large-Scale Brain Networks in Cognition: Emerging Methods and Principles.Steven L. Bressler & Vinod Menon - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):277-290.
  2.  61
    Cortical Coordination Dynamics and Cognition.Steven L. Bressler & J. A. Scott Kelso - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):26-36.
  3. Cognit Activation: A Mechanism Enabling Temporal Integration in Working Memory.Joaquín M. Fuster & Steven L. Bressler - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (4):207.
  4.  23
    Context Rules.Steven L. Bressler - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):85-85.
    It is proposed that cortical activity is normally coordinated across synaptically connected areas and that this coordination supports cognitive coherence relations. This view is consistent with the NMDA- hypoactivity hypothesis of the target article in regarding disorganization symptoms in schizophrenia as arising from disruption of normal interareal coordination. This disruption may produce abnormal contextual effects in the cortex that lead to anomalous cognitive coherence relations.
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  5.  32
    Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Modulates Supplementary Motor Area in Coordinated Unimanual Motor Behavior.Avisa Asemi, Karthik Ramaseshan, Ashley Burgess, Vaibhav A. Diwadkar & Steven L. Bressler - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  6.  20
    A Clearing in the Forest: Law, Life, and Mind.Steven L. Winter - 2001 - University of Chicago Press.
    Cognitive science is transforming our understanding of the mind. New discoveries are changing how we comprehend not just language, but thought itself. Yet, surprisingly little of the new learning has penetrated discussions and analysis of the most important social institution affecting our lives-the law. Drawing on work in philosophy, psychology, anthropology, linguistics, and literary theory, Steven L. Winter has created nothing less than a tour de force of interdisciplinary analysis. A Clearing in the Forest rests on the simple notion (...)
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  7.  77
    Book Review:The Miracle of Theism: Arguments for and Against the Existence of God. J. L. Mackie. [REVIEW]Steven L. Ross - 1982 - Ethics 94 (4):718-.
  8.  62
    The Relationship Between Intense Media Exposure and Change in Corporate Reputation.Steven L. Wartick - 1992 - Business and Society 31 (1):33-49.
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  9.  22
    Toward a Substantive Definition of the Corporate Issue Construct A Review and Synthesis of the Literature.Steven L. Wartick & John F. Mahon - 1994 - Business and Society 33 (3):293-311.
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  10. Knowledge as Acceptable Testimony.Steven L. Reynolds - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    Standard philosophical explanations of the concept of knowledge invoke a personal goal of having true beliefs, and explain the other requirements for knowledge as indicating the best way to achieve that goal. In this highly original book, Steven L. Reynolds argues instead that the concept of knowledge functions to express a naturally developing kind of social control, a complex social norm, and that the main purpose of our practice of saying and thinking that people 'know' is to improve our (...)
     
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  11.  29
    Measuring Corporate Reputation Definition and Data.Steven L. Wartick - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (4):371-392.
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  12.  56
    Reimagining Democratic Theory for Social Individuals.Steven L. Winter - 2011 - Zygon 46 (1):224-245.
    Abstract. The Western conception of the individual as a rational, self-directing agent is a mythology that organizes and distorts religion, science, economics, and politics. It produces an abstracted and atomized form of engagement that is fatal to collective self-governance. And it turns democracy into the enemy of equality. Considering the meaning of democracy and autonomy from a perspective that takes the subject as truly social would refocus our attention on the constitutive contexts and practices necessary for the production of citizens (...)
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  13.  25
    Paleolithic Ornaments: Implications for Cognition, Demography and Identity.Steven L. Kuhn & Mary C. Stiner - 2007 - Diogenes 54 (2):40 - 48.
    Beads and other ‘body ornaments’ are very widespread components of the archaeological record of early modern humans (Homo sapiens). They appear first in the Middle Stone Age in Africa, and somewhat later in the Early Upper Paleolithic of Eurasia. The manufacture and use of ornaments is widely considered to be evidence for significant developments in human cognition. In our view, the appearance of these objects represents the interaction of evolved cognitive capacities with changing social and demographic conditions. Body ornamentation is (...)
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  14. Testimony, Knowledge, and Epistemic Goals.Steven L. Reynolds - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 110 (2):139 - 161.
    Various considerations are adduced toshow that we require that a testifier know hertestimony. Such a requirement apparentlyimproves testimony. It is argued that the aimof improving testimony explains why we have anduse our concept of knowledge. If we were tointroduce a term of praise for testimony, usingit at first to praise testimony that apparentlyhelped us in our practical projects, it wouldcome to be used as we now use the word``know''.
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  15. The Sanctifying Work of the Holy Spirit: Revisiting Alston’s Interpersonal Model.Steven L. Porter & Brandon Rickabaugh - 2018 - Journal of Analytic Theology 6:112-130.
    Of the various loci of systematic theology that call for sustained philosophical investigation, the doctrine of sanctification stands out as a prime candidate. In response to that call, William Alston developed three models of the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit: the fiat model, the interpersonal model, and the sharing model. In response to Alston’s argument for the sharing model, this paper offers grounds for a reconsideration of the interpersonal model. We close with a discussion of some of the implications (...)
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  16.  86
    Flexible Cognitive Resources: Competitive Content Maps for Attention and Memory.Steven L. Franconeri, George A. Alvarez & Patrick Cavanagh - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):134-141.
  17. The Least Harm Principle May Require That Humans Consume a Diet Containing Large Herbivores, Not a Vegan Diet.Steven L. Davis - 2003 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):387-394.
    Based on his theory of animalrights, Regan concludes that humans are morallyobligated to consume a vegetarian or vegandiet. When it was pointed out to him that evena vegan diet results in the loss of manyanimals of the field, he said that while thatmay be true, we are still obligated to consumea vegetarian/vegan diet because in total itwould cause the least harm to animals (LeastHarm Principle, or LHP) as compared to currentagriculture. But is that conclusion valid? Isit possible that some other (...)
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  18. Justification as the Appearance of Knowledge.Steven L. Reynolds - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 163 (2):367-383.
    Adequate epistemic justification is best conceived as the appearance, over time, of knowledge to the subject. ‘Appearance’ is intended literally, not as a synonym for belief. It is argued through consideration of examples that this account gets the extension of ‘adequately justified belief’ at least roughly correct. A more theoretical reason is then offered to regard justification as the appearance of knowledge: If we have a knowledge norm for assertion, we do our best to comply with this norm when we (...)
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  19.  13
    Repairing Broken Trust Between Leaders and Followers: How Violation Characteristics Temper Apologies.Steven L. Grover, Marie-Aude Abid-Dupont, Caroline Manville & Markus C. Hasel - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (3):853-870.
    This study examines the conditions under which apologies help to elicit forgiveness and restore trust following trust violations between leaders and followers. The intentionality and severity of violations are examined in a critical incident study and a laboratory study. The results support a model in which forgiveness mediates the relation of apology quality and trust. More importantly, the moderation–mediation model shows that apology quality influenced forgiveness and subsequent trust following violations that were moderate in severity–intentionality combination. The effect of apologizing (...)
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  20.  31
    Can Businesses Effectively Regulate Employee Conduct?: The Antecedents of Rule Adherence in Work Settings.Tom R. Tyler & Steven L. Blader - forthcoming - Ethics.
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  21.  99
    Realism and the Meaning of 'Real'.Steven L. Reynolds - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):468–494.
    A new account of the semantic function (character) of ‘real’ and ‘really’ is defended. ‘Really’ as a sentential operator typically indicates that a report of what has been represented elsewhere ends and subsequent discourse is to be taken as making claims about the world. ‘Real’ and ‘really’ as applied to nouns or predicate phrases indicate that something is not being called an F merely because it represents an F. A way of drawing the distinction between realism and anti-realism based on (...)
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  22.  24
    Signaling Theory and Technologies of Communication in the Paleolithic.Steven L. Kuhn - 2014 - Biological Theory 9 (1):42-50.
    Between 300,000 and 250,000 years ago early humans in Africa and Eurasia began to use durable material substances and objects as media for signaling. Initially material signals were confined to ochre and other pigments, but over time objects such as beads were also added as technologies for sending messages. Changes in the types of materials used, their durability and costs, and the contexts of their disposal indicate a series of transitions in how early humans employed signaling media. Signaling theory from (...)
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  23.  62
    The Influence of Role Conflict and Self-Interest on Lying in Organizations.Steven L. Grover & Chun Hui - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (4):295-303.
    The self-interest paradigm predicts that unethical behavior occurs when such behavior benefits the actor. A recent model of lying behavior, however, predicts that lying behavior results from an individual''s inability to meet conflicting role demands. The need to reconcile the self-interest and role conflict theories prompted the present study, which orthogonally manipulated the benefit from lying and the conflicting role demands. A model integrating the two theories predicts the results, which showed that both elements — self benefit and role conflict (...)
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  24.  72
    Knowing How to Believe with Justification.Steven L. Reynolds - 1991 - Philosophical Studies 64 (3):273-292.
    Non-propositional experiences can help justify beliefs, contrary to recent claims made by Donald Davidson and Laurence Bonjour. It is argued that a perceptual belief is justified if there are no undermining beliefs and it was arrived at in response to an experience through an adequate exercise of properly learned recognitional skills.
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  25. Imagining Oneself to Be Another.Steven L. Reynolds - 1989 - Noûs 23 (5):615-633.
    Imagining that I am Napoleon is not (normally) imagining an impossibility. It is (or at least may be) just adopting a first person way of imagining Napoleon. The images and bits of narrative using 'I' are intended to refer to Napoleon and his surroundings, in something like the way that a salt shaker can stand for a regiment of troops when the general says "This is the third regiment' while explaining his plans at the breakfast table.
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  26.  90
    Swinburnian Atonement and the Doctrine of Penal Substitution.Steven L. Porter - 2004 - Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):228-241.
    This paper is a philosophical defense of the doctrine of penal substitution. I begin with a delineation of Richard Swinburne’s satisfaction-type theory of the atonement, exposing a weakness of it which motivates a renewed look at the theory of penal substitution. In explicating a theory of penal substitution, I contend that: (i) the execution of retributive punishment is morally justified in certain cases of deliberate wrongdoing; (ii) deliberate human sin against God constitutes such a case; and (iii) the transfer of (...)
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  27.  47
    Agent-Based Models as Fictive Instantiations of Ecological Processes.Steven L. Peck - 2012 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 4 (20130604).
    Frigg and Reiss (2009) argue that philosophical problems in simulation bear enough resemblance to recognized issues in the philosophy of modeling that they only pose challenges analogous to those found in standard analytic models used to represent natural systems. They suggest that there are no new philosophical problems in computer simulation modeling beyond those found in traditional mathematical modeling. Winsberg (2009) has countered that there appear to be genuinely new epistemological problems in simulation modeling because the knowledge obtained from them (...)
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  28.  50
    Making Up the Truth.Steven L. Reynolds - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (3):315-335.
    A recent account of the meaning of 'real' leads to a view of what anti-realism should be that resembles fictionalism, while not being committed to fictionalism as such or being subject to some of the more obvious objections to that view. This account of anti-realism explains how we might 'make up' what is true in areas such as mathematics or ethics, and yet these made-up truths are resistant to alterations, even by our collective decisions. Finally it is argued that the (...)
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  29.  10
    Biased Processing of Sad Faces: An ERP Marker Candidate for Depression Susceptibility.Steven L. Bistricky, Ruth Ann Atchley, Rick Ingram & Aminda O'Hare - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (3):470-492.
  30. Self-Recognition.Steven L. Reynolds - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):182-190.
    This paper attempts to give an experiential explanation of the phenomenon of immunity to error through misidentification in some of our judgments about ourselves. The main idea is that in most of these judgments we respond to the type of presentation -- e.g., proprioceptive -- and not to presented properties of the perceived object.
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  31. The Argument From Illusion.Steven L. Reynolds - 2000 - Noûs 34 (4):604-621.
    In an attempt to revive discussion of the argument from illusion this paper amends the classic version of the argument to avoid Austin's main objection. It then develops and defends a version of the intentional object reply to the argument, arguing that an "unendorsed story" account of reports of dreams and hallucinations avoids commitment to nonexistent objects.
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  32.  71
    Why We Should Prefer Knowledge.Steven L. Reynolds - 2008 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 32 (1):79-93.
    This paper discusses Plato’s question from the Meno : Why should we prefer knowledge that p over mere true belief that p? I find I just do prefer knowledge, and not for any further benefit that I am aware of in the particular case. But I should have that preference, because given our practice of approving of testimony only if uttered with knowledge, I could fail to prefer knowledge, when other things seem to me to be equal, only by having (...)
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  33.  63
    The Hermeneutics of Ecological Simulation.Steven L. Peck - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (3):383-402.
    Computer simulation has become important in ecological modeling, but there have been few assessments on how complex simulation models differ from more traditional analytic models. In Part I of this paper, I review the challenges faced in complex ecological modeling and how models have been used to gain theoretical purchase for understanding natural systems. I compare the use of traditional analytic simulation models and point how that the two methods require different kinds of practical engagement. I examine a case study (...)
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  34.  20
    Flexible Visual Processing of Spatial Relationships.Steven L. Franconeri, Jason M. Scimeca, Jessica C. Roth, Sarah A. Helseth & Lauren E. Kahn - 2012 - Cognition 122 (2):210-227.
  35.  21
    Coping With Paradox Multistakeholder Learning Dialogue as a Pluralist Sensemaking Process for Addressing Messy Problems.Jerry M. Calton & Steven L. Payne - 2003 - Business and Society 42 (1):7-42.
    A notable feature of paradox is recognition that seemingly contradictory terms are inextricably intertwined and interrelated—holding out the hope that something new can be learned from the cognitive tension contained within. Aram has characterized the central concern of the business and society field as the paradox of interdependent relations. Our study argues that this and related paradoxes can be addressed by engaging with others and trying to gain shared insight via an interactive, developmental, exploratory sensemaking process that can inform the (...)
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  36.  1
    Changing Emotion Norms in Marriage:: Love and Anger in U.S. Women's Magazines Since 1900.Steven L. Gordon & Francesca M. Cancian - 1988 - Gender and Society 2 (3):308-342.
    Throughout the twentieth century, women's magazines in the United States have socialized their readers to the “proper” expression of love and anger in marriage. Our analysis of a random sample of marital advice articles from 1900 to 1979 examines this cultural convergence of gender, marriage, and emotion. A qualitative analysis identifies techniques for socializing readers to the emotional culture of marriage and shows a historical change toward equating love with self-fulfillment and advocating the expression of anger. A quantitative analysis then (...)
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  37.  21
    Whose Boundary? An Individual Species Perspectival Approach to Borders.Steven L. Peck - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (3):274-279.
    Understanding ecological boundaries is recognized by ecologists as important for understanding ecosystem dynamics. All borders are borders in relation to some organism. However, much of the literature on habitat change ignores this basic ecological fact. In addition, borders are highly influenced by accidental or historical features of ecosystems, and researchers have in many cases defined them only in terms of convenience. Several viewpoints explored in this article reflect this skepticism about identifying ecosystems as real structured entities. I draw on Ghiselin’s (...)
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  38.  19
    Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science.Steven L. Goldman - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (3):392-393.
  39. Doxastic Voluntarism and the Function of Epistemic Evaluations.Steven L. Reynolds - 2011 - Erkenntnis 75 (1):19-35.
    Control of our own beliefs is allegedly required for the truth of epistemic evaluations, such as S ought to believe that p , or S ought to suspend judgment (and so refrain from any belief) whether p . However, we cannot usually believe or refrain from believing at will. I agree with a number of recent authors in thinking that this apparent conflict is to be resolved by distinguishing reasons for believing that give evidence that p from reasons that make (...)
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  40. Abortion and the Death of the Fetus.Steven L. Ross - 1982 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 11 (3):232-245.
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  41.  67
    Death and the Ecological Crisis.Steven L. Peck - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):105-109.
    In this essay I discuss the ways in which not recognizing that the death of organisms plays a part in our food producing systems, distances us from life’s ecological processes and explore how this plays a role in devaluing the sources of our food. I argue that modern society’s deep separation from our agricultural systems play a part in our current ecological illiteracy.
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  42.  27
    The Influence of Models in the Interpretation of Vigilance.Steven L. Lima - 1996 - In Colin Allen & D. Jamison (eds.), Readings in Animal Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 201--216.
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  43.  16
    Evaluational Illusions and Skeptical Arguments.Steven L. Reynolds - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):529-558.
    A traditional diagnosis of the error in the Cartesian skeptical arguments holds that they exploit our tendencies to take a representationalist view of perception. Thinking that we perceive only our own sensory states, it seems to us that our perceptual beliefs about physical objects must be justified qua explanations of those sensory states. Such justification requires us to have reasons to reject rival explanations, such as the skeptical hypotheses, which we lack. However, those who adopt the direct realist view of (...)
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  44.  31
    Evaluational Illusions and Skeptical Arguments.Steven L. Reynolds - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (3):529-558.
    A traditional diagnosis of the error in the Cartesian skeptical arguments holds that they exploit our tendencies to take a representationalist view of perception. Thinking (perhaps not too clearly) that we perceive only our own sensory states, it seems to us that our perceptual beliefs about physical objects must be justified qua explanations of those sensory states. Such justification requires us to have reasons to reject rival explanations, such as the skeptical hypotheses, which we lack. However, those who adopt the (...)
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  45. Proxy Functions and Inscrutability of Reference.Steven L. Reynolds - 1994 - Analysis 54 (4):228 - 235.
    Objection to Quine's argument for the inscrutability of reference. The proxy functions don't preserve the relations to experience, contrary to Quine's claims.
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  46.  8
    The Behavioral Ecology of Cultural Psychological Variation.Oliver Sng, Steven L. Neuberg, Michael E. W. Varnum & Douglas T. Kenrick - 2018 - Psychological Review 125 (5):714-743.
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  47.  5
    What Do the Five Ways Have to Dowith the Ascent of Mt. Carmel?Steven L. Porter - 2007 - Philosophia Christi 9 (1):189-200.
  48.  22
    Emerging Ethical Issues Related to the Use of Brain-Computer Interfaces for Patients with Total Locked-in Syndrome.Michael N. Abbott & Steven L. Peck - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (2):235-242.
    New brain-computer interface and neuroimaging techniques are making differentiation less ambiguous and more accurate between unresponsive wakefulness syndrome patients and patients with higher cognitive function and awareness. As research into these areas continues to progress, new ethical issues will face physicians of patients suffering from total locked-in syndrome, characterized by complete loss of voluntary muscle control, with retention of cognitive function and awareness detectable only with neuroimaging and brain-computer interfaces. Physicians, researchers, ethicists and hospital ethics committees should be aware of (...)
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  49.  12
    Business & Society/Business Ethics Courses Twenty Years at the Crossroads.Denis Collins & Steven L. Wartick - 1995 - Business and Society 34 (1):51-89.
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  50.  30
    Corporate Social Performance Profiling.Steven L. Wartick & John F. Mahon - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:326-336.
    Over time, how does a company's corporate social performance (CSP) as reflected through different stakeholders' views of the company (corporate reputation or CR) vary between a financial stakeholder group and a customer stakeholder group? The purpose of this research is to extend our previous work in the area of CSP profiling. So far, we have only applied the method to two companies in each of three industries for one year. This paper will focus on extending the application to the five (...)
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