Results for 'Jeffrey Dippmann'

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  1.  23
    Littlejohn, Ronnie, and Jeffrey Dippmann, Ed., Riding the Wind With Liezi. New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic: Albany: SUNY Press, 2011, Vii+264 Pages.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):405-408.
  2.  9
    Riding the Wind with Liezi: New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic Edited by Ronnie Littlejohn and Jeffrey Dippmann (Review). [REVIEW]Yuet Keung Lo - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (4):686-689.
  3.  11
    Dogen and the Koan Tradition: A Tale of Two Shobgenzo Texts, by Heine, Steven. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Walter Dippmann - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26:415.
  4. Sengzhao.Jeffrey Dippmann - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  5. Vimalakartis Triumphant Silence : Bridging Indian and East Asian Buddhism.Jeffrey Dippmann - 2009 - In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
     
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  6.  23
    Riding the Wind With Liezi: New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic.Ronnie Littlejohn & Jeffrey Dippmann (eds.) - 2011 - SUNY Press.
    The Liezi is the forgotten classic of Daoism. Along with the Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi, it's been considered a Daoist masterwork since the mid-eighth century, yet unlike those well-read works, the Liezi is little known and receives scant scholarly attention. Nevertheless, the Liezi is an important text that sheds valuable light on the early history of Daoism, particularly the formative period of sectarian Daoism. We do not know exactly what shape the original text took, but what remains is replete (...)
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  7.  17
    Jeffrey Barnouw is Professor of English and Comparative Literature in the University of Texas at Austin. He has Published Numerous Articles on Hobbes and Written Extensively on the History of Ideas, Especially 17th-and 18th-Century Thought. His Latest Research has Concentrated on Greek Philosophy and Literature as Well as Their Role in the Later European Tradition. His Recent. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Barnouw - 2008 - Hobbes Studies 21 (1):109-110.
    Hobbes conception of reason as computation or reckoning is significantly different in Part I of De Corpore from what I take to be the later treatment in Leviathan. In the late actual computation with words starts with making an affirmation, framing a proposition. Reckoning then has to do with the consequences of propositions, or how they connect the facts, states of affairs or actions which they refer tor account. Starting from this it can be made clear how Hobbes understood the (...)
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  8.  33
    On the Common Saying That It is Better That ten Guilty Persons Escape Than That One Innocent Suffer: Pro and Con: Jeffrey Reiman and Ernest Van den Haag.Jeffrey Reiman - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (2):226-248.
    In Zadig, published in 1748, Voltaire wrote of “the great principle that it is better to run the risk of sparing the guilty than to condemn the innocent.” At about the same time, Blackstone noted approvingly that “the law holds that it is better that ten guilty persons escape, than that one innocent suffer.” In 1824, Thomas Fielding cited the principle as an Italian proverb and a maxim of English law. John Stuart Mill endorsed it in an address to Parliament (...)
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  9. Jeffrey Timm (Ed.), Text in Context: Traditional Hermeneutics in South Asia.Jeffrey Timm (ed.) - 1992 - State University of New York Press.
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  10. The Nature and Structure of Content.Jeffrey C. King - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Belief in propositions has had a long and distinguished history in analytic philosophy. Three of the founding fathers of analytic philosophy, Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and G. E. Moore, believed in propositions. Many philosophers since then have shared this belief; and the belief is widely, though certainly not universally, accepted among philosophers today. Among contemporary philosophers who believe in propositions, many, and perhaps even most, take them to be structured entities with individuals, properties, and relations as constituents. For example, the (...)
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  11.  6
    Jeffrey Andrew Barash on Continental Divide: Heidegger, Cassirer, Davos, by Peter E. Gordon. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Andrew Barash - 2012 - History and Theory 51 (3):436-450.
    In 1929 Ernst Cassirer and Martin Heidegger participated in a momentous debate in Davos, Switzerland, which is widely held to have marked an important division in twentieth-century European thought. Peter E. Gordon’s recent book, Continental Divide: Heidegger, Cassirer, Davos, centers on this debate between these two philosophical adversaries. In his book Gordon examines the background of the debate, the issues that distinguished the respective positions of Cassirer and Heidegger, and the legacy of the debate for later decades. Throughout the work, (...)
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  12. Explaining Science: A Cognitive Approach.Jeffrey S. Poland - 1988 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):653-656.
  13. New Thinking About Propositions.Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames & Jeff Speaks - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Philosophy, science, and common sense all refer to propositions--things we believe and say, and things which are true or false. But there is no consensus on what sorts of things these entities are. Jeffrey C. King, Scott Soames, and Jeff Speaks argue that commitment to propositions is indispensable, and each defend their own views on the debate.
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  14.  31
    The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds.Jeffrey Alan Barrett - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Jeffrey Barrett presents the most comprehensive study yet of a problem that has puzzled physicists and philosophers since the 1930s.
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  15.  16
    Garland E. Allen;, Jeffrey Baker. Biology: Scientific Process and Social Issues. Xiv + 236 Pp., Figs., App., Index. Bethesda, Md.: Fitzgerald Science Press, 2001. $23.95. [REVIEW]Jeffrey S. Levinton - 2005 - Isis 96 (3):466-466.
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  16. Temporary Safety Hazards.Jeffrey Sanford Russell - 2016 - Noûs 50 (4):152-174.
    The Epistemic Objection says that certain theories of time imply that it is impossible to know which time is absolutely present. Standard presentations of the Epistemic Objection are elliptical—and some of the most natural premises one might fill in to complete the argument end up leading to radical skepticism. But there is a way of filling in the details which avoids this problem, using epistemic safety. The new version has two interesting upshots. First, while Ross Cameron alleges that the Epistemic (...)
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  17.  65
    The Jeffreys–Lindley Paradox and Discovery Criteria in High Energy Physics.Robert D. Cousins - 2017 - Synthese 194 (2):395-432.
    The Jeffreys–Lindley paradox displays how the use of a \ value ) in a frequentist hypothesis test can lead to an inference that is radically different from that of a Bayesian hypothesis test in the form advocated by Harold Jeffreys in the 1930s and common today. The setting is the test of a well-specified null hypothesis versus a composite alternative. The \ value, as well as the ratio of the likelihood under the null hypothesis to the maximized likelihood under the (...)
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  18.  42
    David Miller. A Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 59–61. - Karl R. Popper. A Comment on Miller's New Paradox of Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 1 , Pp. 61–69. - Karl R. Popper. A Paradox of Zero Information. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 141–143. - J. L. Mackie. Miller's so-Called Paradox of Information.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 144–147. - David Miller. On a so-Called so-Called Paradox: A Reply to Professor J. L. Mackie.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 17 No. 2, Pp. 147–149. - Jeffrey Bub and Michael Radner. Miller's Paradox of Information.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 1 , Pp. 63–67. - David Miller. The Straight and Narrow Rule of Induction: A Reply to Dr Bub and Mr Radner.The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 19 No. 2, Pp. 145. [REVIEW]Richard C. Jeffrey - 1970 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (1):124-127.
  19.  60
    Finding Structure in Time.Jeffrey L. Elman - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (2):179-211.
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  20.  7
    Jeffrey Hopkins Responds to David Tracy.Paul Jeffrey Hopkins - 1987 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 7.
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  21.  8
    Interpreting the Quantum World. Jeffrey Bub.Jeffrey Barrett - 2000 - Isis 91 (1):188-189.
  22.  18
    Commentaries by Jeffrey M. Prottas, Olga Jonasson, and John I. Kleinig.Jeffrey M. Prottas - 2002 - In Ruth F. Chadwick & Doris Schroeder (eds.), Applied Ethics: Critical Concepts in Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 3--140.
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  23.  30
    Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future Ed. By Jeffrey Metzger (Review).Jeffrey Church - 2013 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (3):495-497.
    In his introduction, Jeffrey Metzger states that “at some point in the past 20 or 30 years … Nietzsche’s name [became] no longer associated primarily with nihilism” (1). Metzger is pointing to the increasing contemporary scholarly interest in Nietzsche’s epistemology, naturalism, and metaethics. The worthy aim of this volume is to ask us to examine once again the underlying philosophical problem to which these views are a response, namely, nihilism. This volume helpfully reminds us that Nietzsche’s philosophical motivation still (...)
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  24. Aquinas's Ontology of the Material World: Change, Hylomorphism, and Material Objects.Jeffrey E. Brower - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Jeffrey E. Brower presents and explains the hylomorphic conception of the material world developed by Thomas Aquinas, according to which material objects are composed of both matter and form. In addition to presenting and explaining Aquinas's views, Brower seeks wherever possible to bring them into dialogue with the best recent literature on related topics. Along the way, he highlights the contribution that Aquinas's views make to a host of contemporary metaphysical debates, including the nature of change, composition, material constitution, (...)
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  25. Learning and Development in Neural Networks: The Importance of Starting Small.Jeffrey L. Elman - 1993 - Cognition 48 (1):71-99.
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  26.  18
    Innocents Lost: Proportional Sentencing and the Paradox of Collateral Damage: Jeffrey Brand-Ballard.Jeffrey Brand-Ballard - 2009 - Legal Theory 15 (2):67-105.
    Retributive restrictions are principles of justice according to which what a criminal deserves on account of his individual conduct and character restricts how states are morally permitted to treat him. The main arguments offered in defense of retributive restrictions involve thought experiments in which the state punishes the innocent, a practice known as telishment. In order to derive retributive restrictions from the wrongness of telishment, one must engage in moral argument from generalization. I show how generalization arguments of the same (...)
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  27.  3
    The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying.Jeffrey Paul Bishop - 2011 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    In this original and compelling book, Jeffrey P. Bishop, a philosopher, ethicist, and physician, argues that something has gone sadly amiss in the care of the dying by contemporary medicine and in our social and political views of death, as shaped by our scientific successes and ongoing debates about euthanasia and the "right to die"--or to live. __The Anticipatory Corpse: Medicine, Power, and the Care of the Dying__, informed by Foucault's genealogy of medicine and power as well as by (...)
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  28. Physicalism, the Philosophical Foundations.Jeffrey Poland - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    Physicalism is a program for building a unified system of knowledge about the world on the basis of the view that everything is a manifestation of the physical aspects of existence. Jeffrey Poland presents a systematic and comprehensive exploration of the philosophical foundations of this program. He investigates the core ideas, motivating values, and presuppositions of physicalism; the constraints upon an adequate formulation of physicalist doctrine; the epistemological and modal status, the scope, and the methodological roles of physicalist principles. (...)
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  29.  30
    Quentin Skinner's Hobbes and the Neo-Republican Project*: Jeffrey R. Collins.Jeffrey R. Collins - 2009 - Modern Intellectual History 6 (2):343-367.
    For nearly half a century, Quentin Skinner has been the world's foremost interpreter of Thomas Hobbes. When the contextualist mode of intellectual history now known as the “Cambridge School” was first asserting itself in the 1960s, the life and writings of John Locke were the primary topic for pioneers such as Peter Laslett and John Dunn. At that time, Hobbes was still the plaything of philosophers and political scientists, virtually all of whom wrote in an ahistorical, textual-analytic manner. Hobbes had (...)
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  30. Book Review: Media Ethics in the Newsroom and Beyond: A Book Review by Jeffrey Cole. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Cole - 1990 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 5 (1):63 – 65.
     
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  31. Groupthink.Jeffrey Sanford Russell, John Hawthorne & Lara Buchak - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1287-1309.
    How should a group with different opinions (but the same values) make decisions? In a Bayesian setting, the natural question is how to aggregate credences: how to use a single credence function to naturally represent a collection of different credence functions. An extension of the standard Dutch-book arguments that apply to individual decision-makers recommends that group credences should be updated by conditionalization. This imposes a constraint on what aggregation rules can be like. Taking conditionalization as a basic constraint, we gather (...)
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  32. Designating Propositions.Jeffrey C. King - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (3):341-371.
    Like many, though of course not all, philosophers, I believe in propositions. I take propositions to be structured, sentence-like entities whose structures are identical to the syntactic structures of the sentences that express them; and I have defended a particular version of such a view of propositions elsewhere. In the present work, I shall assume that the structures of propositions are at least very similar to the structures of the sentences that express them. Further, I shall assume that ordinary names (...)
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  33.  14
    Husserlian Phenomenology: A Unifying Interpretation.Jeffrey Yoshimi - 2016 - Springer Verlag.
    This chapter presents the main formalism of the book, which is used in subsequent chapters to describe a variety of concepts in Husserlian phenomenology, and thereby unify them. A dynamical systems approach to Husserl is introduced, and several dynamical laws of Husserlian phenomenology are described. The first is an expectation rule according to which expectations are determined by what a person knows, sees, and does. The second is a learning rule according to which background knowledge is updated in a specific (...)
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  34.  78
    Jeffrey Conditioning and External Bayesianity.Carl Wagner - 2010 - Logic Journal of the IGPL 18 (2):336-345.
    Suppose that several individuals who have separately assessed prior probability distributions over a set of possible states of the world wish to pool their individual distributions into a single group distribution, while taking into account jointly perceived new evidence. They have the option of first updating their individual priors and then pooling the resulting posteriors or first pooling their priors and then updating the resulting group prior. If the pooling method that they employ is such that they arrive at the (...)
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  35.  37
    The Eyes of the People: Democracy in an Age of Spectatorship.Jeffrey Edward Green (ed.) - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    For centuries it has been assumed that democracy must refer to the empowerment of the People's voice. In this pioneering book, Jeffrey Edward Green makes the case for considering the People as an ocular entity rather than a vocal one. Green argues that it is both possible and desirable to understand democracy in terms of what the People gets to see instead of the traditional focus on what it gets to say. The Eyes of the People examines democracy from (...)
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  36. Foucault Beyond Foucault: Power and its Intensifications Since 1984.Jeffrey Nealon - 2007 - Stanford University Press.
    In _Foucault Beyond Foucault_ Jeffrey Nealon argues that critics have too hastily abandoned Foucault's mid-career reflections on power, and offers a revisionist reading of the philosopher's middle and later works. Retracing power's "intensification" in Foucault, Nealon argues that forms of political power remain central to Foucault's concerns. He allows us to reread Foucault's own conceptual itinerary and, more importantly, to think about how we might respond to the mutations of power that have taken place since the philosopher's death in (...)
     
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  37.  9
    Consciousness.Jeffrey F. Sicha - 1991 - Noûs 25 (4):553-561.
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  38.  95
    Semantics for Monists.Jeffrey King - 2006 - Mind 115 (460):1023-1058.
    Assume that the only thing before you is a statue made of some alloy. Call those who think that there is one thing before you in such a case monists. Call those who think there are at least two things before you in such a case pluralists. The most common arguments for pluralism run as follows. The statue is claimed to have some property P that the piece of alloy lacks (or vice versa), and hence it is concluded that they (...)
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  39.  12
    Thomas Aquinas, Questions on Love and Charity: Summa Theologiae, Secunda Secundae, Questions 23–46, Ed. And Trans. Robert Miner with Essays by Jeffrey A. Bernstein, Dominic Doyle, Mark D. Jordan, Robert Miner, and Sheryl Overmyer. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2016. Paper. Pp. Xiv, 400. $25. ISBN: 978-0-300-19541-5. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Hause - 2018 - Speculum 93 (3):783-784.
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  40.  51
    An Examination of Differences in Ethical Decision-Making Between Canadian Business Students and Accounting Professionals.Jeffrey R. Cohen, Laurie W. Pant & David J. Sharp - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 30 (4):319 - 336.
    This study investigates the differences in individuals'' ethical decision making between Canadian university business students and accounting professionals. We examine the differences in three measures known to be important in the ethical decision-making process: ethical awareness, ethical orientation, and intention to perform questionable acts. We tested for differences in these three measures in eight different questionable actions among three groups: students starting business studies, those in their final year of university, and professional accountants.The measures of awareness capture the extent to (...)
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  41.  64
    The Believing Primate: Scientific, Philosophical, and Theological Reflections on the Origin of Religion.Jeffrey Schloss & Michael J. Murray (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Over the last two decades, scientific accounts of religion have received a great deal of scholarly and popular attention both because of their intrinsic interest and because they are widely as constituting a threat to the religion they analyse. The Believing Primate aims to describe and discuss these scientific accounts as well as to assess their implications. The volume begins with essays by leading scientists in the field, describing these accounts and discussing evidence in their favour. Philosophical and theological reflections (...)
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  42.  33
    Jeffrey Meets Kolmogorov: A General Theory of Conditioning.Alexander Meehan & Snow Zhang - 2020 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 49 (5):941-979.
    Jeffrey conditionalization is a rule for updating degrees of belief in light of uncertain evidence. It is usually assumed that the partitions involved in Jeffrey conditionalization are finite and only contain positive-credence elements. But there are interesting examples, involving continuous quantities, in which this is not the case. Q1 Can Jeffrey conditionalization be generalized to accommodate continuous cases? Meanwhile, several authors, such as Kenny Easwaran and Michael Rescorla, have been interested in Kolmogorov’s theory of regular conditional distributions (...)
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  43.  3
    Interpreting the Quantum World by Jeffrey Bub. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Barrett - 2000 - Isis 91:188-189.
  44.  65
    On the Meaning of Words and Dinosaur Bones: Lexical Knowledge Without a Lexicon.Jeffrey L. Elman - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (4):547-582.
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  45. Possible Worlds and the Objective World.Jeffrey Sanford Russell - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 90 (2):389-422.
    David Lewis holds that a single possible world can provide more than one way things could be. But what are possible worlds good for if they come apart from ways things could be? We can make sense of this if we go in for a metaphysical understanding of what the world is. The world does not include everything that is the case—only the genuine facts. Understood this way, Lewis's “cheap haecceitism” amounts to a kind of metaphysical anti-haecceitism: it says there (...)
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  46.  37
    The Blood of the 3,000: Jeffrey Gordon Reflects on 9/11, and Sees That It Didn't Wake Us.Jeffrey Gordon - 2008 - Philosophy Now 68:21-21.
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  47.  82
    The Moral Demands of Memory.Jeffrey Blustein - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite an explosion of studies on memory in historical and cultural studies, there is relatively little in moral philosophy on this subject. In this book, Jeffrey Blustein provides a systematic and philosophically rigorous account of a morality of memory. Drawing on a broad range of philosophical and humanistic literatures, he offers a novel examination of memory and our relations to people and events from our past, the ways in which memory is preserved and transmitted, and the moral responsibilities associated (...)
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  48. Quality and Quantifiers.Jeffrey Sanford Russell - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):562-577.
    I examine three ‘anti-object’ metaphysical views: nihilism, generalism, and anti-quantificationalism. After setting aside nihilism, I argue that generalists should be anti-quantificationalists. Along the way, I attempt to articulate what a ‘metaphysically perspicuous’ language might even be.
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  49.  23
    Perceiving, Remembering, and Communicating Structure in Events.Jeffrey M. Zacks, Barbara Tversky & Gowri Iyer - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (1):29.
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  50. Quantum Physics in Neuroscience and Psychology: A Neurophysical Model of Mind–Brain Interaction.Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard - 2005 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 360:1309-1327.
    Neuropsychological research on the neural basis of behaviour generally posits that brain mechanisms will ultimately suffice to explain all psychologically described phenomena. This assumption stems from the idea that the brain is made up entirely of material particles and fields, and that all causal mechanisms relevant to neuroscience can therefore be formulated solely in terms of properties of these elements. Thus, terms having intrinsic mentalistic and/or experiential content (e.g. ‘feeling’, ‘knowing’ and ‘effort’) are not included as primary causal factors. This (...)
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