Results for 'David N. Aspin'

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  1.  6
    Logical empiricism and post₋empiricism in educational discourse.David N. Aspin (ed.) - 1997 - Johannesburg: [Distributed by] Thorold's Africana Books.
  2.  5
    A Problem-Solving Approach to Addressing Current Global Challenges in Education.Judith D. Chapman & David N. Aspin - 2013 - British Journal of Educational Studies 61 (1):49-62.
    This paper begins with an analysis of global problems shaping education, particularly as they impact upon learning and life chances. In addressing these problems a range of philosophical positions and controversies are considered, including: traditional romantic and institutional views of schooling; and more recent maximalist, neo-liberal, emancipatory and post-modern-perspectives of lifelong learning. In this paper we argue that these do not represent 'the last word' on the provision of learning and the enhancement of life chances and instead we put forward (...)
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  3.  8
    Philosophy and Human Movement.D. N. Aspin & David Best - 1980 - British Journal of Educational Studies 28 (1):60.
  4.  7
    Lucretius and the transformation of Greek wisdom.David N. Sedley - 1998 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book is designed to appeal both to those interested in Roman poetry and to specialists in ancient philosophy. In it David Sedley explores Lucretius ' complex relationship with Greek culture, in particular with Empedocles, whose poetry was the model for his own, with Epicurus, the source of his philosophical inspiration, and with the Greek language itself. He includes a detailed reconstruction of Epicurus' great treatise On Nature, and seeks to show how Lucretius worked with this as his sole (...)
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  5.  17
    Quantales and (noncommutative) linear logic.David N. Yetter - 1990 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (1):41-64.
  6.  6
    The Species Problem: Biological Species, Ontology, and the Metaphysics of Biology.David N. Stamos - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    Stamos squarely confronts the problem of determining what a biological species is, whether species are real, and the nature of their reality. He critically considers the evolution of the major contemporary views of species and also offers his own solution to the species problem.
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  7.  6
    The Species Problem: Biological Species, Ontology, and the Metaphysics of Biology.David N. Stamos - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    Stamos squarely confronts the problem of determining what a biological species is, whether species are real, and the nature of their reality. He critically considers the evolution of the major contemporary views of species and also offers his own solution to the species problem.
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  8.  8
    Species, languages, and the horizontal/vertical distinction.David N. Stamos - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (2):171-198.
    In addition to the distinction between species as a category and speciesas a taxon, the word species is ambiguous in a very different butequally important way, namely the temporal distinction between horizontal andvertical species. Although often found in the relevant literature, thisdistinction has thus far remained vague and undefined. In this paper the use ofthe distinction is explored, an attempt is made to clarify and define it, andthen the relation between the two dimensions and the implications of thatrelation are examined. (...)
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  9.  30
    Quantum indeterminism and evolutionary biology.David N. Stamos - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (2):164-184.
    In "The Indeterministic Character of Evolutionary Theory: No 'Hidden Variables Proof' But No Room for Determinism Either," Brandon and Carson (1996) argue that evolutionary theory is statistical because the processes it describes are fundamentally statistical. In "Is Indeterminism the Source of the Statistical Character of Evolutionary Theory?" Graves, Horan, and Rosenberg (1999) argue in reply that the processes of evolutionary biology are fundamentally deterministic and that the statistical character of evolutionary theory is explained by epistemological rather than ontological considerations. In (...)
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  10.  17
    Popper, falsifiability, and evolutionary biology.David N. Stamos - 1996 - Biology and Philosophy 11 (2):161-191.
    First, a brief history is provided of Popper's views on the status of evolutionary biology as a science. The views of some prominent biologists are then canvassed on the matter of falsifiability and its relation to evolutionary biology. Following that, I argue that Popper's programme of falsifiability does indeed exclude evolutionary biology from within the circumference of genuine science, that Popper's programme is fundamentally incoherent, and that the correction of this incoherence results in a greatly expanded and much more realistic (...)
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  11.  16
    Buffon, Darwin, and the non-individuality of species – a reply to Jean Gayon.David N. Stamos - 1998 - Biology and Philosophy 13 (3):443-470.
    Gayon's recent claim that Buffon developed a concept of species as physical individuals is critically examined and rejected. Also critically examined and rejected is Gayon's more central thesis that as a consequence of his analysis of Buffon's species concept, and also of Darwin's species concept, it is clear that modern evolutionary theory does not require species to be physical individuals. While I agree with Gayon's conclusion that modern evolutionary theory does not require species to be physical individuals, I disagree with (...)
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  12.  12
    Pre-Darwinian taxonomy and essentialism – a reply to Mary Winsor.David N. Stamos - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):79-96.
    Mary Winsor (2003) argues against the received view that pre-Darwinian taxonomy was characterized mainly by essentialism. She argues, instead, that the methods of pre-Darwinian taxonomists, in spite of whatever their beliefs, were that of clusterists, so that the received view, propagated mainly by certain modern biologists and philosophers of biology, should at last be put to rest as a myth. I argue that shes right when it comes to higher taxa, but wrong when it comes the most important category of (...)
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  13.  3
    Editorial.D. N. Aspin Executive Editor - 1992 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 24 (1):iii–iv.
  14.  6
    Editorial.D. N. Aspin Executive Editor - 1995 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (2):iii–v.
  15.  4
    Evolution and the Big Questions: Sex, Race, Religion, and Other Matters.David N. Stamos - 2008 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This provocative text considers whether evolutionary explanations can be used to clarify some of life’s biggest questions. Examines topics of race, sex, gender, the nature of language, religion, ethics, knowledge, consciousness and ultimately, the meaning of life Each chapter presents a main topic, together with discussion of related ideas and arguments from various perspectives Addresses questions such as: Did evolution make men and women fundamentally different? Is the concept of race merely a social construction? Is morality, including universal human rights, (...)
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  16.  4
    Evolution and the Big Questions: Sex, Race, Religion, and Other Matters.David N. Stamos - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This provocative text considers whether evolutionary explanations can be used to clarify some of life’s biggest questions. Examines topics of race, sex, gender, the nature of language, religion, ethics, knowledge, consciousness and ultimately, the meaning of life Each chapter presents a main topic, together with discussion of related ideas and arguments from various perspectives Addresses questions such as: Did evolution make men and women fundamentally different? Is the concept of race merely a social construction? Is morality, including universal human rights, (...)
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  17.  5
    Darwin's Species Category Realism.David N. Stamos - 1999 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 21 (2):137 - 186.
    Ever since Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species was published, the received view has been that Darwin literally thought of species as not extra-mentally real. In 1969 Michael Ghiselin upset the received view by interpreting Darwin to mean that species taxa are indeed real but not the species category. In 1985 John Beatty took Ghiselin's thesis a step further by providing a strategy theory to explain why Darwin would say one thing (his repeated nominalistic definition of species) and do (...)
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  18.  7
    What is Wrong with “Ethics for Sale”? An Analysis of the Many Issues That Complicate the Debate about Conflicts of Interests in Bioethics.David N. Sontag - 2007 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):175-186.
    Bioethics, once a four-letter word in the private sector, is now an integral part of the decisionmaking process of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. And bioethicists, once confined to the classroom and limited to abstract, philosophical discussions about what is right and wrong in medicine and medical research, now play an important role in the practical implementation of ethical boundaries. Bioethicists increasingly are hired by biomedical companies as consultants to highlight and help resolve complex ethical issues that arise in the companies’ (...)
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  19.  2
    Wily Elites and Spirited Peoples in Machiavelli’s Republicanism.David N. Levy - 2014 - Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books.
    In this book, author David N. Levy uses Machiavelli’s conflict between the elite and the people as the lens through which to understand the other major features of his republicanism. Through analyzing his Discourses on Livy, Levy shows that Machiavelli’s principles can provide support for, and constructive criticism of, modern liberal democracy.
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  20.  13
    Mountain Goddess: Gender and Politics in a Himalayan Pilgrimage.David N. Lorenzen & William S. Sax - 1995 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 115 (3):505.
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  21.  33
    Science, site and speech.David N. Livingstone - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):71-98.
    An awareness of the significance of location in the production and dissemination of scientific knowledge has brought a new dimension to recent work on the sociology of science. But the importance of speech in scientific enterprises has been less well developed. This article explores the idea of `spaces of speech' by underscoring the connections between location and locution. It develops a case study of how Darwinian evolution was talked about in different sites using examples from Ireland and the American South (...)
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  22.  9
    Was Darwin Really a Species Nominalist?David N. Stamos - 1996 - Journal of the History of Biology 29 (1):127 - 144.
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  23.  7
    Darwin and the Nature of Species.David N. Stamos - 2006 - State University of New York Press.
    Examines Darwin’s concept of species in a philosophical context.
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  24. The negated conjunction in Stoicism.David N. Sedley - 1984 - Elenchos 5 (311):16.
  25.  4
    Darwinism and Calvinism: The Belfast-Princeton Connection.David N. Livingstone - 1992 - Isis 83 (3):408-428.
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  26.  6
    Informal Logic: A Handbook for Critical Argument.David N. Walton - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is an introductory guide to the basic principles of constructing good arguments and criticizing bad ones. It is nontechnical in its approach, and is based on 150 key examples, each discussed and evaluated in clear, illustrative detail. The author explains how errors, fallacies, and other key failures of argument occur. He shows how correct uses of argument are based on sound argument strategies for reasoned persuasion and critical questions for responding. Among the many subjects covered are: techniques of posing, (...)
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  27.  10
    Total liberation: the power and promise of animal rights and the radical earth movement.David N. Pellow - 2014 - Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
    When in 2001 Earth Liberation Front activists drove metal spikes into hundreds of trees in Gifford Pinchot National Forest, they were protesting the sale of a section of the old-growth forest to a timber company. But ELF's communiqu on the action went beyond the radical group's customary brief. Drawing connections between the harms facing the myriad animals who make their home in the trees and the struggles for social justice among ordinary human beings resisting exclusion and marginalization, the dispatch declared, (...)
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  28.  28
    Popper, laws, and the exclusion of biology from genuine science.David N. Stamos - 2007 - Acta Biotheoretica 55 (4):357-375.
    The primary purpose of this paper is to argue that biologists should stop citing Karl Popper on what a genuinely scientific theory is. Various ways in which biologists cite Popper on this matter are surveyed, including the use of Popper to settle debates on methodology in phylogenetic systematics. It is then argued that the received view on Popper—namely, that a genuinely scientific theory is an empirically falsifiable one—is seriously mistaken, that Popper’s real view was that genuinely scientific theories have the (...)
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  29.  6
    Upholding the Common Life: The Community of Mirabai.David N. Lorenzen & Parita Mukta - 1995 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 115 (4):692.
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  30.  2
    Bodies of Tomorrow: Technology, Subjectivity, Science Fiction (review).David N. Samuelson - 2010 - Utopian Studies 21 (1):183-191.
  31.  4
    Research on human subjects: ethics, law, and social policy.David N. Weisstub (ed.) - 1998 - Kidlington, Oxford, UK: Pergamon Press.
    There have been serious controversies in the latter part of the 20th century about the roles and functions of scientific and medical research. In whose interests are medical and biomedical experiments conducted and what are the ethical implications of experimentation on subjects unable to give competent consent? From the decades following the Second World War and calls for the global banning of medical research to the cautious return to the notion that in controlled circumstances, medical research on human subjects is (...)
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  32.  10
    Socrates’ Place in the History of Teleology.David N. Sedley - 2008 - Elenchos 29 (2):317-334.
  33.  20
    Neoteny and the meaning of life.David N. Stamos - forthcoming - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology.
  34.  7
    The Friendship Model:A Reply to Illingworth.David N. James - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (2):142-146.
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  35.  14
    Warrior Ascetics in Indian History.David N. Lorenzen - 1978 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 98 (1):61-75.
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  36.  2
    Finding revelation in anthropology: Alexander Winchell, William Robertson Smith and the heretical imperative.David N. Livingstone - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Science 48 (3):435-454.
    Anthropological inquiry has often been considered an agent of intellectual secularization. Not least is this so in the sphere of religion, where anthropological accounts have often been taken to represent the triumph of naturalism. This metanarrative, however, fails to recognize that naturalistic explanations could sometimes be espousedforreligious purposes and in defence of confessional creeds. This essay examines two late nineteenth-century figures – Alexander Winchell in the United States and William Robertson Smith in Britain – who found in anthropological analysis resources (...)
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  37.  10
    Myths of the Dog-Man.David N. Lorenzen & David Gordon White - 1992 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 112 (3):511.
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  38.  10
    Is It Painful to Think? Conversations with Arne Næss.David Rothenberg & Arne Næss - 1993 - U of Minnesota Press.
    This is the compelling story of one of the most fascinating thinkers of the twentieth century- a richly toned portrait of a modern-day Thoreau.
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  39.  19
    Akratic Ignorance and Endoxic Inquiry.David N. Mcneill - 2018 - Review of Metaphysics 72 (2):259-299.
    Aristotle claims in the Metaphysics that in order to be resourceful in first philosophic inquiry it is useful to go through perplexity well. In this essay, the author argues that that perplexity plays a parallel role in Aristotle’s account of practical, deliberative inquiry in the Nicomachean Ethics. He does so by offering an interpretation of the relation between Aristotle’s account of akratic ignorance in Nicomachean Ethics 7 and his emphasis on the necessity of going through perplexity when inquiring into akrasia. (...)
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  40. The Sacrifice We Offer.David N. Power - 1987
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  41.  6
    The Medical Malpractice Insurance Crisis, Again.David N. Hoffman - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (2):15.
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  42.  4
    Public spectacle and scientific theory: William Robertson Smith and the reading of evolution in Victorian Scotland.David N. Livingstone - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (1):1-29.
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  43.  13
    Edgar Allan Poe, Eureka, and Scientific Imagination.David N. Stamos - 2017 - SUNY Press.
    Explores the science and creative process behind Poe’s cosmological treatise. Silver Winner for Philosophy, 2017 Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards In 1848, almost a year and a half before Edgar Allan Poe died at the age of forty, his book Eureka was published. In it, he weaved together his scientific speculations about the universe with his own literary theory, theology, and philosophy of science. Although Poe himself considered it to be his magnum opus, Eureka has mostly been overlooked (...)
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  44.  4
    A clinical method in applied social science.David N. Ulrich - 1949 - Philosophy of Science 16 (3):243-249.
    In his memorandum, “The Role of Applied Social Science in the Formation of Policy,” Professor Merton has stated that “… all applied social science involves advice.” While this statement obviously does not mean that the social scientist is limited solely to giving advice, it does imply a frame of reference in which the primary function of the social scientist appears to be obtaining information, analyzing it, and presenting the results to the policy-maker.
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  45.  11
    Kant’s Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills.David N. James - 1991 - Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
  46.  8
    Kant’s Virtue Ethics and the Cultivation of Moral Skills.David N. James - 1991 - Social Philosophy Today 6:29-41.
  47. Expanding the Duty to Rescue to Climate Migration.David N. Hoffman, Anne Zimmerman, Camille Castelyn & Srajana Kaikini - 2022 - Voices in Bioethics 8.
    Photo by Jonathan Ford on Unsplash ABSTRACT Since 2008, an average of twenty million people per year have been displaced by weather events. Climate migration creates a special setting for a duty to rescue. A duty to rescue is a moral rather than legal duty and imposes on a bystander to take an active role in preventing serious harm to someone else. This paper analyzes the idea of expanding a duty to rescue to climate migration. We address who should have (...)
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  48.  7
    A computational investigation of feedforward and feedback processing in metacontrast backward masking.David N. Silverstein - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  49.  5
    Maladies of modernity: scientism and the deformation of political order.David N. Whitney - 2014 - South Bend, Indiana: St. Augustine's Press.
    This work explores the complex relationship between science and politics. More specifically, it focuses on the problem of scientism. Scientism is a deformation of science, which unnecessarily restricts the scope of scientific inquiry by placing a dogmatic faith in the method of the natural sciences. Its adherents call for nothing less than a complete transformation of society. Science becomes the idol that can magically cure the perpetual maladies of modern society and of human nature itself. Whitney demonstrates that scientism is (...)
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  50.  11
    Social Freedom and Self-Actualization: “Normative Reconstruction” as a Theory of Justice.David N. McNeill - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (2):153-169.
    In Freedom's Right Axel Honneth seeks to provide a theory of justice by appropriating Hegel's account of ethical substance in the Philosophy of Right, but he wants to do so without endorsing Hegel's more robust idealist commitments. I argue that this project can only succeed if Honneth can offer an alternative, comparatively robust demonstration of the rationality and normative coherence of existing social institutions. I contend that the grounds Honneth provides for this claim are insufficient for his purposes. In particular, (...)
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