Results for 'J. A. H. Way'

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  1.  18
    Grace Lucile Beede: Vergil and Aratus. A Study in the Art of Translation. Pp. Iii+90. Private Edition, Distributed by the University of Chicago Libraries, 1936. Paper[REVIEW]J. A. H. Way - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (01):55-.
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  2.  26
    Emanuele Cesareo: Le Orazioni Nell' Opera di Sallustio. Pp. Iv + 112. (Published by the Author at Palermo, Via Catania, N. 15.) 1938. Paper, L. 70 (Abroad). [REVIEW]J. A. H. Way - 1938 - The Classical Review 52 (05):198-.
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  3.  26
    Latin Word-Order Herbert Fankhänel: Verb Und Satz in der Lateinischen Prosa Bis Sallust; Eine Untersuchung Über Die Stellung des Verbs. Pp. 273. (Neue Deutsche Forschungen, Band 182.) Berlin: Junker Und Dünnhaupt, 1938. Paper, RM. 10[REVIEW]J. A. H. Way - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (02):69-.
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  4.  18
    The Plague of Athens: 430428 B.C. Epidemic and Epizoötic.J. A. H. Wylie & H. W. Stubbs - 1983 - Classical Quarterly 33 (01):6-.
    In a recent re-assessment of the medical aspects of the Plague of Athens which is, to date, the most scholarly and comprehensive, Poole and Holladay have (...)emphasized the tendency of many infectious diseases markedly to decline in virulence over decades and centuries and, sometimes, significantly to change their clinical manifestations. In the light of modern medicine they consider four possibilities: The Plague was a disease which still exists today. This they regard as improbable, It still exists in some remote place or places unknown to medical science. This is discussed and dismissed, It became extinct, It was caused by an agent which nowadays causes a significantly different clinical syndrome. They conclude as follows: ‘The truth, we suggest, almost certainly lies in possibility or . But we can see no way of choosing between them. On either view the question: “What was the Athenian Plague?” is in principle unanswerable if the questioner is wanting to attach to the Plagsie the name of some modern disease or diseases’. (shrink)
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  5.  23
    Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey.H. J. Mccloskey - 1974 - Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. (...)My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in natural, human rights; the liberalism of which Kant is the best known exponent, which is based on respect for persons as ends in themselves; and the liberalism of Bentham and the Mills, which is based upon utilitarian ethical theories and most especially with concern for pleasure and the reduction of pain. These different elements of liberalism have led to different emphases and different political and social arrangements, but all have involved a concern to safeguard values and to use force to that end. Today they constitute strands of thought which go to make up liberal thought as we now know it, hence it is not simply a historical fact about liberalism, but a fact about its philosophical basis, that liberalism is firmly involved in certain value and moral commitments. In the remainder of this paper I shall seek to bring this out. (shrink)
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  6.  43
    Some Translations - The Antigone of Sophocles, Translated by R. C. Trevelyan. London: Hodder and Stoughton. 3s. 6d. Net. - The Helen of Euripides, Translated by J. T. Sheppard. Cambridge: University Press. 2s. Net. - A Few Words on Verse Translation From Latin Poets, by W. E. Heitland. Cambridge : University Press. 2s. 6d. Net. - Catullus, Translated by SirWilliam Marris, with the Latin Text. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 5s. Net. - The Loves of Dido and A Eneas, Being the Fourth Book of the Aeneid, Translated Into English Verse by Richard Fanshawe, Edited, with Notes, by A. L. Irtine. Oxford: Blackwell. 6s. Net. - The A Eneid of Virgil in English Verse, Vol. II., Books IV.-VI., by A. S. Way. London: Macmillan. 5s. Net. - Martial's Epigrams, Translations and Imitations, by A. L. Francis and H. F. Tatum. Cambridge: University Press. 7s. 6d. Net[REVIEW]R. G. Nisbet - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (02):74-76.
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  7.  35
    Some School Books Greek Through English. By A. S. Way, D.Litt. J. M. Dent and Sons. 3s. 6d.H. Williamson - 1926 - The Classical Review 40 (05):159-.
  8.  70
    Another Peep Behind the Veil.J. McKie, H. Kuhse, J. Richardson & P. Singer - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (4):216-221.
    Harris argues that if QALYs are used only 50% of the population will be eligible for survival, whereas if random methods of allocation are used 100% will (...)
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  9.  27
    Troubling Dimensions of Heart Transplantation.M. Shildrick, P. McKeever, S. Abbey, J. Poole & H. Ross - 2009 - Medical Humanities 35 (1):35-38.
    Heart transplantation is now the accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure that is resistant to medical treatment. Families of deceased donors routinely are urged to view (...)the heart as agift of lifethat will enable the donor to live on by extending and sustaining the life of a stranger. In contrast, heart recipients are encouraged to view the organ mechanisticallyas a new pump that was rendered a spare, reusable part when a generous stranger died. Psychosocial and psychoanalytic research, anecdotal evidence and first-person accounts indicate that after transplant, many recipients experience unexpected changes or distress that cannot be understood adequately using biomedical explanatory models alone. In this paper it is argued that phenomenological philosophy offers a promising way to frame an ongoing empirical study that asks recipients to reflect on what it is like to incorporate the heart of another person. Merleau-Ponty and others have posited that any change to the body inevitably transforms the self. Hence, it is argued in this paper that replacing failing hearts with functioning hearts from deceased persons must be considered much more than a complex technical procedure. Acknowledging the disturbances to embodiment and personal identity associated with transplantation may explain adverse outcomes that heretofore have been inexplicable. Ultimately, a phenomenological understanding could lead to improvements in the consent process, preoperative teaching and follow-up care. (shrink)
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  10.  71
    Bentham and Blackstone: A Lifetime's Dialectic*: J. H. Burns.J. H. Burns - 1989 - Utilitas 1 (1):22-40.
    The full range of Bentham's engagement with Blackstone's view of law is beyond the scope of a single article. Yet it is important to recognize at (...) the outset, even in a more restricted enquiry into the matter, that the engagement, begun when Bentham, not quite sixteen years of age, started to attend Blackstone's Oxford lectures, was indeed a lifelong affair. Whatever Bentham had in mind when, at the age of eighty, in 1828, he began to write a work entitledA familar view of Blackstone: or say Blackstone familiarized’, the manuscripts at least suffice to prove thatOur Authorwas still in the forefront of his mind at that octogenarian but still indefatigably active stage of his career. Every aspect of Bentham's multifarious intellectual activity over the intervening decades had been touched in some measure by his response to Blackstone's ideas. It still seems true to say what was said a dozen years ago: It would be an exaggeration to say that Bentham elaborated his own conception of law by way of a constant and conscious dialectic with the views of Blackstone. But it would be an exaggeration for which the evidence would afford some excuse. (shrink)
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  11.  38
    Der Logische Aufbau von Leibniz' Metaphysik.J. E. H. Smith - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:29-34.
    Upon mention of the logical structure of anything in the title of a book, many of us will, no doubt, recall a certain strain of philosophy of (...)
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  12.  9
    Der logische Aufbau von LeibnizMetaphysik.J. E. H. Smith - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:29-34.
    Upon mention of the logical structure of anything in the title of a book, many of us will, no doubt, recall a certain strain of philosophy of (...)
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  13.  7
    Der Logische Aufbau von LeibnizMetaphysik[REVIEW]J. E. H. Smith - 2001 - The Leibniz Review 11:29-34.
    Upon mention of the logical structure of anything in the title of a book, many of us will, no doubt, recall a certain strain of philosophy of (...)
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  14.  45
    The Quest for Optimality: A Positive Heuristic of Science?Paul J. H. Schoemaker - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):205-215.
    This paper examines the strengths and weaknesses of one of science's most pervasive and flexible metaprinciples;optimalityis used to explain utility maximization in economics, least effort principles (...) in physics, entropy in chemistry, and survival of the fittest in biology. Fermat's principle of least time involves both teleological and causal considerations, two distinct modes of explanation resting on poorly understood psychological primitives. The rationality heuristic in economics provides an example from social science of the potential biases arising from the extreme flexibility of optimality considerations, including selective search for confirming vidence, ex post rationalization, and the confusion of prediction with explanation. Commentators are asked to reflect on the extent to which optimality is an organizing principle of nature, a set of relatively unconnected techniques of science, a normative principle for rational choice and social organization, a metaphysical way of looking at the world, or something else still. (shrink)
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  15.  12
    The Relation Between Religiosity Dimensions and Support for Interreligious Conflict in Indonesia.Tery Setiawan, Edwin B. P. De Jong, Peer L. H. Scheepers & Carl J. A. Sterkens - 2020 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 42 (2):244-261.
    In this study, we explain differences in support for interreligious lawful and violent protests against the religious outgroup. Combining religiosity and social identity approaches, we take three (...)
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  16.  15
    Defining Reasonable Patient Standard and Preference for Shared Decision Making Among Patients Undergoing Anaesthesia in Singapore.J. L. J. Yek, A. K. Y. Lee, J. A. D. Tan, G. Y. Lin, T. Thamotharampillai & H. R. Abdullah - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):6.
    A cross-sectional study to ascertain what the Singapore population would regard as material risk in the anaesthesia consent-taking process and identify demographic factors that predict patient (...) preferences in medical decision-making to tailor a more patient-centered informed consent. A survey was performed involving patients 21 years old and above who attended the pre-operative evaluation clinic over a 1-month period in Singapore General Hospital. Questionnaires were administered to assess patientsperception of material risks, by trained interviewers. Patientsdemographics were obtained. MannWhitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance was used. Statistical significance was taken at p < 0.05. Four hundred fourteen patients were eligible of which 26 refused to participate and 24 were excluded due to language barrier. 364 patients were recruited. A higher level of education, being employed and younger age group are factors identified in patients who wanted greater participation in medical decisions. Gender, marital status, type of surgery, and previous surgical history did not affect their level of participation. The complications most patients knew about were Nausea, Drowsiness and Surgical Wound Pain. Patients ranked Heart Attack, Death and Stroke as the most significant risks that they wanted to be informed about in greater detail. Most patients wanted to make a joint decision with the anaesthetist, instead of letting the doctor decide or deciding for themselves. Discussion with the anaesthetist is the preferred medium of communication compared to reading a pamphlet or watching a video. Age and educational level can influence medical decision-making. Despite the digital age, most patients still prefer a clinic consult instead of audio-visual multimedia for pre-operative anaesthetic counselling. The local population appears to place greater importance on rare but serious complications compared to common complications. This illustrates the need to contextualize information provided during informed consent to strengthen the doctor-patient relationship. (shrink)
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  17. The Death of the Past.J. H. Plumb - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In this book, J.H. Plumb investigates the way that humankind has, since the beginning of recorded time, molded the past to give sanction to their institutions (...)of government, their social structure and morality. The past has also been called upon to explain the nature of our destiny in order both to strengthen the objectives of society and to reconcile us to our lot. J.H. Plumb questions this sanction of the past, the force that it has on our sense of destiny and its relevance to our own times. This classic text is now reissued with a new introduction by Niall Ferguson, placing it within a contemporary context, and with a new foreword by the eminent historian Simon Schama, a former student of J.H.Plumb himself. (shrink)
     
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  18.  18
    The Buddhist Way of Life[REVIEW]J. H. P. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):348-348.
    This book is an explication of a Westerner's understanding of Buddhism. Though the section headings, "Basic Buddhism," "Deeper Truths of Buddhism," and "Zen Buddhism" might suggest (...)that the author is seeking to explain Buddhism on its own grounds, the author has not intended such. He is seeking to make Buddhism available to Westerners through explaining his own acceptance of the Buddhist way. Thus his book explains no particular school within Buddhism and is not very helpful as a key to Buddhism as it is and was in Asia. Rather it is the culmination of a life's study of the subject and a personal confession of the author's own beliefs. The book is interspersed with ten poems written by the author called "Suffering," "Deck Chair, Brighton," "When I am Dead," "Youth in Age," "We Live in Boxes," "In Search of Nothing," "Rootless Thought," "Beyond," "Jijimuge," and "The Void is Full." The book is best suited for those whose interest in Buddhism is very light and who would prefer to read about a westerner's Buddhism.--P. J. H. (shrink)
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  19. Moral Rights and Animals.H. J. McCloskey - 1979 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 22 (1-4):23 – 54.
    In Section I, the purely conceptual issue as to whether animals other than human beings, all or some, may possess rights is examined. This is approached via (...)
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  20.  37
    The Humanising Power of Medical History: Responses to Biomedicine in the 20th Century United States.J. H. Warner - 2011 - Medical Humanities 37 (2):91-96.
    Most American historians of medicine today would be very hesitant about any claim that medical history humanises doctors, medical students or the larger health care enterprise. Yet, (...)
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  21.  41
    Ethics, Risk and Benefits Associated with Different Applications of Nanotechnology: a Comparison of Expert and Consumer Perceptions of Drivers of Societal Acceptance.L. J. Frewer, A. R. H. Fischer & N. Gupta - 2015 - NanoEthics 9 (2):93-108.
    Examining those risk and benefit perceptions utilised in the formation of attitudes and opinions about emerging technologies such as nanotechnology can be useful for both industry and (...)
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  22.  52
    Informed Consent in Direct-to-Consumer Personal Genome Testing: The Outline of A Model Between Specific and Generic Consent.Eline M. Bunnik, A. Cecile J. W. Janssens & Maartje H. N. Schermer - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):343-351.
    Broad genome-wide testing is increasingly finding its way to the public through the online direct-to-consumer marketing of so-called personal genome tests. Personal genome tests (...)estimate genetic susceptibilities to multiple diseases and other phenotypic traits simultaneously. Providers commonly make use of Terms of Service agreements rather than informed consent procedures. However, to protect consumers from the potential physical, psychological and social harms associated with personal genome testing and to promote autonomous decision-making with regard to the testing offer, we argue that current practices of information provision are insufficient and that there is a placeand a needfor informed consent in personal genome testing, also when it is offered commercially. The increasing quantity, complexity and diversity of most testing offers, however, pose challenges for information provision and informed consent. Both specific and generic models for informed consent fail to meet its moral aims when applied to personal genome testing. Consumers should be enabled to know the limitations, risks and implications of personal genome testing and should be given control over the genetic information they do or do not wish to obtain. We present the outline of a new model for informed consent which can meet both the norm of providing sufficient information and the norm of providing understandable information. The model can be used for personal genome testing, but will also be applicable to other, future forms of broad genetic testing or screening in commercial and clinical settings. (shrink)
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  23. Reply to Glanzberg, Soames and Weatherson.H. Cappelen & J. Hawthorne - 2011 - Analysis 71 (1):143-156.
    One of Weatherson's main goals is to drive home a methodological point: We shouldn't be looking for deductive arguments for or against relativismwe should (...)instead be evaluating inductive arguments designed to show that either relativism or some alternative offers the best explanation of some data. Our focus in Chapter Two on diagnostics for shared content allegedly encourages the search for deductive arguments and so does more harm than good. We have no methodological slogan of our own to offer. Part of what we were trying to do was to clearly articulate what the relevant issues even are. Often relativism is characterized in a way that is offhand and sloppy. The relativist, we are told, accepts 'disquotational truth' for various kinds of claims but denies that they are 'true simpliciter'. What exactly is going on here? Do the relevant distinctions even make sense? Before engaging in various abductive manoevers we need to get much clearer about what it is that we are trying to argue for and against. That said we are perfectly happy with the kind of inductive enterprise that Weatherson sketches. For our part, we were fully aware (and indeed explicit) that the 'agreement' diagnostic does notdeductivelysettle all of the relevant disputes. A significant part of Chapter Four is dedicated to something in the vicinity of Weatherson's project. Note, indeed, that our diagnostics are even stated using the ideology of 'providing evidence' – hardly the basis for a straightforwardly deductive argument for or against relativism. Finally, though, we should point out that we are not hostile to deductive arguments against relativism. A philosopher's evidence is theory-laden and in part owes itself to epistemic powers that his or her opponents may not acknowledge. In short, their evidence may not always have the hallmarks of 'evidence neutrality' --- evidence that their opponents would recognize as such. We are perfectly open to there being compelling deductive arguments against relativism from such evidence.. (shrink)
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  24.  26
    Mixed-System Brain Dynamics: Neural Memory as a Macroscopic Ordered State[REVIEW]C. I. J. M. Stuart, Y. Takahashi & H. Umezawa - 1979 - Foundations of Physics 9 (3-4):301-327.
    The paper reviews the current situation regarding a new theory of brain dynamics put forward by the authors in an earlier publication. Motivation for the theory is (...)
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  25.  2
    The African Philosophy Reader.P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    Divided into eight sections, each with introductory essays, the selections offer rich and detailed insights into a diverse multinational philosophical landscape. Revealed in this pathbreaking work is (...)
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  26. Philosophy From Africa: a Text with Readings.P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) - 1998 - Johannesburg: International Thomson Publishing ITP.
    From early sage philosophers to Leopold Senghor of Senegal and Steve Biko of South Africa, African thinking has challenged the way we think. As we enter a (...)
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  27.  18
    The Shortest Way to Modernity Is Via the Margins: J.H. Prynnes Later Poetry.Wit Pietrzak - 2012 - Text Matters - a Journal of Literature, Theory and Culture 2 (2):144-154.
    In the essay an attempt is made to investigate the processes of construction and reconstruction of meaning in the later books of the Cambridge poet J.H. (...)Prynne. It has been argued that his poetry disturbs the act of meaning-making in a ceaseless experimental reconnection of words taken from multifarious discourses, ranging from economics to theology. Yet, what appears striking in this poetry is the fact that these lyrics take their force from figurative meaning with which the words are endowed in the process of a poems unfolding. Prynne appears to compose his lyrics by juxtaposing words that in themselves do yield a meaning but together exude an aura of unintelligibility. We may see this process as aiming at the destruction of what might be posited as the centre of signification of the modern language by constantly dispersing the meaning to the fringes of understanding. The poems force the reader to look to the margins of their meaning in the sense that the signification of the entire lyric is an unstable composite of figurative meanings of this lyrics individual words and phrases. To approach this poetry a need arises to read along the lines of what is here termedfleeting assertion”; it is not that Prynnes poems debar centre in favour of, for instance, Derridean freeplay but rather that they seek to ever attempt to erect a centre through the influx from the margins of signification. Therefore they call for strong interpretive assertions without which they veer close to an absurdity of incomprehension; however, those assertions must always be geared to accepting disparate significatory influxes. Indeed, interpretation becomes a desperate chase afterseeing anewwith language but, at the same time, a chase that must a priori come to terms with the fact that this new vision will forever remain in the making. (shrink)
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  28.  23
    The Philosophy of Linguistic Analysis and the Problem of Universals.H. J. McCloskey - 1964 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 24 (3):329-338.
    IT IS ARGUED THAT LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS DOES NOT DEAL WITH\nTHE PROBLEM OF UNIVERSALS IN A SATISFACTORY WAY. THE\nCONTRIBUTIONS OF RYLE, WITTGENSTEIN AND PEARS ARE\nCONSIDERED. IT (...)
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  29. Lockean Provisos and State of Nature Theories.J. H. Bogart - 1985 - Ethics 95 (4):828-836.
    State of nature theories have a long history and play a lively role in contemporary work. Theories of this kind share certain nontrivial commitments. Among these are (...)
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  30.  9
    Aristotle on Mind and the Senses: Proceedings of the Seventh Symposium Aristotlelicum[REVIEW]A. H. D. - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (3):557-558.
    The seventh of the triennial Symposia Aristotelica was devoted to studies of Aristotles two major psychological treatises, the De anima and the Parva naturalia. All of (...)the papers at that conference are presented here in revised form. In addition, the four papers not originally presented in either English or French have been translated into English for this volume. Perhaps the best way to present an initial sense of the range of topics is to list the table of contents: S. Mansion, "Soul and Life in the De anima"; Charles Lefèvre, "Sur le statut de l'ame dans le De anima et les Parva naturalia"; Andreas Graeser, "On Aristotles Framework of Sensibilia"; M. Schofield, "Aristotle on the Imagination"; Enrico Berti, "The Intellection of Indivisibles According to Aristotle De anima 3.6"; David J. Furley, "Self Movers"; J. B. Skemp, "ὀρέξις in De anima 3.10"; G. Verbecke "Doctrine du pneuma et entelechisme chez Aristote"; G. E. R. Lloyd, "The Empirical Basis of the Physiology of the Parva naturalia"; Jurgen Wiesner, "The Unity of the De somno and the Physiological Explanation of Sleep in Aristotle"; and Paul Moraux, "Le De anima dans le tradition grecque: Quelques aspects de l'interpretation du traité, de Theophraste a [[sic]] Themistius." The work concludes with an index of sources, an index of technical terms, and an index of persons and subjects. (shrink)
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  31.  12
    Being Lister: Ethos and Victorian Medical Discourse.J. J. Connor & J. T. H. Connor - 2008 - Medical Humanities 34 (1):3-10.
    Stylistic analysis and rhetorical theory are used in this study to inform our understanding of impediments to the successful uptake of a new medical idea. Through examination (...)
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  32.  44
    Liberty of Expression its Grounds and Limits (I).H. J. McCloskey - 1970 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 13 (1-4):219 – 237.
    The problem posed in this paper is 'Can those interferences with liberty of expression which are necessary and desirable be indicated in some simple, general way, e. (...)g. in terms of some principle or principles of the kinds with which J. S. Mill sought to delimit the interferences with freedom of action?' It is argued that although J. S. Mill sought to defend 'the fullest freedom of expression', he in fact allowed important interferences of kinds which render the formulation of a principle covering them difficult. Further, it is maintained that the important liberal arguments advanced by the great exponents of liberalism are such that they admit as being necessary, legitimate, and desirable, a wide range and variety of interferences, where these interferences are such that they must be determined in the light of the facts in the concrete situation and not on the basis of some general principle. (shrink)
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  33.  28
    Between the Needy and the Greedy: the Quest for a Just and Fair Ethics of Clinical Research.V. Garrafa, J. H. Solbakk, S. Vidal & C. Lorenzo - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):500-504.
    The acceleration of the market globalisation process over the last three decades has internationalised clinical research and influenced both the way in which it is funded and (...)
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  34.  23
    The Legacy of Jean Bodin: Absolutism, Populism or Constitutionalism?J. H. M. Salmon - 1996 - History of Political Thought 17 (4):500-522.
    It is given to few political thinkers to be at once as innovative and as self- contradictory as Jean Bodin. This paper examines the way in which (...)
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  35.  27
    The Natural Emergence of (Bio)Semiosic Phenomena.J. H. van Hateren - 2015 - Biosemiotics 8 (3):403-419.
    Biological organisms appear to have agency, goals, and meaningful behaviour. One possibility is that this is mere appearance, where such properties are not real, but onlyas (...)
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  36.  24
    The Lost Voice: How Libertarianism and Consumerism Obliterate the Need for a Relational Ethics in the National Health Care Service.R. H. J. ter Meulen - 2008 - Christian Bioethics 14 (1):78-94.
    This article analyzes the contribution Christian ethics might be able to make to the ethical debate on policy and caregiving in health and social care in the (...)
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  37.  9
    CELDAan Ontology for the Comprehensive Representation of Cells in Complex Systems.S. Seltmann, H. Stachelscheid, A. Damaschun, L. Jansen, F. Lekschas, J.-F. Fontaine & T. N. Nguyen-Dobinsky - 2013 - BMC Bioinformatics 14.
    BACKGROUND -/- The need for detailed description and modeling of cells drives the continuous generation of large and diverse datasets. Unfortunately, there exists no systematic and comprehensive way (...) to organize these datasets and their information. CELDA (Cell: Expression, Localization, Development, Anatomy) is a novel ontology for the association of primary experimental data and derived knowledge to various types of cells of organisms. -/- RESULTS -/- CELDA is a structure that can help to categorize cell types based on species, anatomical localization, subcellular structures, developmental stages and origin. It targets cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Instead of developing a novel ontology from scratch, we carefully designed CELDA in such a way that existing ontologies were integrated as much as possible, and only minimal extensions were performed to cover those classes and areas not present in any existing model. Currently, ten existing ontologies and models are linked to CELDA through the top-level ontology BioTop. Together with 15.439 newly created classes, CELDA contains more than 196.000 classes and 233.670 relationship axioms. CELDA is primarily used as a representational framework for modeling, analyzing and comparing cells within and across species in CellFinder, a web based data repository on cells (http://cellfinder.org). -/- CONCLUSIONS -/- CELDA can semantically link diverse types of information about cell types. It has been integrated within the research platform CellFinder, where it exemplarily relates cell types from liver and kidney during development on the one hand and anatomical locations in humans on the other, integrating information on all spatial and temporal stages. CELDA is available from the CellFinder website: http://cellfinder.org/about/ontology. (shrink)
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  38.  19
    Intrinsic Estimates of Fitness Affect the Causal Structure of Evolutionary Change.J. H. van Hateren - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):729-746.
    The causal structure of Darwinian evolution by natural selection is investigated. Its basic scheme is reproduction resulting from a feedback loop driven by internal and external causes. (...)
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  39. The African Philosophy Reader: a Text with Readings.P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) - 1998 - London: Routledge.
    Divided into eight sections, each with introductory essays, the selections offer rich and detailed insights into a diverse multinational philosophical landscape. Revealed in this pathbreaking work is (...)
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  40.  87
    Peter Singer and Non-Voluntary 'Euthanasia': Tripping Down the Slippery Slope.Suzanne Uniacke & H. J. Mccloskey - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):203-219.
    This article discusses the nature of euthanasia, and the way in which redevelopment of the concept of euthanasia in some influential recent philosophical writing has led to (...)
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  41.  22
    Limiting Solidarity in the Netherlands: A Two-Tier System on the Way.Ruud H. J. Ter Meulen - 1995 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (6).
    Health care policy in the Netherlands has long been guided by the values of solidarity and equality. As a result of several forces, particularly the scarcity of (...)
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  42.  9
    Analysis of the Level of General Clinical Skills of Physician Assistant Students Using an Objective Structured Clinical Examination.Anneke J. A. H. van Vught, Agatha M. Hettinga, Eddie J. P. G. Denessen, Martin J. T. Gerhardus, Geert A. M. Bouwmans, Geert T. W. J. van den Brink & Cornelis T. Postma - 2015 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (5):971-975.
  43.  43
    Environmental Ethics and the Built Environment.Roger J. H. King - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (2):115-131.
    I defend the view that the design of the built environment should be a proper part of environmental ethics. An environmentally responsible culture should be one in (...)
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  44.  93
    Environmental Ethics and the Case for Hunting.Roger J. H. King - 1991 - Environmental Ethics 13 (1):59-85.
    Hunting is a complex phenomenon. l examine it from four different perspectives-animal liberation, the land ethic, primitivism, and ecofeminism-and find no moral justification for sport hunting (...) in any of them. At the same time, however, I argue that there are theoretical flaws in each of these approaches. Animal liberationists focus too much on the individual animal and ignore the difference between domestic and wild animals. Leopolds land ethic fails to come to terms with the self-domestication of humans. I argue that the holism of the land ethic does not in itself justify hunting as a human act of predation appropriate to the demands of wild biotic communities. Primitivists, such as Paul Shepard and Ortega y Gasset, mistakenly argue that hunting is an essential part of human nature and hence part of a healthy return to a natural way of life. Their argument marginalizes womens relations to nature. Finally, I take seriously the ecofeminist claim that sport hunting is a symptom ofpatriarchys fixation on death and violence, although I criticize the more radical claim that women are closer to nature than men. Hunting should be investigated within the broader context of patriarchal social relations between men and women. As an act of violence it constitutes one element of a cultural matrix which is destructive to hoth women and nature. (shrink)
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  45.  13
    A Vida Sem Dobra Nem Réplica: Jean-Luc Marion (J.-L.M.)/Michel Henry (M.H.).Florinda Martins - 2010 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 66 (1):129 - 140.
    A fenomenologia de Michel Henry e Jean-Luc Marion caracteriza-se por uma redefiniçāo da filosofia que nos introduz num universo de conceitos de interesse crescente para as (...) ciências da saúde. A consignaçāo do ego ao corpo dotado de sentidos inverte a ordem lógica dos pnncípios da filosofia de Descartes - ciência; fundaçāo das ciências; metafísica; moral/moral; metafísica; fundaçāo da ciência; ciências - de tal modo que vemos substituídas, em Jean-Luc Marion, as Meditações Metafísicas pelas Meditaçōes Eróticas. É neste processo que Michel Henry se torna, para Jean-Luc Marion, determinante: a declinaçāo do ego à fenomenologia do sentir abre-nos a um novo futuro fenomenològico. Nele a ética revela-se como a verdade da forma de vida daquele que vive num corpo dotado de sentidos. Michel Henry and Jean-Luc Manon's phenomenology has re-defined philosophy and has opened us to an universe of increasingly interest concepts of health sciences. The declination of the ego in a body endowed by senses has reversed the logical order of Descartes's philosophical principles - science, foundation of science, metaphysic, ethics/ethics, into metaphysic, foundation of science and sciences - in such a way that Jean-Luc Marion ended to replace the Metaphysics Meditations by the Erotic Meditations. It is why Michel Henry was so determinant to Jean-Luc Marion: the declination of the ego to the phenomenology of feelings is leading us to a new phenomenological future. In it, ethics reveals to be a real and true way of life of those who live in a body endowed by senses. (shrink)
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  46.  15
    Ideals Regarding a Good Life for Nursing Home Residents with Dementia: Views of Professional Caregivers.Annemarie Kalis, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Johannes J. M. van Delden - 2005 - Nursing Ethics 12 (1):30-42.
    This study investigates what professional caregivers working in nursing homes consider to be a good life for residents suffering from dementia. Ten caregivers were interviewed; special attention (...)
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  47.  58
    Towards a Universal Model of Reading.Ram Frost, Christina Behme, Madeleine El Beveridge, Thomas H. Bak, Jeffrey S. Bowers, Max Coltheart, Stephen Crain, Colin J. Davis, S. Hélène Deacon & Laurie Beth Feldman - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):263.
    In the last decade, reading research has seen a paradigmatic shift. A new wave of computational models of orthographic processing that offer various forms of noisy position (...)
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  48.  13
    Beneficence as a Principle in Human Research.Ian Pieper & Colin J. H. Thomson - 2016 - Monash Bioethics Review 34 (2):117-135.
    Beneficence is one of the four principles that form the basis of the Australian National Statement. The aim of this paper is to explore the philosophical development (...)
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  49.  11
    Knowledge Management and Information Technology in Hendrix Voeders Holland.A. Swinkels & H. J. Veerkamp - 1990 - Knowledge in Society 3 (3):84-90.
    Turbulent and fast moving markets demand flexible organizations capable of accurate and effective handling of knowledge and information. This article describes some essential parts of this knowledge (...)
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  50.  35
    Local and Non-Local Aspects of Quantum Gravity.H.-H. V. Borzeszkowski, B. K. Datta, V. De Sabbata, L. Ronchetti & H.-J. Treder - 2002 - Foundations of Physics 32 (11):1701-1716.
    The analysis of the measurement of gravitational fields leads to the Rosenfeld inequalities. They say that, as an implication of the equivalence of the inertial and passive (...)
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