Results for 'Zachary Herz'

576 found
Order:
  1.  5
    Justice and the Roman Empire - (O.) Hekster, (K.) Verboven (Edd.) The Impact of Justice on the Roman Empire. Proceedings of the Thirteenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Gent, June 21–24, 2017). (Impact of Empire 34.) Pp. VIII + 237, B/W & Colour Ills. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2019. Cased, €121, Us$146. Isbn: 978-90-04-40045-0. [REVIEW]Zachary Herz - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):462-464.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  2
    Precedential Reasoning and Dynastic Self-Fashioning in the Rescripts of Severus Alexander.Zachary Herz - 2020 - História 69 (1):103.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  12
    The Cambridge Companion to Roman Law Ed. By David Johnston.Zachary Herz - 2016 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (3):420-421.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  14
    Kierkegaard and Divine-Command Theory: Replies to Quinn and Evans: R. Zachary Manis.R. Zachary Manis - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):289-307.
    One of the most important recent developments in the discussion of Kierkegaard's ethics is an interpretation defended, in different forms, by Philip Quinn and Stephen Evans. Both argue that a divine-command theory of moral obligation is to be found in Works of Love . Against this view, I argue that, despite significant overlap between DCT and the view of moral obligation found in Works of Love , there is at least one essential difference between the two: the former, but not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5.  27
    Herz, Hans. Dr. med. Energie und s eelische Richtkräfte.H. Herz - 1911 - Kant-Studien 16 (1-3).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  37
    Honorary Authorship in Biomedical Journals: How Common is It and Why Does It Exist?Waleed Al-Herz, Hani Haider, Mahmoud Al-Bahhar & Adnan Sadeq - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (5):346-348.
    Background The number of coauthors in the medical literature has increased over the past 50 years as authorship continues to have important academic, social and financial implications.Aim and method The study aim was to determine the prevalence of honorary authorship in biomedical publications and identify the factors that lead to its existence. An email with a survey link was sent anonymously to 9283 corresponding authors of PubMed articles published within 1 year of contact.Results A completed survey was obtained from 1246 (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  7.  36
    Bodily Communication of Emotion: Evidence for Extrafacial Behavioral Expressions and Available Coding Systems.Zachary Witkower & Jessica L. Tracy - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (2):184-193.
    Although scientists dating back to Darwin have noted the importance of the body in communicating emotion, current research on emotion communication tends to emphasize the face. In this article we review the evidence for bodily expressions of emotions—that is, the handful of emotions that are displayed and recognized from certain bodily behaviors. We also review the previously developed coding systems available for identifying emotions from bodily behaviors. Although no extant coding system provides an exhaustive list of bodily behaviors known to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  30
    The Reformulation Argument: Reining in Gricean Pragmatics.Zachary Miller - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):525-546.
    A semantic theory aims to make predictions that are accurate and comprehensive. Sometimes, though, a semantic theory falls short of this aim, and there is a mismatch between prediction and data. In such cases, defenders of the semantic theory often attempt to rescue it by appealing to Gricean pragmatics. The hope is that we can rescue the theory as long as we can use pragmatics to explain away its predictive failures. This pragmatic rescue strategy is one of the most popular (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  31
    Dysfunction, Disease, and the Limits of Selection.Zachary Ardern - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (1):4-9.
    Paul Griffiths and John Matthewson argue that selected effects play the key role in determining whether a state is pathological. In response, it is argued that a selected effects account faces a number of difficulties in light of modern genomic research. Firstly, a modern history approach to selection is problematic as a basis for assigning function to human traits in light of the small population sizes in the hominin lineage, which imply that selection has played a limited role in shaping (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  8
    Academic Honesty, Linguistic Dishonesty: Analyzing the Readability and Translation of Academic Integrity and Honesty Policies at U.S. Postsecondary Institutions.Zachary W. Taylor & Ibrahim Bicak - 2019 - Journal of Academic Ethics 17 (1):1-15.
    A large body of research has indicated international students in the United States and abroad experience difficulties understanding what academic integrity is and how to avoid academic misconduct, 159–172 2011; Brown & Howell, 2001; Gullifer and Tyson Studies in Higher Education, 39, 1202-1218 2014). While most studies focus on academic misconduct and academic corruption in research ethics, 339-358 2014), this study analyzes the length, English-language readability, and translation of academic integrity policies of 453 four-year U.S. institutions of higher education. Findings (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Mind-Wandering is Unguided Attention: Accounting for the “Purposeful” Wanderer.Zachary Irving - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):547-571.
    Although mind-wandering occupies up to half of our waking thoughts, it is seldom discussed in philosophy. My paper brings these neglected thoughts into focus. I propose that mind-wandering is unguided attention. Guidance in my sense concerns how attention is monitored and regulated as it unfolds over time. Roughly speaking, someone’s attention is guided if she would feel pulled back, were she distracted from her current focus. Because our wandering thoughts drift unchecked from topic to topic, they are unguided. One motivation (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  12. What is an Extended Simple Region?Zachary Goodsell, Michael Duncan & Kristie Miller - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (3):649-659.
    The notion of an extended simple region (henceforth ESR) has recently been marshalled in the service of arguments for a variety of conclusions. Exactly how to understand the idea of extendedness as it applies to simple regions, however, has been largely ignored, or, perhaps better, assumed. In this paper we first (§1) outline what we take to be the standard way that philosophers are thinking about extendedness, namely as an intrinsic property of regions. We then introduce an alternative picture (§2), (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  10
    Evolutionary Models of Leadership.Zachary H. Garfield, Robert L. Hubbard & Edward H. Hagen - 2019 - Human Nature 30 (1):23-58.
    This study tested four theoretical models of leadership with data from the ethnographic record. The first was a game-theoretical model of leadership in collective actions, in which followers prefer and reward a leader who monitors and sanctions free-riders as group size increases. The second was the dominance model, in which dominant leaders threaten followers with physical or social harm. The third, the prestige model, suggests leaders with valued skills and expertise are chosen by followers who strive to emulate them. The (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  89
    Religion and Arguments From Silence.Zachary Milstead - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 10 (3):155-169.
    Arguments from Silence have been used many times in attempts to discredit the foundations of religions. In this project, I demonstrate how one might judge the epistemic value of such arguments. To begin, I lay out for examination a specific argument from silence given by Walter Richard Cassels in his work Supernatural Religion. I then discuss a recently developed Bayesian approach for dealing with arguments from silence. Finally, using Cassels’s work and the work of some of the critics who replied (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  62
    Moral Rationalism and the Normativity of Constitutive Principles.Zachary Bachman - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (1):1-19.
    Recently, Christine Bratu and Mortiz Dittmeyer have argued that Christine Korsgaard’s constitutive project fails to establish the normativity of practical principles because it fails to show why a principle’s being constitutive of a practice shows that one ought to conform to that principle. They argue that in many cases a principle’s being constitutive of a practice has no bearing on whether one ought to conform to it. In this paper I argue that Bratu and Dittmeyer’s argument fails in three important (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16.  10
    The Case Against Ethics Review in the Social Sciences.Zachary M. Schrag - 2011 - Research Ethics 7 (4):120-131.
    For decades, scholars in the social sciences and humanities have questioned the appropriateness and utility of prior review of their research by human subjects' ethics committees. This essay seeks to organize thematically some of their published complaints and to serve as a brief restatement of the major critiques of ethics review. In particular, it argues that 1) ethics committees impose silly restrictions, 2) ethics review is a solution in search of a problem, 3) ethics committees lack expertise, 4) ethics committees (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  17.  22
    Where Exactly is the ‘Real’ in Critical Realism? Plus, a Dewey-James Alternative.Zachary Wehrwein - 2019 - Journal of Critical Realism 18 (3):337-346.
    Volume 18, Issue 3, June 2019, Page 337-346.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  24
    Emotion and Language: Valence and Arousal Affect Word Recognition.Victor Kuperman, Zachary Estes, Marc Brysbaert & Amy Beth Warriner - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (3):1065-1081.
  19.  14
    Freeze or Flee? Negative Stimuli Elicit Selective Responding.Zachary Estes & Michelle Verges - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):557-565.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  20.  27
    Beyond Punishment? A Normative Account of the Collateral Legal Consequences of Conviction.Zachary Hoskins - 2019 - New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    People convicted of crimes are subject to a criminal sentence, but they also face a host of other restrictive legal measures: Some are denied access to jobs, housing, welfare, the vote, or other goods. Some may be deported, may be subjected to continued detention, or may have their criminal records made publicly accessible. These measures are often more burdensome than the formal sentence itself. -/- In Beyond Punishment?, Zachary Hoskins offers a philosophical examination of these burdensome legal measures, called (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  4
    A History of the Arab Peoples.Zachary Lockman & Albert Hourani - 1992 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 112 (2):307.
  22.  4
    Monitoring Uncharted Communities of Crowdsourced Plagiarism.Zachary Dixon & Kelly George - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 19 (2):291-301.
    This paper reports on a study of crowd-sourcing ‘study aid’ web platforms. Students are sharing completed academic coursework through a growing network of ‘study aid’ web platforms like CourseHero.com. These websites facilitate the crowd-sourced exchange of coursework, and effectively support plagiarism. However, virtually no data exists concerning the scope or extent of coursework being shared through these platforms. This paper reports on two experiments to monitor the frequency of coursework from a sample university uploaded onto CourseHero.com. Ultimately, both experiments failed (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23. Sustainability of What? Recognizing the Diverse Values That Sustainable Agriculture Works to Sustain.Zachary Piso, Ian Werkheiser, Samantha Noll & Christina Leshko - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (2):195-214.
    The contours of sustainable systems are defined according to communities’ goals and values. As researchers shift from sustainability-in-the-abstract to sustainability-as-a-concrete-research-challenge, democratic deliberation is essential for ensuring that communities determine what systems ought to be sustained. Discourse analysis of dialogue with Michigan direct marketing farmers suggests eight sustainability values – economic efficiency, community connectedness, stewardship, justice, ecologism, self-reliance, preservationism and health – which informed the practices of these farmers. Whereas common heuristics of sustainability suggest values can be pursued harmoniously, we discuss (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  70
    Ordering Effects, Updating Effects, and the Specter of Global Skepticism.Zachary Horne & Jonathan Livengood - 2017 - Synthese 194 (4):1189-1218.
    One widely-endorsed argument in the experimental philosophy literature maintains that intuitive judgments are unreliable because they are influenced by the order in which thought experiments prompting those judgments are presented. Here, we explicitly state this argument from ordering effects and show that any plausible understanding of the argument leads to an untenable conclusion. First, we show that the normative principle is ambiguous. On one reading of the principle, the empirical observation is well-supported, but the normative principle is false. On the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  25. Explaining the Social Contract.Zachary Ernst - 2001 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):1-24.
    Brian Skyrms has argued that the evolution of the social contract may be explained using the tools of evolutionary game theory. I show in the first half of this paper that the evolutionary game-theoretic models are often highly sensitive to the specific processes that they are intended to simulate. This sensitivity represents an important robustness failure that complicates Skyrms's project. But I go on to make the positive proposal that we may none the less obtain robust results by simulating the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  26. What Fitness Can’T Be.André Ariew & Zachary Ernst - 2009 - Erkenntnis 71 (3):289-301.
    Recently advocates of the propensity interpretation of fitness have turned critics. To accommodate examples from the population genetics literature they conclude that fitness is better defined broadly as a family of propensities rather than the propensity to contribute descendants to some future generation. We argue that the propensity theorists have misunderstood the deeper ramifications of the examples they cite. These examples demonstrate why there are factors outside of propensities that determine fitness. We go on to argue for the more general (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  27.  10
    Integrative Priming Occurs Rapidly and Uncontrollably During Lexical Processing.Zachary Estes & Lara L. Jones - 2009 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 138 (1):112-130.
  28.  30
    Mind‐Wandering: A Philosophical Guide.Zachary C. Irving & Aaron Glasser - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29.  60
    Evil and a Worthwhile Life.Zachary J. Goldberg - 2017 - In Reflections on Ethics and Responsibility: Essays in Honor of Peter A. French. Springer. pp. 145-163.
    The concept of evil plays a central role in many of Peter French’s publications. He defines evil as “a human action that jeopardizes another person’s (or group’s) aspirations to live a worthwhile life (or lives) by the willful infliction of undeserved harm on that person(s)” (French 2011, 61, 95). Inspired by Harry Frankfurt’s work on the importance of what we care about, French argues that “the life a person leads is worthwhile if what he or she really gives a damn (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  30. Mind-Wandering: A Philosophical Guide.Zachary C. Irving & Aaron Glasser - forthcoming - Philosophical Compass.
    Philosophers have long been fascinated by the stream of consciousness––thoughts, images, and bits of inner speech that dance across the inner stage. Yet for centuries, such “mind-wandering” was deemed private and thus resistant to empirical investigation. Recent developments in psychology and neuroscience have reinvigorated scientific interest in the stream of thought, leading some researchers to dub this “the era of the wandering mind”. Despite this flurry of progress, scientists have stressed that mind-wandering research requires firmer philosophical foundations. The time is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. The Philosophy of Mind Wandering.Irving Zachary & Thompson Evan - forthcoming - In Fox Kieran & Christoff Kalina (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Spontaneous Thought and Creativity. Oxford University Press.
    Our paper serves as an introduction to a budding field: the philosophy of mind-wandering. We begin with a philosophical critique of the standard psychological definitions of mind-wandering as task-unrelated or stimulus-independent. Although these definitions have helped bring mind-wandering research onto centre stage in psychology and cognitive neuroscience, they have substantial limitations that researchers must overcome to move forward. Specifically, the standard definitions do not account for (i) the dynamics of mind wandering, (ii) task-unrelated thought that does not qualify as mind-wandering, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  34
    Narrative Ethics.Adam Zachary Newton - 1995 - Harvard University Press.
    An original work of theory as well as a deft critical performance, Narrative Ethics also stakes a claim for itself as moral inquiry.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  33.  31
    Attention Norms in Siegel’s The Rationality of Perception.Zachary C. Irving - 2019 - Ratio 32 (1):84-91.
    Can we be responsible for our attention? Can attention be epistemically good or bad? Siegel tackles these under‐explored questions in “Selection Effects”, a pathbreaking chapter of The Rationality of Perception. In this chapter, Siegel develops one of the first philosophical accounts of attention norms. Her account is inferential: patterns of attention are often controlled by inferences and therefore subject to rational epistemic norms that govern any other form of inference. Although Siegel’s account is explanatorily powerful, it cannot capture a core (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  32
    A Single Counterexample Leads to Moral Belief Revision.Zachary Horne, Derek Powell & John Hummel - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (8):1950-1964.
    What kind of evidence will lead people to revise their moral beliefs? Moral beliefs are often strongly held convictions, and existing research has shown that morality is rooted in emotion and socialization rather than deliberative reasoning. In addition, more general issues—such as confirmation bias—further impede coherent belief revision. Here, we explored a unique means for inducing belief revision. In two experiments, participants considered a moral dilemma in which an overwhelming majority of people judged that it was inappropriate to take action (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  35.  7
    Ambivalent Economizations: The Case of Value Added Modeling in Teacher Evaluation.Zachary Griffen & Aaron Panofsky - 2021 - Theory and Society 50 (3):515-539.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Fair Play, Political Obligation, and Punishment.Zachary Hoskins - 2011 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):53-71.
    This paper attempts to establish that, and explain why, the practice of punishing offenders is in principle morally permissible. My account is a nonstandard version of the fair play view, according to which punishment 's permissibility derives from reciprocal obligations shared by members of a political community, understood as a mutually beneficial, cooperative venture. Most fair play views portray punishment as an appropriate means of removing the unfair advantage an offender gains relative to law-abiding members of the community. Such views (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  37.  28
    Two Steps to Three Choices: A New Approach to Mandated Choice.Susan E. Herz - 1999 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):340-347.
    Approximately 62,000 people in this country await organ transplants. Ten years ago the waiting list numbered 16,000. The line gets longer every day. Up to 30% of those waiting in line will die waiting. We face a chronic shortage of organs. While demand for organs steadily increases, the number of cadaveric organ donors remains relatively constant: approximately 4,000 in 1988, and approximately 5,500 in 1997. In response to this environment of scarcity, policymakers have considered initiatives in a number of domains.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  38.  18
    Max Scheler.Zachary Davis - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39.  17
    Integration, Values, and Well-Ordered Interdisciplinary Science.Zachary Piso - 2016 - The Pluralist 11 (1):49-57.
    I want to begin by sharing an experience working alongside a team of scientists dedicated to studying coastal fog. Two years ago, experts in coastal ecology, meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and geography recognized the need to initiate conversation between the diverse disciplines that investigate fog. Although fog had long received attention from myriad sciences, coastal fog was yet to receive the sustained investigation that these scientists believed it warranted. Coastal fog is a strong candidate for such investigation; not only is fog (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40.  23
    Political Realism and Political Idealism.George H. Sabine & John H. Herz - 1952 - Philosophical Review 61 (2):233.
  41.  22
    Characters and Fixed-Points in Provability Logic.Zachary Gleit & Warren Goldfarb - 1989 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 31 (1):26-36.
  42.  84
    Ex‐Offender Restrictions.Zachary Hoskins - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (1):33-48.
    Individuals convicted of crimes are often subject to numerous restrictions — on housing, employment, the vote, public assistance, and other goods — well after they have completed their sentences, and in some cases permanently. The question of whether — and if so, when — ex-offender restrictions are morally permissible has received surprisingly little philosophical scrutiny. This article first examines the significance of completing punishment, of paying one's debt to society, and contends that when offenders' debts are paid, they should be (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  43.  4
    The Testing Effect Under Divided Attention: Educational Application.Zachary L. Buchin & Neil W. Mulligan - 2019 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 25 (4):558-575.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  51
    Exercising Quality Control in Interdisciplinary Education: Toward an Epistemologically Responsible Approach.Zachary Stein, Michael Connell & Howard Gardner - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):401-414.
    This article argues that certain philosophically devised quality control parameters should guide approaches to interdisciplinary education. We sketch the kind of reflections we think are necessary in order to produce epistemologically responsible curricula. We suggest that the two overarching epistemic dimensions of levels of analysis and basic viewpoints go a long way towards clarifying the structure of interdisciplinary validity claims. Through a discussion of how best to teach basic ideas about numeracy in Mind, Brain, and Education, we discuss what it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45.  78
    Emotion and Memory: A Recognition Advantage for Positive and Negative Words Independent of Arousal.James S. Adelman & Zachary Estes - 2013 - Cognition 129 (3):530-535.
  46.  46
    Spinozistic Expression.Zachary Micah Gartenberg - 2017 - Philosophers' Imprint 17.
    I investigate the meaning and significance of Spinoza’s elusive concept of “expression”. I do so by situating expression among his canonical relations of conception, causation, and inherence. I argue that, for Spinoza, expression necessarily corresponds to what is sufficient for conception, but implies neither causation nor inherence. This correspondence with sufficient conditions on conception and the pulling apart of expression from causation and inherence has important consequences for our grasp of the interconnections among Spinoza’s key metaphysical relations. But it also (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  12
    Science and the Common Good: Indefinite, Non-Reviewable Mandatory Detention of Asylum Seekers and the Research Imperative.Zachary Steel & Derrick Silove - 2004 - Monash Bioethics Review 23 (4):93-103.
    Despite a strong historical record of resettling and providing care for refugee populations, the Australian Federal Government has increasingly implemented harsh and restrictive policies regarding the treatment and management of asylum seekers. Most controversial of these has been the mandatory detention of asylum seekers, a policy applied indiscriminately and without discretion where individual cases have not been subject to judicial review or time constraints. From the outset health professionals have raised concerns about the possible adverse mental health impacts of prolonged (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  48.  71
    ''Punishment, Contempt, and the Prospect of Moral Reform''.Zachary Hoskins - 2013 - Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (1):1-18.
    This paper objects to certain forms of punishments, such as supermax confinement, on grounds that they are inappropriately contemptuous. Building on discussions in Kant and elsewhere, I flesh out what I take to be salient features of contempt, features that make contempt especially troubling as a form of moral regard and treatment. As problematic as contempt may be in the interpersonal context, I contend that it is especially troubling when a person is treated contemptuously by her political community’s institutions -- (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  49. Ethical Issues in Educational Neuroscience: Raising Children in a Brave New World.Zachary Stein, Bruno Della Chiesa, Christina Hinton & Kurt W. Fischer - 2011 - In Judy Illes & Barbara J. Sahakian (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  61
    Belief Updating in Moral Dilemmas.Zachary Horne, Derek Powell & Joseph Spino - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):705-714.
    Moral psychologists have shown that people’s past moral experiences can affect their subsequent moral decisions. One prominent finding in this line of research is that when people make a judgment about the Trolley dilemma after considering the Footbridge dilemma, they are significantly less likely to decide it is acceptable to redirect a train to save five people. Additionally, this ordering effect is asymmetrical, as making a judgment about the Trolley dilemma has little to no effect on people’s judgments about the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 576