Results for 'Robert E. Allinson'

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  1. On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference.Robert E. Allinson - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
    The common understanding of Chuang-Tzu as one of the earliest deconstructionists is only half true. This article sets out to challenge conventional characterizations of Chuang-Tzu by adding the important caveat that not only is he a philosophical deconstructionist but that his writings also reveal a non-relativistic, transcendental basis to understanding. The road to such understanding, as argued by this author, can be found in Chuang-Tzu’s emphasis on the illusory or dream-like nature of the self and, by extension, the subject-object dichotomy (...)
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  2.  69
    The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion.Robert E. Allinson - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
  3.  19
    Liu Shu-Hsien and Robert E. Allinson, Eds. "Harmony and Strife: Contemporary Perspectives, East and West". [REVIEW]Charles Wei-Hsun Fu - 1991 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):123.
  4.  57
    Having Your Cake and Eating It, Too: Evaluation and Trans-Evaluation in Chuang Tzu and Nietzsche.Robert E. Allinson - 1986 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (4):429-443.
  5. Complementarity as a Model for East-West Integrative Philosophy.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):505-517.
    The discovery of a letter in the Niels Bohr archives written by Bohr to a Danish schoolteacher in which he reveals his early knowledge of the Daodejing led the present author on a search to unveil the influence of the philosophy of Yin-Yang on Bohr's famed complementarity principle in Western physics. This paper recounts interviews with his son, Hans, who recalls Bohr reading a translated copy of Laozi, as well as Hanna Rosental, close friend and associate who also confirms the (...)
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  6. Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots.Robert E. Allinson (ed.) - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
    These essays represent an attempt to understand the Chinese mind through its philosophy. The first volume of its kind, the collection demonstrates how Chinese philosophy can be understood in light of techniques and categories taken from Western philosophy. Eight philosophers, each of whom is a recognized authority in Western philosophy as well as in some area of Chinese philosophy, contribute chapters from perspectives that indicate the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking in categories adapted from Western philosophy. The book (...)
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  7. I and Tao: Martin Buber's Encounter with Chuang Tzu.Robert E. Allinson & Jonathan R. Herman - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (3):529.
    This review confirms Herman’s work as a praiseworthy contribution to East-West and comparative philosophical literature. Due credit is given to Herman for providing English readers with access to Buber’s commentary on, a personal translation of, the Chuang-Tzu; Herman’s insight into the later influence of I and Thou on Buber’s understanding of Chuang-Tzu and Taoism is also appropriately commended. In latter half of this review, constructive criticisms of Herman’s work are put forward, such as formatting inconsistencies, a tendency toward verbosity and (...)
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  8. Snakes and Dragons, Rat’s Liver and Fly’s Leg: The Butterfly Dream Revisited.Robert E. Allinson - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (4):513-520.
    The Zhuangzi begins with Peng, a soaring bird transformed from a bounded fish, which is the first metaphor that points beyond limited standpoints to a higher point of view. The transformation is one-way and symbolizes that there is a higher viewpoint to attain which affords mental freedom and the clarity and scope of great vision. Under the alternate thesis of constant transformation, values and understandings must ceaselessly transform and collapse. All cyclical transformations must collapse into skeptical relativism and confusion. But (...)
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  9. The “Cog in the Machine” Manifesto: The Banality and the Inevitability of Evil.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):743-756.
    As a response to Diane Vaughan’s controversial work on the NASA Challenger Disaster, this article opposes the conclusion that NASA’s decision to launch the space shuttle was an inevitable outcome of techno-bureaucratic culture and risky technology. Instead, the argument developed in this article is that NASA did not prioritize safety, both in their selection of shuttle-parts and their decision to launch under sub-optimal weather conditions. This article further suggests that the “mistake” language employed by Vaughan and others is inappropriate insofar (...)
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  10.  45
    A Logical Reconstruction of the Butterfly Dream: The Case for Internal Textual Transformation.Robert E. Allinson - 1988 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):319-339.
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  11. On the Question of Relativism in the Chuang-Tzu.Robert E. Allinson - 1989 - Philosophy East and West 39 (1):13-26.
    This article offers a meta-analysis of contemporary approaches aimed at resolving the internal, relativistic-non-relativistic tension within the text of the Chuang-Tzu. In the first section, the four most commonly applied approaches are unpacked and evaluated, ranging from relativistic approaches such as hard relativism and soft relativism, to approaches that acknowledge both relativism and non-relativism, as well as others which acknowledge neither of the two perspectives (relativism and non-relativism). After demonstrating the immanent difficulties these four types of approaches encounter, the latter (...)
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  12.  95
    Moral Values and the Taoist Sage in the Tao de Ching.Robert E. Allinson - 1994 - Asian Philosophy 4 (2):127 – 136.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Tao de Ching regarding moral values and the Taoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Tao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour to (...)
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  13. A Hermeneutic Reconstruction of the Child in the Well Example.Robert E. Allinson - 1992 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 19 (3):297-308.
    This article draws on two Mencian illustrations of human goodness: the example of the child in the well and the metaphor of the continually deforested mountain. By reconstructing Mencius’ two novel ideas within the framework of a phenomenological thought-experiment, this article’s purpose is to explain the validity of this uncommon approach to ethics, an approach which recognizes that subjective participation is necessary to achieve any ethical understanding. It is through this active phenomenological introspection that the individual grasps the goodness of (...)
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  14. The Golden Rule as the Core Value in Confucianism & Christianity: Ethical Similarities and Differences.Robert E. Allinson - 1992 - Asian Philosophy 2 (2):173 – 185.
    One side of this paper is devoted to showing that the Golden Rule, understood as standing for universal love, is centrally characteristic of Confucianism properly understood, rather than graded, familial love. In this respect Confucianism and Christianity are similar. The other side of this paper is devoted to arguing contra 18 centuries of commentators that the negative sentential formulation of the Golden Rule as found in Confucius cannot be converted to an affirmative sentential formulation (as is found in Christianity) without (...)
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  15.  3
    The Confucian Golden Rule: A Negative Formualtion.Robert E. Allinson - 1985 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 12 (3):305-315.
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  16.  37
    Moral Values and the Daoist Sage in the Dao Dejing.Robert E. Allinson - 1996 - In Brian Carr (ed.), Morals and Society in Asian Philosophy. Curzon. pp. 1--156.
    The theme of this paper is that while there are four seemingly contradictory classes of statements in the Dao de Jing regarding moral values and the Daoist sage, these statements can be interpreted to be consistent with each other. There are statements which seemingly state or imply that nothing at all can be said about the Dao; there are statements which seemingly state or imply that all value judgements are relative; there are statements which appear to attribute moral behaviour to (...)
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  17.  2
    A Logical Reconstruction of the Butterfly Dream: The Case for Internal Textual Transformation.Robert E. Allinson - 1988 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):319-339.
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  18.  10
    The “Cog in the Machine” Manifesto: The Banality and the Inevitability of Evil - The Challenger Launch Decision: Risky Technology, Culture and Deviance at NASA Diane Vaughan Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 1996, 575 Pp. [REVIEW]Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (4):743-756.
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  19.  5
    A Metaphysics for the Future.Robert E. Allinson - 2001 - Ashgate.
    This work is intended to serve not only as an expression of a new idea of a philosophy, but as an apologia for philosophy as a legitimate and independent discipline in its own right. It argues that in the 20th century, truth has not been abandoned, but merely modified. The text proposes a return to truth and suggests that it is only after apprehending the truths of consciousness that the philosopher's mirror may become a kaleidoscope through which reality may be (...)
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  20.  28
    The Homogeneity and the Heterogeneity of the Concept of the Good in Plato.Robert E. Allinson - 1982 - Philosophical Inquiry 4 (1):30-39.
  21.  14
    ALLINSON, ROBERT E.(1989) Chuang-Tzu for Spiritual Transformation, Albany, State University of New York. ALLINSON, ROBERT E.(1989) Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots, Oxford, Oxford University Press. ALSTON, AJ (Ed.)(1980-89) Samkara Source Book, Vols. I-VI, London, Shanti Sadan. [REVIEW]Vidhushekhara Bhattacharya & Ray Billington - 1991 - Asian Philosophy 1 (1):105.
  22.  44
    Review of Ibn Rushd , by Dominique Urvoy ; Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, by Deborah L. Black ; Philosophy and Science in the Islamic World, by C. A. Qadir ; Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots, by Robert E. Allinson ; On Justice: An Essay in Jewish Philosophy, by . L. E. Goodman. [REVIEW]Ian Netton, Oliver Leaman & Whalen Lai - 1992 - Asian Philosophy 2 (1):101-113.
  23. The Debate Between Mencius and Hsün-Tzu: Contemporary Applications.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (1):31-49.
    This article takes one of the richest historical debates, that of Hsun-Tzu and Mencius, as the contextual starting-point for the elaboration of human goodness. In support of Mencius, this article develops additional metaphysical and bio-social-evolutionary grounds, both of which parallel each other. The metaphysical analysis suggests that, in the spirit of Spinoza, an entity’s nature must necessarily include the drive toward its preservation. Likewise, the multi-faceted bio-social-evolutionary argument locates the fundamental telos of humanity in the preservation of social ties and (...)
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  24.  1
    Aristotle and Averroes: The Problem of Necessity and Contingency.Robert E. Allinson - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3/4):189-197.
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  25. Anselm's One Argument.Robert E. Allinson - 1993 - Philosophical Inquiry 15 (1/2):16-19.
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  26.  2
    On Chuang Tzu as a Deconstructionist with a Difference.Robert E. Allinson - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):487-500.
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  27. Plato's Forgotten Four Pages of the Seventh Epistole.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1/2):49-61.
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  28.  4
    The Homogeneity and the Heterogeneity of the Concept of the Good in Plato.Robert E. Allinson - 1982 - Philosophical Inquiry 4 (1):30-39.
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  29.  7
    Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots.Robert E. Allinson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (2):411-413.
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  30.  9
    Searle’s Master Insight and the Non-Dual Solution of the Sixth Patriarch: Sorting Through Some Problems of Consciousness.Robert E. Allinson - 2017 - Comparative Philosophy 8 (1).
    The Platform Sutra, which dates back to the seventh century C.E., is one of the classic documents of Chinese philosophy and is the intellectual autobiography of Hui Neng, the Sixth Patriarch of Ch’an Buddhism. In the Platform Sutra, the Sixth Patriarch demonstrates that the spiritual and intellectual problems of consciousness stem from a false adherence to the dualistic standpoint. The Sixth Patriarch utilizes ingenious arguments to demonstrate how one can escape the problems of dualism. An example of a constructive engagement (...)
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  31.  30
    Aristotle and Averroes: The Problem of Necessity and Contingency.Robert E. Allinson - 2003 - Philosophical Inquiry 25 (3-4):189-197.
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  32.  33
    Anselm's One Argument.Robert E. Allinson - 1993 - Philosophical Inquiry 15 (1-2):16-19.
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  33. Ethical Values as Part of the Definition of Business Enterprise and Part of the Internal Structure of the Business Oganization.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (9-10):1015 - 1028.
    The orientation of this paper is that there is no special science of "business ethics" any more than there is one of "medical ethics" or "legal ethics". While there may be issues that arise in medicine or law that require special treatment, the ways of relating to such issues are derived from a basic ethical stance. Once one has evolved such an ethical stance and thus has incorporated a fundamental mode of relating to her or his fellow human beings, the (...)
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  34.  37
    Plato's Forgotten Four Pages of the Seventh Epistole.Robert E. Allinson - 1998 - Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):49-61.
  35.  6
    Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots.David Wong & Robert E. Allinson - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (3):527.
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  36.  4
    Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots.Ninian Smart & Robert E. Allinson - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (2):411.
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  37. Circles Within a Circle: The Condition for the Possibility of Ethical Business Institutions Within a Market System. [REVIEW]Robert Elliott Allinson - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):17-28.
    How can a business institution function as an ethical institution within a wider system if the context of the wider system is inherently unethical? If the primary goal of an institution, no matter how ethical it sets out to be, is to function successfully within a market system, how can it reconcile making a profit and keeping its ethical goals intact? While it has been argued that some ethical businesses do exist, e.g., Johnson and Johnson, the argument I would like (...)
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  38. An Idealistic Reply To The Later Moore.Robert Allinson - 1980 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 7 (3):375.
    This article is a response to the paradoxical nature of Moore's views on sense perception. By arguing that Moore's later stance on the objective world (that there are both mind-dependent and mind-independent features) requires a causal theory of perception, this article suggests that Moore lacks the epistemic justification needed to make assertions about the nature of mind-independent matter. Instead, the idealistic reply proposed in this article is to first dissolve Moore's distinction between mind-dependent and mind-independent features of the world, and (...)
     
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  39. Ecology, the Ascendent Perspective Robert E. Ulanowicz.Robert E. Ulanowicz - 1997
     
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  40. Utilitarianism as a Public Philosophy.Robert E. Goodin - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Utilitarianism, the great reforming philosophy of the nineteenth century, has today acquired the reputation for being a crassly calculating, impersonal philosophy unfit to serve as a guide to moral conduct. Yet what may disqualify utilitarianism as a personal philosophy makes it an eminently suitable guide for public officials in the pursuit of their professional responsibilities. Robert E. Goodin, a philosopher with many books on political theory, public policy and applied ethics to his credit, defends utilitarianism against its critics and (...)
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  41.  1
    An Epistemic Theory of Democracy.Robert E. Goodin & Kai Spiekermann - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the Condorcet Jury Theorem and how its assumptions can be applicable to the real world. It will use the theorem to assess various familiar political practices and alternative institutional arrangements, revealing how best to take advantage of the truth-tracking potential of majoritarian democracy.
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  42. Enfranchising All Affected Interests, and its Alternatives.Robert E. Goodin - 2007 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (1):40–68.
  43.  2
    The Psychology of Consciousness.Robert E. Ornstein - 1972 - Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
  44.  36
    Innovating Democracy: Democratic Theory and Practice After the Deliberative Turn.Robert E. Goodin - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Revisioning macro-democratic processes in light of the processes and promise of micro-deliberation, Innovating Democracy provides an integrated perspective on democratic theory and practice after the deliberative turn.
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  45. What is so Special About Our Fellow Countrymen?Robert E. Goodin - 1988 - Ethics 98 (4):663-686.
  46.  29
    Heroic Measures and False Hopes: Robert E. Goodin.Robert E. Goodin - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 23:17-32.
    The precise application of the term ‘heroic measures’ in the discourse of medicine and medical ethics is somewhat uncertain. What counts and what does not is, at the margins, a perpetually contentious issue. Basically, though, we can say that the term refers to the deployment of unusual technologies or treatment regimes, or of ordinary technologies or treatment regimes beyond their usual limits.
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  47.  87
    Reflective Democracy.Robert E. Goodin - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Democracy used to be seen as a relatively mechanical matter of merely adding up everyone's votes in free and fair elections. That mechanistic model has many virtues, among them allowing democracy to 'track the truth', where purely factual issues are all that is at stake. Political disputes invariably mix facts with values, however, and then it is essential to listen to what people are saying rather than merely note how they are voting. The great challenge is how to implement that (...)
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  48. Benefiting From the Wrongdoing of Others.Robert E. Goodin & Christian Barry - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):363-376.
    Bracket out the wrong of committing a wrong, or conspiring or colluding or conniving with others in their committing one. Suppose you have done none of those things, and you find yourself merely benefiting from a wrong committed wholly by someone else. What, if anything, is wrong with that? What, if any, duties follow from it? If straightforward restitution were possible — if you could just ‘give back’ what you received as a result of the wrongdoing to its rightful owner (...)
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  49.  29
    The Federal Convention and the Formation of the Union of the American States. By Robert E. Brown.Robert E. Brown - 1960 - Ethics 71 (2):139-141.
  50. On the Experience of Time.Robert E. Ornstein - 1969 - Harmondsworth.
    "How do we experience time? What do we use to experience it?In a series of remarkable experiments, Robert Ornstein shows that it is difficult to maintain an “inner clock” explanation of the experience".
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