Results for 'Kevin N. Laland'

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  1.  87
    More on How and Why: Cause and Effect in Biology Revisited.Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, William Hoppitt & Tobias Uller - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):719-745.
    In 1961, Ernst Mayr published a highly influential article on the nature of causation in biology, in which he distinguished between proximate and ultimate causes. Mayr argued that proximate causes (e.g. physiological factors) and ultimate causes (e.g. natural selection) addressed distinct ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions and were not competing alternatives. That distinction retains explanatory value today. However, the adoption of Mayr’s heuristic led to the widespread belief that ontogenetic processes are irrelevant to evolutionary questions, a belief that has (1) hindered (...)
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  2.  40
    Sense and Nonsense: Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Behaviour.Kevin N. Laland & Gillian Brown - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This book asks whether evolution can help us to understand human behaviour and explores diverse evolutionary methods and arguments. It provides a short, readable introduction to the science behind the works of Dawkins, Dennett, Wilson and Pinker. It is widely used in undergraduate courses around the world.
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  3. Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change.Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution of culture, and on (...)
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  4. Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution.Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good match with (...)
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  5.  36
    The Niche Construction Perspective: A Critical Appraisal.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Kevin N. Laland, David M. Shuker, Thomas E. Dickins & Stuart A. West - unknown
    Niche construction refers to the activities of organisms that bring about changes in their environments, many of which are evolutionarily and ecologically consequential. Advocates of niche construction theory (NCT) believe that standard evolutionary theory fails to recognize the full importance of niche construction, and consequently propose a novel view of evolution, in which niche construction and its legacy over time (ecological inheritance) are described as evolutionary processes, equivalent in importance to natural selection. Here, we subject NCT to critical evaluation, in (...)
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  6.  54
    Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis.Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve the ultimate function of calibrating organisms (...)
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  7.  60
    Cultural Niche Construction: An Introduction.Kevin N. Laland & Michael J. O’Brien - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (3):191-202.
  8.  9
    Social Learning Strategies: Bridge-Building Between Fields.Rachel L. Kendal, Neeltje J. Boogert, Luke Rendell, Kevin N. Laland, Mike Webster & Patricia L. Jones - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (7):651-665.
  9.  45
    Ecological Inheritance and Cultural Inheritance: What Are They and How Do They Differ?John Odling-Smee & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (3):220-230.
  10.  46
    Cognitive Culture: Theoretical and Empirical Insights Into Social Learning Strategies.Luke Rendell, Laurel Fogarty, William J. E. Hoppitt, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Mike M. Webster & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):68-76.
  11. Animal Innovation.Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.) - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Many animals will invent new behaviour patterns, adjust established behaviours to a novel context, or respond to stresses in an appropriate and novel manner. This is the first ever book on the topic of 'animal innovation'. Bringing together leading scientific authorities on animal and human innovation, this book will put the topic of animal innovation on the map, and heighten awareness of this developing field.
     
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  12.  55
    Extending the Extended Phenotype.Kevin N. Laland - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (3):313-325.
  13.  53
    Rethinking Adaptation: The Niche-Construction Perspective.Rachel L. Day, Kevin N. Laland & F. John Odling-Smee - 2003 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (1):80-95.
  14.  87
    Conceptual Barriers to Progress Within Evolutionary Biology.Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, Marcus W. Feldman & Jeremy Kendal - 2009 - Foundations of Science 14 (3):195-216.
    In spite of its success, Neo-Darwinism is faced with major conceptual barriers to further progress, deriving directly from its metaphysical foundations. Most importantly, neo-Darwinism fails to recognize a fundamental cause of evolutionary change, “niche construction”. This failure restricts the generality of evolutionary theory, and introduces inaccuracies. It also hinders the integration of evolutionary biology with neighbouring disciplines, including ecosystem ecology, developmental biology, and the human sciences. Ecology is forced to become a divided discipline, developmental biology is stubbornly difficult to reconcile (...)
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  15. Animal Innovation: An Introduction.Kevin N. Laland & Simon M. Reader - 2003 - In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. Oxford University Press.
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  16.  57
    On the Breadth and Significance of Niche Construction: A Reply to Griffiths, Okasha and Sterelny. [REVIEW]Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman - 2005 - Biology and Philosophy 20 (1):37-55.
  17.  44
    More on How and Why: A Response to Commentaries.Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, William Hoppitt & Tobias Uller - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):793-810.
    We are grateful to the commentators for taking the time to respond to our article. Too many interesting and important points have been raised for us to tackle them all in this response, and so in the below we have sought to draw out the major themes. These include problems with both the term ‘ultimate causation’ and the proximate-ultimate causation dichotomy more generally, clarification of the meaning of reciprocal causation, discussion of issues related to the nature of development and phenotypic (...)
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  18.  36
    A Science of Culture: Clarifications and Extensions.Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):366-375.
    We are encouraged that the majority of commentators endorse our evolutionary framework for studying culture, and several suggest extensions. Here we clarify our position, dwelling on misunderstandings and requests for exposition. We reiterate that using evolutionary biology as a model for unifying the social sciences within a single synthetic framework can stimulate a more progressive and rigorous science of culture. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  19.  4
    Evolutionary Accounts of Human Behavioural Diversity Introduction.Gillian R. Brown, Thomas E. Dickins, Rebecca Sear & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 366 (156):313-324.
    Human beings persist in an extraordinary range of ecological settings, in the process exhibiting enormous behavioural diversity, both within and between populations. People vary in their social, mating and parental behaviour and have diverse and elaborate beliefs, traditions, norms and institutions. The aim of this theme issue is to ask whether, and how, evolutionary theory can help us to understand this diversity. In this introductory article, we provide a background to the debate surrounding how best to understand behavioural diversity using (...)
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  20. The Extended Organism: The Physiology of Animal-Built Structures (Review).Kevin N. Laland - 2001 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (2):297-300.
  21.  21
    Group Selection: A Niche Construction Perspective.Kevin N. Laland, F. John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (1-2):1-2.
    Group selection, as advocated by Sober and Wilson, is theoretically plausible, although it remains an open question as to what extent it occurs in nature. If group selection has operated in hominids, it is likely to have selected cultural not genetic variation. A focus on niche construction helps delineate the conditions under which cooperation is favoured. Group selection may favour between-group conflict as well as within-group cooperation.
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  22. Niche Construction, Human Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Psychology.Kevin N. Laland - 2009 - In Robin Dunbar & Louise Barrett (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology. Oxford University Press.
     
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  23.  24
    Gene–Culture Coevolution.Kevin N. Laland - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  24.  44
    Niche Construction Earns its Keep.Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):164-172.
    Our response contains a definition of niche construction, illustrations of how it changes the evolutionary process, and clarifications of our conceptual model. We argue that the introduction of niche construction into evolutionary thinking earns its keep; we illustrate this argument in our discussion of rates of genetic and cultural evolution, memes and phenogenotypes, creativity, the EEA (environment of evolutionary adaptedness), and group selection.
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  25.  23
    Validating Cultural Transmission in Cetaceans.Rachel L. Day, Jeremy R. Kendal & Kevin N. Laland - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):330-331.
    The evidence of high cognitive abilities in cetaceans does not stand up to close scrutiny under the standards established by laboratory researchers. This is likely to lead to a sterile debate between laboratory and field researchers unless fresh ways of taking the debate forward are found. A few suggestions as to how to do this are proposed.
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  26.  16
    Objectivism Should Not Be a Casualty of Innovation's Operationalization.Rachel L. Kendal, Lewis Dean & Kevin N. Laland - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):413-414.
    We agree with Ramsey et al. regarding the need for new methods and concepts in the study of innovation, and welcome their initiative, but are concerned that their operationalization is over-reliant on subjective judgements.
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  27.  16
    Extending the Behavioral Sciences Framework: Clarification of Methods, Predictions, and Concepts.Alex Mesoudi & Kevin N. Laland - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):36-37.
    We applaud Gintis's attempt to provide an evolutionary-based framework for the behavioral sciences, and note a number of similarities with our own recent cultural evolutionary structure for the social sciences. Gintis's proposal would be further strengthened by a greater emphasis on additional methods to evolutionary game theory, clearer empirical predictions, and a broader consideration of cultural transmission. (Published Online April 27 2007).
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  28. Experimental Studies of Innovation in the Guppy.Kevin N. Laland & Yfke Van Bergen - 2003 - In Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland (eds.), Animal Innovation. Oxford University Press.
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  29.  29
    Is Necessity the Mother of Innovation?Animal Innovation, Edited by Simon M. Reader and Kevin N. Laland. Oxford University Press, 2003. £50.00 /£19.00 . ISBN 0 19 852621 0/ 0 19 852622 9. [REVIEW]Nicola S. Clayton - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):98-99.
  30. Simon M. Reader and Kevin N. Laland, Animal Innovation.S. J. Shettleworth - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (2):203.
     
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  31. Evolutionary Causation: Biological and Philosophical Reflections.Tobias Uller & Kevin Laland (eds.) - forthcoming
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  32. Thirteen Pages on Intellectual Property, with Special Reference to a Doubtful Doctrine of J.S. Mill [in His Principles of Political Economy] by One of His Pupils [Signing Himself N.N.]. [REVIEW]N. N. & John Stuart Mill - 1876
     
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  33.  18
    Theological Interpretation of the New Testament Edited by Kevin J. Vanhoozer with Assistance From Daniel J. Treier and N.T. Wright. [REVIEW]Bruno Clifton - 2010 - New Blackfriars 91 (1033):345-347.
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  34.  17
    Kevin J. Wanner, Snorri Sturluson and the “Edda”: The Conversion of Cultural Capital in Medieval Scandinavia. Toronto; Buffalo, N.Y.; and London: University of Toronto Press, 2008. Pp. X, 257; 2 Black-and-White Figures. $70. [REVIEW]Kirsten Wolf - 2010 - Speculum 85 (2):478-479.
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  35.  8
    Dáithí Ó hÓgáin, The Celts: A History. Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 2002. Paper. Pp. Ix, 297 Plus 18 Black-and-White Plates; 6 Maps. $29.95.Bernhard Maier, The Celts: A History From Earliest Times to the Present. Trans. Kevin Windle. Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press, 2003. Pp. Ix, 310; 6 Maps. $50 ; $23 . First Published in 2000 Under the Title Die Kelten by C. H. Beck, Munich.Michael Richter - 2004 - Speculum 79 (2):535-536.
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  36. Sense and Nonsense: Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Behaviour.Kevin N. Laland, Gillian R. Brown, Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Behaviour, Kevin Laland & Gillian Brown & Kevin Laland and Gillian Brown - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Can evolutionary theory really help us to understand human behaviour? Sense and Nonsense provides an exciting and readable introduction to evolutionary theory. Including profiles of the major protagonists, the book provides the first balanced account of evolutionary theory, and all its faults. The result, is a highly accessible and fascinating account of some of the fierce debates in the scientific world.
     
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  37.  28
    David N. Weisstub and Guillermo Diaz Pintos, Eds, Autonomy and Human Rights in Health Care. International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine, Vol. 36. [REVIEW]Kevin Wm Wildes - 2011 - Human Rights Review 12 (1):143-144.
  38.  6
    Monsignor John Joseph N: Academic, War Chaplain, Parish Priest.Damian John Gleeson - 2018 - The Australasian Catholic Record 95 (1):51.
    Gleeson, Damian John In 1924, after a hiatus of a decade, the Australasian Catholic Record was re-established under the driving force of Monsignor John Joseph Nevin, the then vice-president of St Patrick's College, Manly. Mgr Nevin was ACR's principal editor up until 1937 and with the exception of a trip to Ireland and Europe in 1927, he contributed articles and answered questions on topics ranging across canon law, marriage, and moral theology in virtually every quarterly issue of ACR for more (...)
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  39.  13
    Andy Orchard, Pride and Prodigies: Studies in the Monsters of the “Beowulf” -Manuscript. Woodbridge, Suffolk; and Rochester, N.Y.: Boydell and Brewer, 1995. Pp. Viii, 352; Tables. $71.Kevin Kiernan - 1998 - Speculum 73 (3):879-881.
  40.  11
    „[A]n der Front des Kampfes um den Menschen selbst“. Anthropogenetik und Anthropotechnik im sowjetischen Diskurs der 1920er Jahre.Kevin Liggieri - 2016 - Berichte Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte 39 (2):165-184.
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  41.  29
    Reviews: A Science of Generic Design: Managing Complexity Through Systems Design, John N. Warfield. [REVIEW]Kevin Dooley - 1999 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (2):190-192.
  42.  7
    Zvi Artstein. Mathematics and the Real World: The Remarkable Role of Evolution in the Making of Mathematics. Translated by Alan Hercberg. 426 Pp., Illus., Figs., Tables, Bibl., Index. Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books, 2014. $26. [REVIEW]Kevin Kuhl - 2015 - Isis 106 (4):889-890.
  43.  12
    Review of Bernard N. Schumacher (Ed.), A Cosmopolitan Hermit: Modernity and Tradition in the Philosophy of Josef Pieper[REVIEW]Kevin White - 2010 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (2).
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  44.  3
    Whither Utility and Knowledgeability? Response to N. Stehr "Knowledge, Markets and Biotechnology".Serra A. Tinic & Kevin D. Haggerty - 2004 - Social Epistemology 18 (4):357 – 363.
    This response raises two critical questions about Nico Stehr's article 'Knowledge, Markets and Biotechnology.' First, it examines his claim that in a 'knowledge society' consumers now base their decisions about purchases on more intangible criteria than a product's utility. We demonstrate that this is not unique to a 'knowledge society.' For more than a century Western consumers have been enmeshed in markets where advertisers aim to fashion consumer desires for products by employing strategies that appeal to anything but a product's (...)
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  45. A Cognitive Neuroscience Framework for Understanding Causal Reasoning and the Law.Jonathan A. Fugelsang & Kevin N. Dunbar - 2006 - In Semir Zeki & Oliver Goodenough (eds.), Law and the Brain. Oxford University Press. pp. 157--166.
  46. Social Effects of Oxytocin in Humans: Context and Person Matter.Jennifer A. Bartz, Jamil Zaki, Niall Bolger & Kevin N. Ochsner - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (7):301-309.
  47.  47
    Born to Choose: The Origins and Value of the Need for Control.Lauren A. Leotti, Sheena S. Iyengar & Kevin N. Ochsner - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):457-463.
  48.  9
    Are Affective Events Richly Recollected or Simply Familiar? The Experience and Process of Recognizing Feelings Past.Kevin N. Ochsner - 2000 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 129 (2):242-261.
  49.  23
    The Social Regulation of Emotion: An Integrative, Cross-Disciplinary Model.Crystal Reeck, Daniel R. Ames & Kevin N. Ochsner - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (1):47-63.
  50.  38
    Born to Choose: The Origins and Value of the Need for Control.Kevin N. Ochsner Lauren A. Leotti, Sheena S. Iyengar - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):457.
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