Results for 'Kathryn Phillips'

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  1. Does an Adequate Physical Theory Demand a Primitive Ontology?Alyssa Ney & Kathryn Phillips - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (3):454-474.
  2.  13
    10. Referees for Philosophy of Science Referees for Philosophy of Science (Pp. 479-482).Justin Garson, Yasha Rohwer, Collin Rice, Matteo Colombo, Peter Brössel, Davide Rizza, Simon M. Huttegger, Richard Healey, Alyssa Ney & Kathryn Phillips - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (3):334-355.
  3.  5
    Reframing Recruitment: Evaluating Framing in Authorization for Research Contact Programs.Candace D. Speight, Charlie Gregor, Yi-An Ko, Stephanie A. Kraft, Andrea R. Mitchell, Nyiramugisha K. Niyibizi, Bradley G. Phillips, Kathryn M. Porter, Seema K. Shah, Jeremy Sugarman, Benjamin S. Wilfond & Neal W. Dickert - 2021 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 12 (3):206-213.
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  4.  37
    Primary Care for Tinnitus: Practice and Opinion Among GPs in England.Suliman K. El-Shunnar, Derek J. Hoare, Sandra Smith, Phillip E. Gander, Sujin Kang, Kathryn Fackrell & Deborah A. Hall - 2011 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (4):684-692.
  5.  6
    Deep Disagreement and Patience as an Argumentative Virtue.Kathryn Phillips - 2021 - Informal Logic 41 (1):107-130.
    During a year when there is much tumult around the world and in the United States in particular, it might be surprising to encounter a paper about patience and argumentation. In this paper, I explore the notion of deep disagreement, with an eye to moral and political contexts in particular, in order to motivate the idea that patience is an argumentative virtue that we ought to cultivate. This is particularly so because of the extended nature of argumentation and the slow (...)
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  6.  8
    Kathryn Warner with a Foreword by Ian Mortimer, Edward II: The Unconventional King. Stroud, UK: Amberley Publishing, 2014. Pp. 319; 33 Color Plates. £20. ISBN: 978-1-4456-4120-1. [REVIEW]Seymour Phillips - 2016 - Speculum 91 (2):569-571.
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  7. Geoffrey Chaucer, Chaucer's Dream Poetry, Ed. Helen Phillips and Nick Havely.(Longman Annotated Texts.) London and New York: Longman, 1997. Pp. Xiv, 438.£ 48 (Cloth);€ 17.99 (Paper). [REVIEW]Kathryn L. Lynch - 2001 - Speculum 76 (2):410-412.
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  8.  6
    Brutus: The Noble Conspirator by Kathryn Tempest.Darryl Phillips - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 112 (2):115-116.
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  9.  16
    Real-Time Sampling of Reasons for Hedonic Food Consumption: Further Validation of the Palatable Eating Motives Scale.Mary M. Boggiano, Lowell E. Wenger, Bulent Turan, Mindy M. Tatum, Maria D. Sylvester, Phillip R. Morgan, Kathryn E. Morse & Emilee E. Burgess - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  10.  65
    Moral Passages: Toward a Collectivist Moral Theory.Kathryn Pyne Addelson - 1994 - Routledge.
    In Moral Passages, Kathryn Pyne Addelson presents an original moral theory suited for contemporary life and its moral problems. Her basic principle is that knowledge and morality are generated in collective action, and she develops it through a critical examination of theories in philosophy, sociology and women's studies, most of which hide the collective nature and as a result hide the lives and knowledge of many people. At issue are the questions of what morality is, and how moral theories (...)
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  11. Women and the Knife: Cosmetic Surgery and the Colonization of Women's Bodies.Kathryn Pauly Morgan - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):25 - 53.
    The paper identifies the phenomenal rise of increasingly invasive forms of elective cosmetic surgery targeted primarily at women and explores its significance in the context of contemporary biotechnology. A Foucauldian analysis of the significance of the normalization of technologized women's bodies is argued for. Three "Paradoxes of Choice" affecting women who "elect" cosmetic surgery are examined. Finally, two utopian feminist political responses are discussed: a Response of Refusal and a Response of Appropriation.
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  12.  89
    Self-Defence and Innocence: Aggressors and Active Threats: Phillip Montague.Phillip Montague - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (1):62-78.
    Although people generally agree that innocent targets of culpable aggression are justified in harming the aggressors in self-defence, there is considerable disagreement regarding whether innocents are justified in defending themselves when their doing so would harm other innocent people. I argue in this essay that harming innocent aggressors and active innocent threats in self-defence is indeed justified under certain conditions, but that defensive actions in such cases are justified as permissions rather than as claim rights. This justification therefore differs from (...)
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  13.  41
    Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question.Kathryn T. Gines - 2014 - Indiana University Press.
    While acknowledging Hannah Arendt's keen philosophical and political insights, Kathryn T. Gines claims that there are some problematic assertions and oversights regarding Arendt’s treatment of the "Negro question." Gines focuses on Arendt's reaction to the desegregation of Little Rock schools, to laws making mixed marriages illegal, and to the growing civil rights movement in the south. Reading them alongside Arendt's writings on revolution, the human condition, violence, and responses to the Eichmann war crimes trial, Gines provides a systematic analysis (...)
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  14.  8
    Impure Thoughts: Essays on Philosophy, Feminism, & Ethics.Kathryn Pyne Addelson - 1991 - Temple University Press.
  15.  33
    Anthropogenesis: Origins and Endings in the Anthropocene.Kathryn Yusoff - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (2):3-28.
    If the Anthropocene represents a new epoch of thought, it also represents a new form of materiality and historicity for the human as strata and stratigrapher of the geologic record. This collision of human and inhuman histories in the strata is a new formation of subjectivity within a geologic horizon that redefines temporal, material, and spatial orders of the human. I argue that the Anthropocene contains within it a form of Anthropogenesis – a new origin story and ontics for man (...)
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  16. Concrete Possible Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2008 - In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell. pp. 111--134.
    In this chapter, I survey what I call Lewisian approaches to modality: approaches that analyze modality in terms of concrete possible worlds and their parts. I take the following four theses to be characteristic of Lewisian approaches to modality. (1) There is no primitive modality. (2) There exists a plurality of concrete possible worlds. (3) Actuality is an indexical concept. (4) Modality de re is to be analyzed in terms of counterparts, not transworld identity. After an introductory section in which (...)
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  17. Island Universes and the Analysis of Modality.Phillip Bricker - 2001 - In G. Preyer & F. Siebelt (eds.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield.
    It follows from Humean principles of plenitude, I argue, that island universes are possible: physical reality might have 'absolutely isolated' parts. This makes trouble for Lewis's modal realism; but the realist has a way out. First, accept absolute actuality, which is defensible, I argue, on independent grounds. Second, revise the standard analysis of modality: modal operators are 'plural', not 'individual', quantifiers over possible worlds. This solves the problem of island universes and confers three additional benefits: an 'unqualified' principle of compossibility (...)
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  18.  41
    Blindsight is Qualitatively Degraded Conscious Vision.Ian Phillips - 2021 - Psychological Review 128 (3):558-584.
  19. Absolute Actuality and the Plurality of Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - Philosophical Perspectives 20 (1):41–76.
    According to David Lewis, a realist about possible worlds must hold that actuality is relative: the worlds are ontologically all on a par; the actual and the merely possible differ, not absolutely, but in how they relate to us. Call this 'Lewisian realism'. The alternative, 'Leibnizian realism', holds that actuality is an absolute property that marks a distinction in ontological status. Lewis presents two arguments against Leibnizian realism. First, he argues that the Leibnizian realist cannot account for the contingency of (...)
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  20. Engendering Democracy.Anne Phillips - 1991 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
  21. Faith After Foundationalism.D. Z. Phillips - 2013 - Routledge.
    Foundationalism is the view that philosophical propositions are of two kinds, those which need supporting evidence, and those which in themselves provide the evidence which renders them irrefutable. This book, originally published 1988, describes the battle between foundationalism, which places belief in God in the first category, and various other approaches to the problem of faith – ‘Reformed Epistemology’, hermeneutics; and sociological analysis. In the concluding section of the book, an examination of concept formation in religious belief is used to (...)
     
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  22. Isolation and Unification: The Realist Analysis of Possible Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):225 - 238.
    If realism about possible worlds is to succeed in eliminating primitive modality, it must provide an 'analysis' of possible world: nonmodal criteria for demarcating one world from another. This David Lewis has done. Lewis holds, roughly, that worlds are maximal unified regions of logical space. So far, so good. But what Lewis means by 'unification' is too narrow, I think, in two different ways. First, for Lewis, all worlds are (almost) 'globally' unified: at any world, (almost) every part is directly (...)
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  23.  69
    How Doctors Think: Clinical Judgment and the Practice of Medicine.Kathryn Montgomery - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    How Doctors Think defines the nature and importance of clinical judgment. Although physicians make use of science, this book argues that medicine is not itself a science but rather an interpretive practice that relies on clinical reasoning. A physician looks at the patient's history along with the presenting physical signs and symptoms and juxtaposes these with clinical experience and empirical studies to construct a tentative account of the illness. How Doctors Think is divided into four parts. Part one introduces the (...)
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  24.  30
    Certain Hope: A. Phillips Griffiths.A. Phillips Griffiths - 1990 - Religious Studies 26 (4):453-461.
    In his recent article 1 Stewart Sutherland rightly and trenchantly criticizes some accounts of hope which ignore, or radically misrepresent, how it is conceived in religious contexts. The most surprising, to me, is Chesterton's, that hope is ‘the power of being cheerful in circumstances which we know to be desperate’. Surprising, not so much for its content as for its source. However, this particular example could be of one who would risk giving scandal for the sake of wit; what he (...)
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  25. Realism Without Parochialism.Phillip Bricker - 2020 - In Modal Matters: Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 40-76.
    I am a realist of a metaphysical stripe. I believe in an immense realm of "modal" and "abstract" entities, of entities that are neither part of, nor stand in any causal relation to, the actual, concrete world. For starters: I believe in possible worlds and individuals; in propositions, properties, and relations (both abundantly and sparsely conceived); in mathematical objects and structures; and in sets (or classes) of whatever I believe in. Call these sorts of entity, and the reality they comprise, (...)
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  26.  53
    Is There a Humean Account of Quantities?Phillip Bricker - 2017 - Philosophical Issues 27 (1):26-51.
    Humeans have a problem with quantities. A core principle of any Humean account of modality is that fundamental entities can freely recombine. But determinate quantities, if fundamental, seem to violate this core principle: determinate quantities belonging to the same determinable necessarily exclude one another. Call this the problem of exclusion. Prominent Humeans have responded in various ways. Wittgenstein, when he resurfaced to philosophy, gave the problem of exclusion as a reason to abandon the logical atomism of the Tractatus with its (...)
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  27. Discrimination and Bias in the Vegan Ideal.Kathryn Paxton George - 1994 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 7 (1):19-28.
    The vegan ideal is entailed by arguments for ethical veganism based on traditional moral theory (rights and/or utilitarianism) extended to animals. The most ideal lifestyle would abjure the use of animals or their products for food since animals suffer and have rights not to be killed. The ideal is discriminatory because the arguments presuppose a male physiological norm that gives a privileged position to adult, middle-class males living in industrialized countries. Women, children, the aged, and others have substantially different nutritional (...)
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  28. Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change.Ian Phillips - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in the (...)
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  29.  5
    Interventions in Ethics.D. Z. Phillips (ed.) - 1992 - State University of New York Press.
    This book contains essays, written between 1965 and 1990, which focus on the need to explore such issues as the nature of moral endeavor, the request for a justification of moral endeavor; the appeal to human flourishing; the nature of the ...
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  30.  65
    The Other Half of Effective Altruism: Selective Asceticism.Kathryn Muyskens - 2017 - Essays in Philosophy 18 (1):91-106.
    What I seek to do in this paper is to reemphasize what I see as the forgotten or neglected other half of the effective altruist equation. Effective altruists need to take seriously the ways in which their actions contribute to systemic inequality and structural violence. Charitable donation is not enough to create a paradigm shift or stop systemic injustice. In tackling systemic injustice, the ascetic response may allow effective altruists to attack the roots of the problem more directly. Further, the (...)
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  31.  13
    Biopolitical Economies and the Political Aesthetics of Climate Change.Kathryn Yusoff - 2010 - Theory, Culture and Society 27 (2-3):73-99.
    As environments and their inhabitants undergo a multitude of abrupt changes due to climate, in the aesthetic field there has been a hardening of a few representational figures that stand in for those contested political ecologies. Biodiversity loss and habitat change can be seen to be forcing an acceleration of archival practices that mobilize various images of the ‘play of the world’, including the making of star species to represent planetary loss, and the consolidation of other species into archives implicitly (...)
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  32.  39
    Augustine's Invention of the Inner Self: The Legacy of a Christian Platonist.Phillip Cary - 2000 - Oup Usa.
    Phillip Cary argues that Augustine invented or created the concept of self as an inner space--as space into which one can enter and in which one can find God. This concept of inwardness, says Cary, has worked its way deeply into the intellectual heritage of the West and many Western individuals have experienced themselves as inner selves. After surveying the idea of inwardness in Augustine's predecessors, Cary offers a re-examination of Augustine's own writings, making the controversial point that in his (...)
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  33. Indirect Representation and the Self-Representational Theory of Consciousness.Ben Phillips - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 167 (2):273-290.
    According to Uriah Kriegel’s self-representational theory of consciousness, mental state M is conscious just in case it is a complex with suitably integrated proper parts, M 1 and M 2, such that M 1 is a higher-order representation of lower-order representation M 2. Kriegel claims that M thereby “indirectly” represents itself, and he attempts to motivate this claim by appealing to what he regards as intuitive cases of indirect perceptual and pictorial representation. For example, Kriegel claims that it’s natural to (...)
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  34.  86
    Philosophy of Psychiatry After Diagnostic Kinds.Kathryn Tabb - 2019 - Synthese 196 (6):2177-2195.
    A significant portion of the scholarship in analytic philosophy of psychiatry has been devoted to the problem of what kind of kind psychiatric disorders are. Efforts have included descriptive projects, which aim to identify what psychiatrists in fact refer to when they diagnose, and prescriptive ones, which argue over that to which diagnostic categories should refer. In other words, philosophers have occupied themselves with what I call “diagnostic kinds”. However, the pride of place traditionally given to diagnostic kinds in psychiatric (...)
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  35.  96
    Plato and Pythagoreanism.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2013 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Was Plato a Pythagorean? Plato's students and earliest critics thought so, but scholars since the nineteenth century have been more skeptical. With this probing study, Phillip Sidney Horky argues that a specific type of Pythagorean philosophy, called "mathematical" Pythagoreanism, exercised a decisive influence on fundamental aspects of Plato's philosophy. The progenitor of mathematical Pythagoreanism was the infamous Pythagorean heretic and political revolutionary Hippasus of Metapontum, a student of Pythagoras who is credited with experiments in harmonics that led to innovations in (...)
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  36.  51
    Does Learning to Count Involve a Semantic Induction?Kathryn Davidson, Kortney Eng & David Barner - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):162-173.
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  37.  37
    The Use and Abuse of Scientific Studies.Kathryn Paxton George - 1992 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (2):217-233.
    In response to Evelyn Pluhar'sWho Can Be Morally Obligated to Be a Vegetarian? in this journal issue, the author has read all of Pluhar's citations for the accuracy of her claims and had these read by an independent nutritionist. Detailed analysis of Pluhar's argument shows that she attempts to make her case by consistent misappropriation of the findings and conclusions of the studies she cites. Pluhar makes sweeping generalizations from scanty data, ignores causal explanations given by scientists, equates hypothesis with (...)
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  38.  12
    Stakes, Scales, and Skepticism.Kathryn Francis, Philip Beaman & Nat Hansen - unknown
    There is conflicting experimental evidence about whether the “stakes” or importance of being wrong affect judgments about whether a subject knows a proposition. To date, judgments about stakes effects on knowledge have been investigated using binary paradigms: responses to “low” stakes cases are compared with responses to “high stakes” cases. However, stakes or importance are not binary properties—they are scalar: whether a situation is “high” or “low” stakes is a matter of degree. So far, no experimental work has investigated the (...)
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  39.  23
    Obliterating Thingness: An Introduction to the “What” and the “So What” of Quantum Physics.Kathryn Schaffer & Gabriela Barreto Lemos - 2019 - Foundations of Science 26 (1):7-26.
    This essay provides a short introduction to the ideas and potential implications of quantum physics for scholars in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Quantum-inspired ideas pepper current discourse in all of these fields, in ways that range from playful metaphors to sweeping ontological claims. We explain several of the most important concepts at the core of quantum theory, carefully delineating the scope and bounds of currently established science, in order to aid the evaluation of such claims. In particular, we (...)
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  40.  50
    Response From Young, Sprengelmeyer, Phillips and Calder.A. W. Young, R. Sprengelmeyer, M. Phillips & A. J. Calder - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (9):322-325.
  41.  8
    Curiosity: Care, Virtue and Pleasure in Uncovering the New.Richard Phillips - 2015 - Theory, Culture and Society 32 (3):149-161.
    It is no longer controversial or suspicious to be curious. But, until recently, there has been little curiosity about curiosity itself. This has begun to change, with the publication of a series of books asking what curiosity is and why it matters. Though an eclectic and slippery subject, taking different forms in different times and places, curiosity has two common threads. The first is ‘care’, comprising commitment or interest and a quality of attention. The second is concerned with ‘questions’, and (...)
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  42.  12
    The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God.D. Z. Phillips - 2004 - Scm Press.
    "This book is D.Z. Phillips' systematic attempt to discuss the problem of evil. He argues that the problem is inextricably linked to our conception of God. In an effort to distinguish between logical and existential problems of evil, that inheritance offers us distorted accounts of God's omnipotence and will. In his interlude, Phillips argues that, as a result, God is ridiculed out of existence, and found unfit to plead before the bar of decency. However, Phillips elucidates a (...)
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  43.  16
    Emotion Management: Sociological Insight Into What, How, Why, and to What End?Kathryn J. Lively & Emi A. Weed - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (3):202-207.
    In recounting some of the key sociological insights offered by over 30 years of research on emotion management, or emotion regulation, we orient our discussion around sociological answers to the following questions: What is emotion management? How does emotion management occur? Why does it occur? And what are its consequences or benefits? In this review, we argue that emotion and its management are profoundly social. Through daily interactions with others, individuals learn to differentiate which emotions are appropriate when, as well (...)
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  44.  18
    The Emergence of Clinical Research Ethics Consultation: Insights From a National Collaborative.Kathryn M. Porter, Marion Danis, Holly A. Taylor, Mildred K. Cho & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (1):39-45.
    The increasing complexity of human subjects research and its oversight has prompted researchers, as well as institutional review boards, to have a forum in which to discuss challenging or novel ethical issues not fully addressed by regulations. Research ethics consultation services provide such a forum. In this article, we rely on the experiences of a national Research Ethics Consultation Collaborative that collected more than 350 research ethics consultations in a repository and published 18 challenging cases with accompanying ethical commentaries to (...)
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  45.  17
    Virtual Morality: Transitioning From Moral Judgment to Moral Action?Kathryn B. Francis, Charles Howard, Ian S. Howard, Michaela Gummerum, Giorgio Ganis, Grace Anderson & Sylvia Terbeck - unknown
    The nature of moral action versus moral judgment has been extensively debated in numerous disciplines. We introduce Virtual Reality moral paradigms examining the action individuals take in a high emotionally arousing, direct action-focused, moral scenario. In two studies involving qualitatively different populations, we found a greater endorsement of utilitarian responses–killing one in order to save many others–when action was required in moral virtual dilemmas compared to their judgment counterparts. Heart rate in virtual moral dilemmas was significantly increased when compared to (...)
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  46.  57
    Myth and Philosophy From the Presocratics to Plato.Kathryn A. Morgan - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book explores the dynamic relationship between myth and philosophy in the Presocratics, the Sophists, and in Plato - a relationship which is found to be more extensive and programmatic than has been recognized. The story of philosophy's relationship with myth is that of its relationship with literary and social convention. The intellectuals studied here wanted to reformulate popular ideas about cultural authority and they achieved this goal by manipulating myth. Their self-conscious use of myth creates a self-reflective philosophic sensibility (...)
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  47.  41
    Forgiveness From a Feminist Perspective.Kathryn Norlock - 2009 - Lexington Books.
    In this monograph, I offer feminist reasons to develop a multidimensional account of forgiveness as a moral, and therefore at least partially deliberative, action or set of actions, which functions as a remedy in responding to blame or condemnation, releasing offenders from the fullness of their blameworthiness, in relational contexts which therefore require considerations of power between relata. I rely on feminist philosophical account of the relational self in order to contextualise these power relations. I provide accounts of forgiveness as (...)
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  48. What Does Decision Theory Have to Do with Wanting?Milo Phillips-Brown - 2021 - Mind 130 (518):413-437.
    Decision theory and folk psychology both purport to represent the same phenomena: our belief-like and desire- and preference-like states. They also purport to do the same work with these representations: explain and predict our actions. But they do so with different sets of concepts. There's much at stake in whether one of these two sets of concepts can be accounted for with the other. Without such an account, we'd have two competing representations and systems of prediction and explanation, a dubious (...)
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  49.  19
    Wittgenstein, Schopenhauer, and Ethics1: A. Phillips Griffiths.A. Phillips Griffiths - 1973 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 7:96-116.
    Wittgenstein always thought that he had not been understood, and indeed that it was very unlikely that many people ever would understand him. Russell not only failed to understand Wittgenstein's later work; according to Wittgenstein himself, Russell profoundly failed to understand even the Tractatus. Professor Anscombe says even she did not understand him, and that to attempt to give an account of what he says is only to express one's own ordinariness or mediocrity or lack of complexity. Certainly, most people (...)
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  50.  7
    Francis Bacon and the Germans: Stories From When 'Science Meant 'Wissenschaft.Denise Phillips - 2015 - History of Science 53 (4):378-394.
    Given that translation is always an imperfect process, why do people single out certain words as simply untranslatable? This article looks at one such supposedly untranslatable term, the German word Wissenschaft. Rather than take the word’s status as a given, it examines the historical processes through which Wissenschaft came to be seen as a word impossible to render into English. The article examines a mid-nineteenth century debate about Francis Bacon to show that as late as the 1860s “science” and “ (...)
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