Results for 'Jesse Norman'

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  1.  11
    Jesse Norman. After Euclid: Visual Reasoning and the Epistemology of Diagrams. Stanford: CSLI Publications, 2006. ISBN 1-57586-509-2 ; 1-57586-510-6 . Pp. Vii +176. [REVIEW]Jesse Norman - 2007 - Philosophia Mathematica 15 (1):116-121.
    This monograph treats the important topic of the epistemology of diagrams in Euclidean geometry. Norman argues that diagrams play a genuine justificatory role in traditional Euclidean arguments, and he aims to account for these roles from a modified Kantian perspective. Norman considers himself a semi-Kantian in the following broad sense: he believes that Kant was right that ostensive constructions are necessary in order to follow traditional Euclidean proofs, but he wants to avoid appealing to Kantian a priori intuition (...)
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  2.  76
    Review: The Iconic Logic of Peirce's Graphs. [REVIEW]Jesse Norman - 2004 - Mind 113 (452):783-787.
  3.  70
    Review: The Philosophical Status of Diagrams. [REVIEW]Jesse Norman - 2004 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):801-805.
  4.  28
    Can Diagrams Have Epistemic Value? The Case of Euclid.Jesse Norman - 2004 - In A. Blackwell, K. Marriott & A. Shimojima (eds.), Diagrammatic Representation and Inference. Springer. pp. 14--17.
  5.  25
    Taking the BS Out of The Big Society.Jesse Norman - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 55 (55):120-126.
    “We shouldn’t be scared of philosophy. Ideas are always in charge, we might as well get self-conscious about what they are.”.
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  6.  10
    The Iconic Logic of Peirce's Graphs. [REVIEW]Jesse Norman - 2004 - Mind 113 (452):783-787.
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  7.  8
    Taking the BS Out of The Big Society.Jesse Norman - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 55:120-126.
    “We shouldn’t be scared of philosophy. Ideas are always in charge, we might as well get self-conscious about what they are.”.
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  8.  18
    Provability in Peirce's Alpha Graphs.Jesse Norman - 2003 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (1):23 - 41.
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  9.  11
    Revisiting the Graphical/Linguistic Debate.Jesse Norman - 2004 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (10):139-148.
    We seem to have strong intuitions that many visual representations -- such as descriptions, depictions and diagrams -- can be classified into different types. But how should we understand the differences between these representational types? On a standard view, the answer is assumed to lie in the presence or absence of a single property. I argue first that this assumption is undermotivated, and offer a particular two-property analysis, which can be used both to differentiate the various types and to understand (...)
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  10. The Achievement of Michael Oakeshott.Jesse Norman (ed.) - 1993 - Duckworth.
  11. The Archievement of Michael Oakeshott.Jesse Norman - 1993 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 55 (3):565-566.
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  12. Can There Be a Just War?: Norman Can There Be a Just War?Richard J. Norman - 2004 - Think 3 (8):7-16.
    Richard Norman examines justifications for war that are rooted in the right of self-defence.
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  13.  90
    Applied Ethics: What is Applied to What?: Richard Norman.Richard Norman - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):119-136.
    This paper criticizes the conception of applied ethics as the top-down application of a theory to practical issues. It is argued that a theory such as utilitarianism cannot override our intuitive moral perceptions. We cannot be radically mistaken about the kinds of considerations which count as practical reasons, and it is the task of theoretical ethics to articulate the basic kinds of considerations which we appeal to in practical discussions. Dworkin's model of doing ethics ‘from the inside out’ is used (...)
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  14.  25
    The Primacy of Practice: ‘Intelligent Idealism’ in Marxist Thought1: Richard Norman.Richard Norman - 1982 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 13:155-179.
    The chief defect of all previous materialism is that things, reality, the sensible world, are conceived only in the form of objects of observation , but not as human sense activity , not as practical activity , not subjectively. Hence, in opposition to materialism, the active side was developed abstractly by idealism, which of course does not know real sense activity as such.
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  15.  24
    Technology, Crisis, and Interaction Design: A Conversation with Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman, and Derrick de Kerckhove.Lorenzo Imbesi, Bruce Sterling, Donald Norman & Derrick de Kerckhove - 2010 - Mediatropes 2 (2):128-135.
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  16.  20
    Gradations of Awareness in a Modified Sequence Learning Task.Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price, Simon C. Duff & Rune A. Mentzoni - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):809-837.
    We argue performance in the serial reaction time task is associated with gradations of awareness that provide examples of fringe consciousness [Mangan, B. . Taking phenomenology seriously: the “fringe” and its implications for cognitive research. Consciousness and Cognition, 2, 89–108, Mangan, B. . The conscious “fringe”: Bringing William James up to date. In B. J. Baars, W. P. Banks & J. B. Newman , Essential sources in the scientific study of consciousness . Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.], and address limitations (...)
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  17.  62
    Ethics, Killing and War.Richard Norman - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Can war ever be justified? Why is it wrong to kill? In this new book Richard Norman looks at these and other related questions, and thereby examines the possibility and nature of rational moral argument. Practical examples, such as the Gulf War and the Falklands War, are used to show that, whilst moral philosophy can offer no easy answers, it is a worthwhile enterprise which sheds light on many pressing contemporary problems. A combination of lucid exposition and original argument (...)
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  18.  42
    Ethics, Killing and War.Steven Lee & Richard Norman - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (1):129.
    War, Richard Norman reminds us, is treated as the great exception to the strong moral prohibition against the killing of other humans. Despite the widespread belief that war is, in many cases, permissible, its morally exceptional character suggests that there is a strong presumption against its permissibility. Norman argues that this presumption cannot be successfully rebutted and, in particular, that just-war theory, which attempts to provide such a rebuttal, fails in this endeavor. But Norman’s work is more (...)
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  19.  29
    On Humanism.Richard Norman - 2004 - Routledge.
    humanism /'hju:menizm/ n. an outlook or system of thought concerned with human rather than divine or supernatural matters. Albert Einstein, Isaac Asimov, E.M. Forster, Bertrand Russell, and Gloria Steinem all declared themselves humanists. What is humanism and why does it matter? Is there any doctrine every humanist must hold? If it rejects religion, what does it offer in its place? Have the twentieth century's crimes against humanity spelled the end for humanism? On Humanism is a timely and powerfully argued philosophical (...)
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  20.  35
    Free and Equal: A Philosophical Examination of Political Values.Richard Norman - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    The concepts of freedom and equality lie at the heart of much contemporary political debate. But how, exactly, are these concepts to be understood? And do they really represent desirable political values? Norman begins from the premise that freedom and equality are rooted in human experience, and thus have a real and objective content. He then argues that the attempt to clarify these concepts is therefore not just a matter of idle philosophical speculation, but also a matter of practical (...)
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  21.  40
    Swinburne's Arguments From Design.Richard Norman - 2003 - Think 2 (4):35-41.
    In issue one, Richard Swinburne presented two ingenious versions of the argument from design. Here, Richard Norman questions both arguments.
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  22.  42
    Strategic Control in AGL is Not Attributable to Simple Letter Frequencies Alone.Elisabeth Norman, Mark C. Price, Emma Jones & Zoltan Dienes - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1933-1934.
    In Norman, Price, and Jones , we argued that the ability to apply two sets of grammar rules flexibly from trial to trial on a “mixed-block” AGL classification task indicated strategic control over knowledge that was less than fully explicit. Jiménez suggested that our results do not in themselves prove that participants learned – and strategically controlled – complex properties of the structures of the grammars, but that they may be accounted for by learning of simple letter frequencies. We (...)
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  23.  72
    Good Without God.Richard Norman - 2008 - Think 7 (20):35-46.
    In the fifth of our articles on , Richard Norman explains why he believes we can be good without God.
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  24. Nietzsche: Beyond Good and Evil: Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future.Rolf-Peter Horstmann & Judith Norman (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Beyond Good and Evil is one of the most scathing and powerful critiques of philosophy, religion, science, politics and ethics ever written. In it, Nietzsche presents a set of problems, criticisms and philosophical challenges that continue both to inspire and to trouble contemporary thought. In addition, he offers his most subtle, detailed and sophisticated account of the virtues, ideas, and practices which will characterize philosophy and philosophers of the future. With his relentlessly energetic style and tirelessly probing manner, Nietzsche embodies (...)
     
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  25.  99
    Edmund Burke: Philosopher, Politician, Prophet.Mark Hannam - manuscript
    Review of Jesse Norman, "Edmund Burke: Philosopher, Politician, Prophet" (William Collins, 2013).
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  26.  62
    Climate Change and Norman Daniels' Theory of Just Health: An Essay on Basic Needs. [REVIEW]Joseph Lacey - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (1):3-14.
    Norman Daniels, in applying Rawls’ theory of justice to the issue of human health, ideally presupposes that society exists in a state of moderate scarcity. However, faced with problems like climate change, many societies find that their state of moderate scarcity is increasingly under threat. The first part of this essay aims to determine the consequences for Daniels’ theory of just health when we incorporate into Rawls’ understanding of justice the idea that the condition of moderate scarcity can fail. (...)
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  27.  87
    How Not to Be a Metaethical Naturalist –Jesse Prinz on the Emotional Construction of Morals.Tanya de Villiers-Botha - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):145-154.
    Jesse Prinz develops a naturalistic metaethical theory with which he purports to sidestep ‘Hume's law’ by demonstrating how, on his theory, in describing what our moral beliefs commit us to we can determine what our moral obligations are. I aim to show that Prinz does not deliver on his prescriptive promise – he does not bridge the is–ought gap in any meaningful way. Given that Prinz goes on to argue that (1) his moral psychology highlights fundamental shortcomings in ‘traditional’ (...)
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  28.  26
    Can Empathy Be a Moral Resource? A Smithean Reply to Jesse Prinz.Millicent Churcher - 2016 - Dialogue 55 (3):429-447.
    This paper critiques Jesse Prinz’s rejection of Adam Smith’s model of impartial spectatorship as a viable corrective to empathic bias. I argue that Prinz’s case is unconvincing, insofar as it rests on an underdeveloped account of Smith’s view of critical self-regulation. By presenting a more detailed and attentive reading of Smithean impartial spectatorship, and exploring Smith’s compelling account of structural supports for sympathetic engagement, this paper demonstrates how Smith’s work is able to constructively engage with contemporary concerns regarding empathy’s (...)
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  29. The Letters of Baron Friedrich von Hügel and Professor Norman Kemp Smith.Friedrich Hügel, Norman Kemp Smith & Lawrence F. Barmann - 1981
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  30. The Conscious Brain: How Attention Engenders Experience, by Jesse Prinz.Wayne Wu - 2013 - Mind 122 (488):1174-1180.
  31. A Discussion Between Wittgenstein and Moore on Certainty : From the Notes of Norman Malcolm.Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E. Moore, Norman Malcolm & Gabriel Citron - 2015 - Mind 124 (493):73-84.
    In April 1939, G. E. Moore read a paper to the Cambridge University Moral Science Club entitled ‘Certainty’. In it, amongst other things, Moore made the claims that: the phrase ‘it is certain’ could be used with sense-experience-statements, such as ‘I have a pain’, to make statements such as ‘It is certain that I have a pain’; and that sense-experience-statements can be said to be certain in the same sense as some material-thing-statements can be — namely in the sense that (...)
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  32. Incorporating the Corporation in Citizenship: A Response to Néron and Norman.Andrew Crane & Dirk Matten - 2008 - Business Ethics Quarterly 18 (1):27-33.
    This article presents a response to Néron and Norman’s contention that the language of citizenship is helpful in thinking about the political dimensions of corporate responsibilities. We argue that Néron and Norman’s main conclusions are valid but offer an extension of their analysis to incorporate extant streams of literature dealing with the political role of the corporation. We also propose that the perspective on citizenship adopted by Néron and Norman is rather narrow, andtherefore provide some alternative ways (...)
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  33.  83
    Norman and Truetemp Revisited Reliabilistically: A Proper Functionalist Defeat Account of Clairvoyance.Harmen Ghijsen - 2015 - Episteme 13 (1):89-110.
    The cases of Norman the Clairvoyant and Mr. Truetemp form classic counterexamples to the process reliabilist's claim that reliability is sufficient for prima facie justification. I discuss several ways in which contemporary reliabilists have tried to deal with these counterexamples, and argue that they are all unsuccessful. Instead, I propose that the most promising route lies with an appeal to a specific kind of higher-order defeat that is best cashed out in terms of properly functioning monitoring mechanisms.
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  34.  30
    History, Genealogy, Nietzsche: Comments on Jesse Prinz, "Genealogies of Morals: Nietzsche's Method Compared". Migotti - 2016 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):212-227.
    Jesse Prinz compares Nietzsche’s genealogy of morals to its utilitarian and materialist counterparts and gives two cheers for the Nietzschean approach.1 The project is well conceived; and—readers of this journal will not need to be convinced of this—the recognition of Nietzsche’s achievement is deserved and welcome. But when we get to “the particular go of it,”2 Prinz’s account of what Nietzsche’s achievement is, I have reservations. Though we have much to learn from his juxtaposing Nietzschean genealogy to its utilitarian (...)
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  35. Aquinas’s Moral Theory: Essays in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. [REVIEW]Simo Knuuttila - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):596-599.
    The editors comment that the core of this book is formed by the papers presented as a special session at the Ninth International Congress of Medieval Philosophy, honoring Norman Kretzmann’s contribution to the study of medieval philosophy. They decided to publish these papers with other essays devoted to issues in Aquinas’s moral theory specially commissioned from a group of Kretzmann’s colleagues, friends, and former students. The book, consisting of ten essays and a list of Kretzmann’s publications on Aquinas, is (...)
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  36.  55
    Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann.Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.) - 1993 - Cornell University Press.
  37.  3
    Can Norman Daniels Help You Get a Wheelchair? A Commentary on Durocher Et Al.Mary Yvonne Egan - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):192-195.
    Durocher and colleagues argue that Norman Daniels’s notion of just health could provide a useful framework for decreasing inequities in access to assistive technology. I argue that it would provide limited help for two reasons. First, Daniels’s reliance on normal species functioning as the goal of health care and his assumptions regarding the impact of normal species functioning on reasonable life projects create substantial difficulties for application to assistive technology. Second, although Daniels’s requirements for distributive justice provide a critical (...)
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  38.  40
    Age Rationing and Prudential Lifespan Account in Norman Daniels' Just Health.S. Brauer - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (1):27-31.
    Could age be a valid criterion for rationing? In Just health, Norman Daniels argues that under certain circumstances age rationing is prudent, and therefore a morally permissible strategy to tackle the problem of resource scarcity. Crucial to his argument is the distinction between two problem-settings of intergenerational equity: equity among age groups and equity among birth cohorts. While fairness between age groups can involve unequal benefit treatment in different life stages, fairness between birth cohorts implies enjoying approximate equality in (...)
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  39.  83
    Symposium on the Rationing of Health Care: 2 Rationing Medical Care — A Philosopher's Perspective on Outcomes and Process: Norman Daniels.Norman Daniels - 1998 - Economics and Philosophy 14 (1):27-50.
  40.  49
    The Distinction Between Intuition and Guessing in the SRT Task Generation: A Reply to Norman and Price.Qiufang Fu, Zoltán Dienes & Xiaolan Fu - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):478-480.
    We investigated the extent to which people could generate sequences of responses based on knowledge acquired from the Serial Reaction Time task, depending on whether it felt subjectively like the response was based on pure guessing, intuition, conscious rules or memories. Norman and Price argued that in the context of our task, intuition responses were the same as guessing responses. In reply, we argue that not only do subjects apparently claim to be experiencing different phenomenologies when saying intuition versus (...)
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  41.  19
    Justice and Justification: Reflective Equilibrium in Theory and Practice Norman Daniels Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Public Policy New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xiii + 365 Pp., $59.95, $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Mark Vorobej - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):853-854.
    Norman Daniels is perhaps best known as one of America’s foremost champions of coherentist moral epistemology, and the justificatory method of wide reflective equilibrium in particular. The striking coherence of Daniels’s career itself is evident in this collection of sixteen of his essays, composed over an eighteen-year period. To a large extent, these essays extend the work of John Rawls—either by attempting to make greater theoretical sense of WRE, or by applying abstract Rawlsian arguments to concrete social problems in (...)
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  42.  11
    The Case of Yogakṣema/Yogakkhema in Vedic and Suttapiṭaka Sources. In Response to Norman.Tiziana Pontillo & Chiara Neri - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):527-563.
    Norman in 1969 emphasised a linguistic difference between the Vedic compound yogakṣema- interpreted as a dvandva and the widely distributed Early Buddhist compound yogakkhema-, analysed as a tatpuruṣa “rest from exertion”. On the basis of our analysis of the relevant Pali sources and of the more ancient Vedic occurrences—some of which are quite far from the earliest denotation of the two cyclic phases of the assumed semi-nomadic Indo-Āryan life—we have undertaken a classification of the several meanings of this compound, (...)
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  43.  13
    Being and Owning: The Body, Bodily Material, and the Law by Jesse Wall. [REVIEW]Sean Aas - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):13-16.
    Jesse Wall's Being and Owning: The Body, Bodily Material, and the Law addresses the legal status of 'bodily material'; items which used to be, but are no longer, part of a living human organism: especially, 'separated' materials like gametes or tissue samples, and cadavers and other mortal remains. Wall's discussion, however, ranges widely across jurisprudential and philosophical issues concerning our relation to our bodies and our rights in them. His central, plausible contention is that body rights, though a kind (...)
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  44. The Emotional Construction of Morals • by Jesse Prinz: Summary.Jesse Prinz - 2009 - Analysis 69 (4).
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  45.  39
    Norman Bowie and Richard Rorty on Multinationals: Does Business Ethics Need 'Metaphysical Comfort?'. [REVIEW]Andrew C. Wicks - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):191 - 200.
    Norman Bowie wrote an article on the moral obligations of multinational corporations in 1987. This paper is a response to Bowie, but more importantly, it is designed to articulate the force and substance of the pragmatist philosophy developed by Richard Rorty. In his article, Bowie suggested that moral universalism (which he endorses) is the only credible method of doing business ethics across cultures and that cultural relativism and ethnocentrism are not. Bowie, in a manner surprisingly common among contemporary philosophers, (...)
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  46. Malcolm, Norman.Richard McDonough - 2017 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Norman Malcolm Norman Malcolm was instrumental in elaborating and defending Wittgenstein’s philosophy, which he saw as akin to a kind of “ordinary language” philosophy, in America. He also defended a novel interpretation of Moore’s “common sense philosophy” as a version of ordinary language philosophy, although Moore himself disagreed. Malcolm criticized Descartes’ account of mind … Continue reading Malcolm, Norman →.
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  47.  38
    Justice Between Age‐Groups: A Comment on Norman Daniels.Dennis Mckerlie - 1989 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 6 (2):227-234.
    ABSTRACT Norman Daniels suggests that the just distribution of resources between different age‐groups is determined by the choice a prudential agent would make in budgeting resources over the different temporal stages of a single life. He calls this view the “prudential lifespan account” of justice between age‐groups. Daniels thinks that the view recommends a rough kind of equality in resources between age‐groups. I argue that in the case of a single life prudence would choose an unequal distribution of resources. (...)
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  48.  81
    Racist Appearance Standards and the Enhancements That Love Them: Norman Daniels and Skin-Lightening Cosmetics.Matt Lamkin - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (4):185-191.
    Darker skin correlates with reduced opportunities and negative health outcomes. Recent discoveries related to the genes associated with skin tone, and the historical use of cosmetics to conform to racist appearance standards, suggest effective skin-lightening products may soon become available. This article examines whether medical interventions of this sort should be permitted, subsidized, or restricted, using Norman Daniels's framework for determining what justice requires in terms of protecting health. I argue that Daniels's expansive view of the requirements of justice (...)
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  49.  47
    Libertarianism: Some Conceptual Problems: Norman Barry.Norman Barry - 1989 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 26:109-127.
    Perhaps the most remarkable event in social thought of the last twenty years has been the resurgence of various strands of individualism as political doctrines. The term ‘individualism’ is a kind of general rubric that encompasses elements of nineteenth century classical liberalism, laissez-faire economics, the theory of the minimal state, and an extreme mutation out of this intellectual gene pool, anarcho-capitalism. The term libertarianism itself is applied indiscriminately to all of those doctrines. It has no precise meaning, except that in (...)
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  50.  91
    Jesse J. Prinz,Furnishing the Mind: Concepts and Their Perceptual Basis. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2002. [REVIEW]Jonathan M. Weinberg, Daniel Yarlett, Michael Ramscar, Dan Ryder & Jesse J. Prinz - 2003 - Metascience 12 (3):279-303.
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