Results for 'Frances Brazier'

998 found
Order:
  1.  48
    Anonymity and Software Agents: An Interdisciplinary Challenge. [REVIEW]Frances Brazier, Anja Oskamp, Corien Prins, Maurice Schellekens & Niek Wijngaards - 2004 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):137-157.
    Software agents that play a role in E-commerce and E-government applications involving the Internet often contain information about the identity of their human user such as credit cards and bank accounts. This paper discusses whether this is necessary: whether human users and software agents are allowed to be anonymous under the relevant legal regimes and whether an adequate interaction and balance between law and anonymity can be realised from both the perspective of Computer Systems and the perspective of Law.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2.  48
    Law-Abiding and Integrity on the Internet: A Case for Agents. [REVIEW]Frances Brazier, Anja Oskamp, Corien Prins, Maurice Schellekens & Niek Wijngaards - 2004 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):5-37.
    Software agents extend the current, information-based Internet to include autonomous mobile processing. In most countries such processes, i.e., software agents are, however, without an explicit legal status. Many of the legal implications of their actions (e.g., gathering information, negotiating terms, performing transactions) are not well understood. One important characteristic of mobile software agents is that they roam the Internet: they often run on agent platforms of others. There often is no pre-existing relation between the owner of a running agents process (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  31
    Granularity in Reciprocity.Caroline Nevejan & Frances Brazier - 2012 - AI and Society 27 (1):129-147.
    Witnessing in merging biological, social and algorithmic realities is crucial to trust, as modelled in the YUTPA framework. Being witness and bearing witness is fundamental to human interaction. System participation in human communities of practice challenges the notion of witnessing and therefore the ability to build trust. Nevertheless, through trial and error, people in a variety of practices have found ways to establish the presence and develop trust in merging realities. This paper presents the results of 20 in-depth interviews with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4.  33
    I–Frances M. Kamm.Frances M. Kamm - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):21-39.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  5.  5
    Great Idea: What a Fuss About a Swab.Margot R. Brazier - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (8):534-535.
    Developing a simple test to identify swiftly neonates with sepsis who carry the genetic variant which means that one dose of the recommended antibiotic, gentamicin, will cause the child to become profoundly deaf looks like an admirable objective. The baby needs antibiotics and needs them within 1 hour of admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. Conventional genetic tests take much longer to yield results. The test being trialled produces results in 25 min; a baby who carries the variant can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6.  60
    1 Frances Kamm.Frances Kamm - unknown
    In The Gay Science, Friedrich Nietzsche argued that only a form of philosophizing that sprung from a deep commitment to the subject could ever hope for success. ‘All great problems,’ he wrote, ‘demand great love.’ He continued: It makes the most telling difference whether a thinker has a personal relationship to his problems and finds in them his destiny, his distress, and his greatest happiness, or an ‘impersonal’ one, meaning he is only able to touch them with the antennae of (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  46
    C. S. Lewis: The Question of Multiple Incarnations.Paul Brazier - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (3):391-408.
    Formulated by Aquinas, commented on by post-Copernican philosophers and theologians, analysed in depth by C.S. Lewis, and deliberated by some contemporary writers, the question of multiple incarnations either within humanity or amongst extra-terrestrial sentient species is all too intermittently examined: ‘Can the Christ be incarnated more than once in our reality, or somewhere else in the universe, or another reality?’ In this paper, we examine the debate and the conclusions: that is, Lewis’s position within his philosophical theology and his analogical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  70
    Exploitation and Enrighment: The Paradox of Medical Experimentation.M. Brazier - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):180--183.
    Modern medicine is built on a long history of medical experimentation. Experiments in the past often exploited more vulnerable patients. Questionable ethics litter the history of medicine. Without such experiments, however, millions of lives would be forfeited. This paper asks whether all the ``unethical'' experiments of the past were unjustifiable, and do we still exploit the poorer members of the community today? It concludes by wondering if Harris is right in his advocacy of a moral duty to participate in medical (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  9. In Search of the Deep Structure of Morality: An Interview with Frances Kamm.Alex Voorhoeve & Frances Kamm - 2006 - Imprints 9 (2):93-117.
    An extended discussion with Frances Kamm about deontology and the methodology of ethical theorizing. (An extended and revised version appears in Alex Voorhoeve, Conversations on Ethics, OUP 2009).).
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Hard Cases Make Bad Law?M. Brazier - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):341-343.
  11.  30
    Signs of God: Miracles & Their Interpretation. Mark Corner and How Much Does God Foreknow? A Comprehensive Biblical Study. Stephen C. Roy. [REVIEW]Paul Brazier - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (3):521-523.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12.  24
    Organ Retention and Return: Problems of Consent.M. Brazier - 2003 - Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):30-33.
    This paper explores difficulties around consent in the context of organ retention and return. It addresses the proposals of the Independent Review Group in Scotland on the Retention of Organs at Post Mortem to speak of authorisation rather than consent. Practical problems about whose consent determines disputes in relation to organ retention are explored. If a young child dies and his mother refuses consent but his father agrees what should ensue? Should the expressed wishes of a deceased adult override the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  13.  33
    Diary of Frances Chesterton, 1904-1905.Frances Chesterton & Aidan Mackey - 1999 - The Chesterton Review 25 (3):283-293.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Individualism, Computation, and Perceptual Content.Frances Egan - 1992 - Mind 101 (403):443-59.
  15. How to Think About Mental Content.Frances Egan - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 170 (1):115-135.
    Introduction: representationalismMost theorists of cognition endorse some version of representationalism, which I will understand as the view that the human mind is an information-using system, and that human cognitive capacities are representational capacities. Of course, notions such as ‘representation’ and ‘information-using’ are terms of art that require explication. As a first pass, representations are “mediating states of an intelligent system that carry information” (Markman and Dietrich 2001, p. 471). They have two important features: (1) they are physically realized, and so (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  16.  99
    Must Psychology Be Individualistic?Frances Egan - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (April):179-203.
  17. Deceased Organ Donation: In Praise of Pragmatism.Margaret Brazier & Muireann Quigley - 2007 - Clinical Ethics 2 (4):164-165.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18.  85
    Function-Theoretic Explanation and the Search for Neural Mechanisms.Frances Egan - 2017 - In Explanation and Integration in Mind and Brain Science 145-163. Oxford, UK: pp. 145-163.
    A common kind of explanation in cognitive neuroscience might be called functiontheoretic: with some target cognitive capacity in view, the theorist hypothesizes that the system computes a well-defined function (in the mathematical sense) and explains how computing this function constitutes (in the system’s normal environment) the exercise of the cognitive capacity. Recently, proponents of the so-called ‘new mechanist’ approach in philosophy of science have argued that a model of a cognitive capacity is explanatory only to the extent that it reveals (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  19. Famine Ethics: The Problem of Distance in Morality and Singer's Ethical Theory.Frances Kamm - 1999 - In Dale Jamieson (ed.), Singer and His Critics. Blackwell. pp. 174--203.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  20.  33
    Review of Cummins' Representations, Targets, and Attitudes. [REVIEW]Frances Egan - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (1):118.
    “Naturalistic” semantic theories attempt to specify, in nonintentional and nonsemantic terms, a sufficient condition for a mental representation’s having a particular meaning. Such theories have trouble accounting for the possibility of representational error. In his latest book, Robert Cummins traces the problem to the fact that the theories currently on offer identify the meaning of a representation with certain features of its use. Only a theory that takes meaning to be an intrinsic feature of a representation, Cummins argues, can both (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  21.  46
    Letting Babies Die.M. Brazier & D. Archard - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):125-126.
    Prolonging neonatal lifeThe paradox that medicine’s success breeds medicine’s problems is well known to readers of the Journal of Medical Ethics. Advances in neonatal medicine have worked wonders. Not long ago, extremely premature birth babies, or those born with very serious health problems, would inevitably have died. Today, neonatologists can resuscitate babies born at ever-earlier stages of gestation. And very ill babies also benefit from advances in neonatal intensive care. Infant lives can be prolonged. Unfortunately, several such babies will not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Philosophical Proofs Against Common Sense.Bryan Frances - forthcoming - Analysis.
    Many philosophers are sceptical about the power of philosophy to refute commonsensical claims. They look at the famous attempts and judge them inconclusive. I prove that even if those famous attempts are failures, there are alternative successful philosophical proofs against commonsensical claims. After presenting the proofs I briefly comment on their significance.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  55
    The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life.Frances Kamm - 2007 - Philosophical Review 116 (2):273-280.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   92 citations  
  24. The Reflective Epistemic Renegade.Bryan Frances - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (2):419 - 463.
    Philosophers often find themselves in disagreement with contemporary philosophers they know full well to be their epistemic superiors on the topics relevant to the disagreement. This looks epistemically irresponsible. I offer a detailed investigation of this problem of the reflective epistemic renegade. I argue that although in some cases the renegade is not epistemically blameworthy, and the renegade situation is significantly less common than most would think, in a troublesome number of cases in which the situation arises the renegade is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  25.  16
    Why We Wrote... Medicine, Patients and the Law.Margaret Brazier & Emma Cave - 2008 - Clinical Ethics 3 (4):205-208.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  22
    C. S. Lewis & Christological Prefigurement.P. H. Brazier - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (5):742–775.
    This paper is an examination of the Christology and Pneumatology that C. S. Lewis read from the apparent prefiguring of elements of the Incarnation‐Resurrection narrative in religious myths, and also his assertion that the incarnation‐resurrection narrative operates on us both as fact and myth. After an initial examination of the term myth and mythopoeia, Lewis' writings on the myth that became reality are discussed along with examples of prefigurement. Through his understanding of natural theology and his cautious respect for human (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27.  29
    Letting Charlotte Die.M. Brazier - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):519-520.
    The High Court ruling that a premature baby should be not be resuscitatedLate in the afternoon of Thursday, 7 October 2004, Mr Justice Hedley ruled in a highly publicised dispute between parents and doctors about the future care of a severely disabled infant.1 With sadness, and some reluctance, the judge held that Charlotte Wyatt should not be subjected to any further invasive or aggressive treatment to prolong her life, despite her parents’ insistence that she be given every chance to survive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  28.  50
    Scepticism Comes Alive.Bryan Frances - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    In epistemology the nagging voice of the sceptic has always been present, whispering that 'You can't know that you have hands, or just about anything else, because for all you know your whole life is a dream.' Philosophers have recently devised ingenious ways to argue against and silence this voice, but Bryan Frances now presents a highly original argument template for generating new kinds of radical scepticism, ones that hold even if all the clever anti-sceptical fixes defeat the traditional (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  29.  50
    Unfinished Feticide: A Legal Commentary.M. Brazier - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (2):68-70.
    Jansen expresses concern as to the legal implications of both selective reduction of pregnancy and unsuccessful attempts at termination of pregnancy using mifepristone. This commentary examines the legality of both procedures and concludes that Jansen is over-optimistic in his belief that neither procedure is likely to fall foul of the criminal laws on induced abortion. By contrast his anxieties about civil liability arising from the subsequent live birth of a damaged infant are, it is suggested, unnecessarily pessimistic. Such an action (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  10
    Understanding Art and Understanding Persons: Frances Berenson.Frances Berenson - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 17:43-60.
    I have been asked to contribute a paper to the present series of lectures on culture, specifically on whether it is possible to understand the art of other cultures. What I find intriguing is why this question arises; why is such understanding seen as a problem needing discussion? These are significant questions. How they are answered will be important for any possibility of cross-cultural aesthetic judgments and aesthetic experience. In order to deal with them it is necessary to see how (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  8
    Where the Law and the Ethics Conflict?Margot Brazier - 2005 - Research Ethics 1 (3):97-100.
    An increasing number of scientists and doctors are concerned that new laws are inhibiting ethical research. This paper argues that this is not the case. Laws do not inhibit medical progress. Misunderstanding the law may do so.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Is There a Problem with Enhancement?Frances M. Kamm - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):5 – 14.
    This article examines arguments concerning enhancement of human persons recently presented by Michael Sandel (2004). In the first section, I briefly describe some of his arguments. In section two, I consider whether, as Sandel claims, the desire for mastery motivates enhancement and whether such a desire could be grounds for its impermissibility. Section three considers how Sandel draws the distinction between treatment and enhancement, and the relation to nature that he thinks each expresses. The fourth section examines Sandel's views about (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   49 citations  
  33. Deciding Whom to Help, Health–Adjusted Life Years and Disabilities.Frances Kamm - 2004 - In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oxford University Press. pp. 225--242.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  34. A Deflationary Account of Mental Representation.Frances Egan - forthcoming - In Joulia Smortchkova, Krzysztof Dolega & Tobias Schlicht (eds.), Mental Representations. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Among the cognitive capacities of evolved creatures is the capacity to represent. Theories in cognitive neuroscience typically explain our manifest representational capacities by positing internal representations, but there is little agreement about how these representations function, especially with the relatively recent proliferation of connectionist, dynamical, embodied, and enactive approaches to cognition. In this talk I sketch an account of the nature and function of representation in cognitive neuroscience that couples a realist construal of representational vehicles with a pragmatic account of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Discovering Disagreeing Epistemic Peers and Superiors.Bryan Frances - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (1):1 - 21.
    Suppose you know that someone is your epistemic peer regarding some topic. You admit that you cannot think of any relevant epistemic advantage you have over her when it comes to that topic; you admit that she is just as likely as you to get P's truth-value right. Alternatively, you might know that she is your epistemic superior regarding the topic. And then after learning this about her you find out that she disagrees with you about P. In those situations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  11
    Not so New Directions in the Law of Consent? ExaminingMontgomery V Lanarkshire Health Board.Anne Maree Farrell & Margaret Brazier - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):85-88.
  37. Computation and Content.Frances Egan - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (2):181-203.
  38.  57
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   103 citations  
  39. Computational Models: A Modest Role for Content.Frances Egan - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):253-259.
    The computational theory of mind construes the mind as an information-processor and cognitive capacities as essentially representational capacities. Proponents of the view claim a central role for representational content in computational models of these capacities. In this paper I argue that the standard view of the role of representational content in computational models is mistaken; I argue that representational content is to be understood as a gloss on the computational characterization of a cognitive process.Keywords: Computation; Representational content; Cognitive capacities; Explanation.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  40. The Nature and Function of Content in Computational Models.Frances Egan - 2018 - In Mark Sprevak & Matteo Colombo (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Computational Mind. Routledge.
    Much of computational cognitive science construes human cognitive capacities as representational capacities, or as involving representation in some way. Computational theories of vision, for example, typically posit structures that represent edges in the distal scene. Neurons are often said to represent elements of their receptive fields. Despite the ubiquity of representational talk in computational theorizing there is surprisingly little consensus about how such claims are to be understood. The point of this chapter is to sketch an account of the nature (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  41. Content is Pragmatic: Comments on Nicholas Shea's Representation in Cognitive Science.Frances Egan - 2020 - Mind and Language 35 (3):368-376.
    Nicholas Shea offers Varitel Semantics as a naturalistic account of mental content. I argue that the account secures determinate content only by appeal to pragmatic considerations, and so it fails to respect naturalism. But that is fine, because representational content is not, strictly speaking, necessary for explanation in cognitive science. Even in Shea’s own account, content serves only a variety of heuristic functions.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  25
    Studying Children: Phenomenological Insights. [REVIEW]Frances Chaput Waksler - 1986 - Human Studies 9 (1):71 - 82.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  43.  25
    The Organs Crisis and the Spanish Model: Theoretical Versus Pragmatic Considerations.M. Quigley, M. Brazier, R. Chadwick, M. N. Michel & D. Paredes - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):223-224.
    In the United Kingdom, the debate about how best to meet the shortfall of organs for transplantation has persisted on and off for many years. It is often presumed that the answer is simply to alter the law to a system of presumed consent. Acting perhaps on that presumption in his annual report launched in July, the Chief Medical Officer, Sir Liam Donaldson, advocated a system of organ donation based on presumed consent, the so-called “opt-out” system.1 He is calling for (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44. When Suits Meet Roots: The Antecedents and Consequences of Community Engagement Strategy. [REVIEW]Frances Bowen, Aloysius Newenham-Kahindi & Irene Herremans - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):297 - 318.
    Understanding firms' interfaces with the community has become a familiar strategic concern for both firms and non-profit organizations. However, it is still not clear when different community engagement strategies are appropriate or how such strategies might benefit the firm and community. In this review, we examine when, how and why firms benefit from community engagement strategies through a systematic review of over 200 academic and practitioner knowledge sources on the antecedents and consequences of community engagement strategy. We analytically describe evidence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  45.  23
    Respecting the Living Means Respecting the Dead Too.Sheelagh McGuinness & Margaret Brazier - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (2):297-316.
    Why should we respect the wishes which individuals may have about how their body is treated after death? Reflecting on how and why the law respects the bodies of the living, we argue that we must also respect the ‘dead’. We contest the relevance of the argument ‘the dead have no interests’, rather we think that the pertinent argument is ‘the living have interests in what happens to their dead bodies’. And, we advance arguments why we should also respect the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46.  14
    [Book Review] Morality, Mortality. [REVIEW]Frances Myrna Kamm - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (1).
  47.  11
    Moral Disengagement and Children’s Propensity to Tell Coached Lies.Frances Lee Doyle & Kay Bussey - 2018 - Journal of Moral Education 47 (1):91-103.
    This study investigated the relationship between children’s proneness to endorse moral disengagement mechanisms and their anticipated antisocial lie telling. Participants were 107 predominantly white Australian children in Grade 1 and Grade 4. Children completed a lie-telling moral disengagement scale and two vignettes. In the first vignette, a child character witnessed a transgression and was coached to say that they did not see the transgression occur. In the second vignette, a child character did not witness a transgression and was coached to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  92
    Harming, Not Aiding, and Positive Rights.Frances Myrna Kamm - 1986 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (1):3-32.
  49.  46
    Ethics Education, Television, and Invisible Nurses.Frances Rieth Ward - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (12):15.
  50. Philosophical Renegades.Bryan Frances - 2013 - In Jennifer Lackey & David Christensen (eds.), The Epistemology of Disagreement: New Essays. Oxford University Press. pp. 121-166.
    If you retain your belief upon learning that a large number and percentage of your recognized epistemic superiors disagree with you, then what happens to the epistemic status of your belief? I investigate that theoretical question as well has the applied case of philosophical disagreement—especially disagreement regarding purely philosophical error theories, theories that do not have much empirical support and that reject large swaths of our most commonsensical beliefs. I argue that even if all those error theories are false, either (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 998