Results for 'Elder, John'

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  1. Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic.Joseph D. John - 2007 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.
  2. The Elder of Ephesus and the Elder John.B. W. Bacon - 1927 - Hibbert Journal 26:112.
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  3. The Mythical "Elder John" of Ephesus.B. W. Bacon - 1930 - Hibbert Journal 29:312.
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  4.  19
    The Plagiarism of the Heathens Detected: John Wood, the Elder (1704–1754) on the Translation of Architecture and Empire.Edward A. Eigen - 2009 - Journal of the History of Ideas 70 (3):375-397.
  5.  5
    The Gospel of Matthew, John the Elder and the Papias Tradition: A Response to R H Gundry.David C. Sim - 2007 - Hts Theological Studies 63 (1).
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  6.  5
    JOHN F. HEALY, Pliny the Elder on Science and Technology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. Pp. Xv+467. ISBN 0-19-814687-6. £65.00. [REVIEW]Aude Doody - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Science 37 (3):345-346.
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  7.  1
    John F. Healy. Pliny the Elder on Science and Technology. Xvi + 467 Pp., Bibl., Indexes.New York/Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. $110. [REVIEW]Roger French - 2002 - Isis 93 (1):103-103.
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  8.  57
    Anti-Dualism in History and Nature: A Study Between John Dewey and José Ortega y Gasset.Marnie Binder - 2010 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (1):44-64.
    This paper argues that a principle manner in which Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset’s historicist maxim ’man has no nature, what he has is history’ can be understood is through a pragmatist basis of anti-dualism, in part inherited from American philosopher John Dewey. The thesis here is that it is not that man has no nature, per se, rather that history is his nature because the two are anti-dualistic concepts; history is our nature because it is comprised of, (...)
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  9. Every Thing Must Go * by James Ladyman and Don Ross with David Spurrett and John Collier.S. R. Allen - 2009 - Analysis 69 (3):565-567.
    Wisely, the authors begin this book by describing it as a polemic. They argue that most contemporary analytic metaphysics is a waste of time and resources since contemporary ‘neo-scholastic’ metaphysical theorizing cannot hope to attain objective truth given its penchant for making a priori claims about the nature of the world which are backed up by appeal to intuition. In engaging in this activity, metaphysicians have, the authors claim, abandoned hope of locating any interesting connection between their metaphysical pronouncements and (...)
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  10.  12
    C. T. Allmand, Lancastrian Normandy, 1415–1450: The History of a Medieval Occupation. New York: Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press, 1983. Pp. Xiii, 349; Map. $47.50.A. J. Pollard, John Talbot and the War in France, 1427–1453. (Studies in History, 35.) London: Royal Historical Society; Atlantic Highlands, N.J.: Humanities Press, 1983. Pp. Xiv, 166; 2 Maps and Black-and-White Frontispiece. $30.25. [REVIEW]A. Elder - 1985 - Speculum 60 (4):939-941.
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  11.  7
    Human Fertility Control: Theory and Practice. By D.F. Hawkins and M.G. Elder, (with Contributions by Zara Whitworth and Jack Parsons). Pp. 483. (Butterworths, London, 1979.) Price £21.00. [REVIEW]John McEwan - 1980 - Journal of Biosocial Science 12 (3):369-371.
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    John Talbot and the War in France, 1427–1453. [REVIEW]A. Elder - 1985 - Speculum 60 (4):939-941.
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  13.  8
    A Common Faith. By John Dewey , Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus, in Columbia University. (New Haven: Yale University Press; London: Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press. 1934. Pp. 87. Price $1.50; 7s. Net.). [REVIEW]A. E. Elder - 1935 - Philosophy 10 (38):235-.
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  14.  3
    The Elder Pliny. [REVIEW]John Healy - 1994 - The Chesterton Review 44 (1):54-56.
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  15. Innovation in Early Humanist Rhetoric-the Oratory of Vergerio, Pier, Paolo the Elder.John M. McManamon - 1982 - Rinascimento 22:3-32.
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  16. The Elder Statesman.Leslie Paul - 1954 - Bulletin of the John Rylands Library 36.
     
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  17. Is There a Duty to Die?: And Other Essays in Bio-Ethics.John Hardwig - 2000 - Routledge.
    Amid the controversies surrounding physician-assisted suicides, euthanasia, and long-term care for the elderly, a major component in the ethics of medicine is notably absent: the rights and welfare of the survivor's family, for whom serious illness and death can be emotionally and financially devastating. In this collection of eight provocative and timely essays, John Hardwig sets forth his views on the need to replace patient-centered bioethics with family-centered bioethics. Starting with a critique of the awkward language with which philosphers (...)
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  18.  10
    Training in Research Ethics and Standards for Community Health Workers andPromotoresEngaged in Latino Health Research.Camille Nebeker, Michael Kalichman, Ana Talavera & John Elder - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (4):20-27.
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  19. Belief in God in the 20th Century.John Elder - 1982 - Available From R.R. Elder.
  20.  5
    Pilgrimage to Vallombrosa: From Vermont to Italy in the Footsteps of George Perkins Marsh.John Elder - 2006 - University of Virginia Press.
    Marrying the map -- Headwaters -- Compatriots -- Saint Beech -- After olive picking -- Hunter in the sky -- Gifts of prophecy -- The broken sheepfold -- Mowing -- Dust of snow -- Inheriting Mount Tom -- Forever wild again -- Into the wind -- Maggie Brook.
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  21. Spirit and Nature: Visions of Interdependence: With an Introductory Essay.Steven C. Rockefeller & John Elder (eds.) - 1990 - Christian A. Johnson Memorial Gallery, Middlebury College.
     
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  22. John Clarke of Hull's Argument for Psychological Egoism.John J. Tilley - 2015 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (1):69-89.
    John Clarke of Hull, one of the eighteenth century's staunchest proponents of psychological egoism, defended that theory in his Foundation of Morality in Theory and Practice. He did so mainly by opposing the objections to egoism in the first two editions of Francis Hutcheson's Inquiry into Virtue. But Clarke also produced a challenging, direct argument for egoism which, regrettably, has received virtually no scholarly attention. In this paper I give it some of the attention it merits. In addition to (...)
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  23. Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke on Desire and Self-Interest.John J. Tilley - 2019 - The European Legacy 24 (1): 1-24.
    Among the most animating debates in eighteenth-century British ethics was the debate over psychological egoism, the view that our most basic desires are self-interested. An important episode in that debate, less well known than it should be, was the exchange between Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke of Hull. In the early editions of his Inquiry into Virtue, Hutcheson argued ingeniously against psychological egoism; in his Foundation of Morality, Clarke argued ingeniously against Hutcheson’s arguments. Later, Hutcheson attempted new arguments against (...)
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  24. The Political Thought of John Locke: An Historical Account of the Argument of the 'Two Treatises of Government'.John Dunn - 1969 - London: Cambridge University Press.
    This study provides a comprehensive reinterpretation of the meaning of Locke's political thought. John Dunn restores Locke's ideas to their exact context, and so stresses the historical question of what Locke in the Two Treatises of Government was intending to claim. By adopting this approach, he reveals the predominantly theological character of all Locke's thinking about politics and provides a convincing analysis of the development of Locke's thought. In a polemical concluding section, John Dunn argues that liberal and (...)
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  25.  60
    Rock and Roll Grist for the John Stuart Mill.John Edward Huss - manuscript
    Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards has argued that rock and roll happens from the neck down. In this contribution to The Rolling Stones and Philosophy, edited by Luke Dick and George Reisch, I draw on neuroscience to argue that, in the parlance of John Stuart Mill, rock and roll is both a higher and a lower pleasure.
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  26. Francis Hutcheson and John Clarke: Self-Interest, Desire, and Divine Impassibility.John J. Tilley - 2017 - International Philosophical Quarterly 57 (3):315-330.
    In this article I address a puzzle about one of Francis Hutcheson’s objections to psychological egoism. The puzzle concerns his premise that God receives no benefit from rewarding the virtuous. Why, in the early editions of his Inquiry Concerning Virtue, does Hutcheson leave this premise undefended? And why, in the later editions, does he continue to do so, knowing that in 1726 John Clarke of Hull had subjected the premise to plausible criticism, geared to the very audience for whom (...)
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  27. Direct Realism with and Without Representation: John Buridan and Durand of St.-Pourçain on Species.Peter Hartman - 2017 - In Gyula Klima (ed.), Questions on the soul by John Buridan and others. Berlin, Germany: Springer. pp. 107-129.
    As we now know, most, if not all, philosophers in the High Middle Ages agreed that what we immediately perceive are external objects and that the immediate object of perception must not be some image present to the mind. Yet most — but not all — philosophers in the High Middle Ages also held, following Aristotle, that perception is a process wherein the percipient takes on the likeness of the external object. This likeness — called a species — is a (...)
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  28.  71
    Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity, by John Greco. [REVIEW]John Turri - 2012 - Mind 121 (481):183-187.
  29. The Philosophy of John Dewey.John Dewey & John J. McDermott - 1973 - University of Chicago Press.
    This is an extensive anthology of the writings of John Dewey, edited by John J. McDermott.
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  30. John Locke: Resistance, Religion, and Responsibility.John Marshall - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    A major account of the development of the political, religious, social and moral thought of John Locke.
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  31.  64
    An Analysis of Properties in John Heil’s "From an Ontological Point of View".Sharon R. Ford - 2007 - In Giacomo Romano (ed.), Symposium on: John Heil, From an Ontological Point of View. Bari: Swif. pp. 45-51.
    In this paper I argue that the requirement for the qualitative is theory-dependent, determined by the fundamental assumptions built into the ontology. John Heil’s qualitative, in its role as individuator of objects and powers, is required only by a theory that posits a world of distinct objects or powers. Does Heil’s ‘deep’ view of the world, such that there is only one powerful object require the qualitative as individuator of objects and powers? The answer depends on whether it is (...)
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  32.  82
    The Politics of Yhwh: John Howard Yoder's Old Testament Narration and its Implications for Social Ethics.John C. Nugent - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (1):71-99.
    The apparent tension between the moral codes of the Old and New Testaments constitutes a perennial problem for Christian ethics. Scholars who have taken this problem seriously have often done so in ways that presume sharp discontinuity between the Testaments. They then proceed to devise a system for identifying what is or is not relevant today, or what pertains to this or that particular social sphere. John Howard Yoder brings fresh perspectives to this perennial problem by refuting the presumption (...)
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  33. John Locke and Christianity: Contemporary Responses to the Reasonableness of Christianity.Victor Nuovo & John Locke (eds.) - 1997 - Thoemmes Press.
    The Reasonableness of Christianity is a major work by one of the greatest modern philosophers. Published anonymously in 1695, it entered a world upset by fierce theological conflict and immediately became a subject of controversy. At issue were the author’s intentions. John Edwards labelled it a Socinian work and charged that it was subversive not only of Christianity but of religion itself others praised it as a sure preservative of both. Few understood Locke’s intentions, and perhaps no one fully. (...)
     
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  34. Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris.Thomas Douglas - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing about (...)
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  35. John Dewey and Moral Imagination: Pragmatism in Ethics.Steven Fesmire - 2003 - Indiana University Press.
    While examining the important role of imagination in making moral judgments, John Dewey and Moral Imagination focuses new attention on the relationship between American pragmatism and ethics. Steven Fesmire takes up threads of Dewey's thought that have been largely unexplored and elaborates pragmatism's distinctive contribution to understandings of moral experience, inquiry, and judgment. Building on two Deweyan notions—that moral character, belief, and reasoning are part of a social and historical context and that moral deliberation is an imaginative, dramatic rehearsal (...)
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  36. El legado feminista de John Dewey.Marta Vaamonde Gamo & Jaime Nubiola - 2016 - Espacio, Tiempo y Educación 3 (2):281-300.
    This article shows how feminism welcomed and was influenced by the pragmatism of John Dewey. While in real terms his impact on European feminism has been minimal, this was not the case in contemporary America. In this article we study both how Dewey’s ideas were received amongst American feminists, as well as certain aspects of his thinking that could be enormously useful in present-day debates between critical and postmodern feminists. We compare the Deweyan and feminist arguments against the traditional (...)
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  37. John Dewey and the High Tide of American Liberalism.Alan Ryan - 1995 - W.W. Norton.
    "When John Dewey died in 1952, he was memorialized as America's most famous philosopher, revered by liberal educators and deplored by conservatives, but universally acknowledged as his country's intellectual voice. Many things conspired to give Dewey an extraordinary intellectual eminence: He was immensely long-lived and immensely prolific; he died in his ninety-third year, and his intellectual productivity hardly slackened until his eighties." "Professor Alan Ryan offers new insights into Dewey's many achievements, his character, and the era in which his (...)
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  38.  55
    James M. Buchanan, John Rawls, and Democratic Governance.S. M. Amadae - 2011 - In Robert Cavelier (ed.), Approaching Deliberative Democracy. Pittsburgh, PA, USA: pp. 31-52.
    This article compares James M. Buchanan's and John Rawls's theories of democratic governance. In particular it compares their positions on the characteristics of a legitimate social contract. Where Buchanan argues that additional police force can be used to quell political demonstrations, Rawls argues for a social contract that meets the difference principle.
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  39. John Stuart Mill on Luck and Distributive Justice.Piers Norris Turner - 2019 - In Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Psychology of Luck. pp. 80-93.
    My aim in this chapter is to place John Stuart Mill’s distinctive utilitarian political philosophy in the context of the debate about luck, responsibility, and equality. I hope it will reveal the extent to which his utilitarianism provides a helpful framework for synthesizing the competing claims of luck and relational egalitarianism. I attempt to show that when Mill’s distributive justice commitments are not decided by direct appeal to overall happiness, they are guided by three main public principles: an impartiality (...)
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  40. John Cage, Gilles Deleuze, and the Idea of Sound.Iain Campbell - 2017 - Parallax 23 (3):361-378.
    In this essay we will take the American experimental composer John Cage’s understanding of sound as the starting point for an evaluation of that term in the field of sound studies. Drawing together two of the most influential figures in the field, Cage’s thought and work will serve as a lens through which to engage with recent debate concerning the uptake in sound studies of the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. In so doing we will attempt to develop a path (...)
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  41.  91
    John Stuart Mill.John Skorupski - 1989 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  42. Narrow Content, by Juhani Yli-Vakkuri and John Hawthorne. [REVIEW]Sarah Sawyer - 2019 - Mind 128 (511):976-984.
    This is an extended review of Juhani Yli-Vakkuri & John Hawthorne's book: Narrow Content (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018)..
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  43. Sprawiedliwość a prawo w nauczaniu Jana Pawła II [Justice and Law in the Teaching of John Paul II].Marek Piechowiak - 2014 - Przegląd Tomistyczny 20:209-237.
    The contribution focuses on philosophical issues of justice of positive law in the light of the social teaching of John Paul II. The analyses start with consideration of anthropological foundations of justice as virtue, develop with the reflexion upon justice of actions realizing justice and finally arrive at examination of the criteria of justice of law. -/- It is argued that relations between a human being and goods (ends of actions) form ontological basis of natural law and justice of (...)
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  44.  16
    John Mcdowell.Tim Thornton - 2004 - Routledge.
    John McDowell's contribution to philosophy has ranged across Greek philosophy, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and ethics. His writings have drawn on the works of, amongst others, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Davidson. His contributions have made him one of the most widely read, discussed and challenging philosophers writing today. This book provides a careful account of the main claims that McDowell advances in a number of different areas of philosophy. The interconnections between the (...)
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  45. John Dewey’s Logic of Science.Matthew J. Brown - 2012 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):258-306.
    In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey's work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey's work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing ``science in practice.'' The core of Dewey's philosophy of science is his (...)
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  46. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word.Scott M. Williams - 2010 - Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the (...)
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  47. La Logique Symbolique En Débat À Oxford À la Fin du XIXe Siècle : Les Disputes Logiques de Lewis Carroll Et John Cook Wilson.Mathieu Marion & Amirouche Moktefi - 2014 - Revue D’Histoire des Sciences 67 (2):185-205.
    The development of symbolic logic is often presented in terms of a cumulative story of consecutive innovations that led to what is known as modern logic. This narrative hides the difficulties that this new logic faced at first, which shaped its history. Indeed, negative reactions to the emergence of the new logic in the second half of the nineteenth century were numerous and we study here one case, namely logic at Oxford, where one finds Lewis Carroll, a mathematical teacher who (...)
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  48.  69
    John Dewey : Rethinking Our Time.Raymond D. Boisvert - 1998 - State University of New York Press.
    ISBN 0-7914-3529-6 (hard : alk. paper). — ISBN 0-7914-3530-X (pbk. : alk. paper ) 1. Dewey, John, 1854-1952. I. Title. II. Series: SUNY series in philosophy of education. B945.D4B65 1997 191— dc 21 96-52291 CIP 10 987654321 For Jayne ...
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  49. Creations of the Mind: Theories of Artifacts and Their Representaion.Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (eds.) - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Creations of the Mind presents sixteen original essays by theorists from a wide variety of disciplines who have a shared interest in the nature of artifacts and their implications for the human mind. All the papers are written specially for this volume, and they cover a broad range of topics concerned with the metaphysics of artifacts, our concepts of artifacts and the categories that they represent, the emergence of an understanding of artifacts in infants' cognitive development, as well as the (...)
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  50. Two Peas in a Single Polytheistic Pod: Richard Swinburne and John Hick.Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41 (Supplement):17-32.
    A descriptive polytheist thinks there are at least two gods. John Hick and Richard Swinburne are descriptive polytheists. In this respect, they are like Thomas Aquinas and many other theists. What sets Swinburne and Hick apart from Aquinas, however, is that unlike him they are normative polytheists. That is, Swinburne and Hick think that it is right that we, or at least some of us, worship more than one god. However, the evidence available to me shows that only Swinburne, (...)
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