Results for 'Ray S. Jackendoff'

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  1. Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution.Ray Jackendoff - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Already hailed as a masterpiece, Foundations of Language offers a brilliant overhaul of the last thirty-five years of research in generative linguistics and related fields. "Few books really deserve the cliché 'this should be read by every researcher in the field'," writes Steven Pinker, author of The Language Instinct, "but Ray Jackendoff's Foundations of Language does." Foundations of Language offers a radically new understanding of how language, the brain, and perception intermesh. The book renews the promise of early generative (...)
     
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  2. Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution.Ray Jackendoff - 2002 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Presenting a landmark in linguistics and cognitive science, Ray Jackendoff proposes a new holistic theory of the relation between the sounds, structure, and meaning of language and their relation to mind and brain. Foundations of Language exhibits the most fundamental new thinking in linguistics since Noam Chomsky's Aspects of the Theory of Syntax in 1965—yet is readable, stylish, and accessible to a wide readership. Along the way it provides new insights on the evolution of language, thought, and communication.
     
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  3. The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It?Ray Jackendoff & Steven Pinker - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2):201-236.
    We examine the question of which aspects of language are uniquely human and uniquely linguistic in light of recent suggestions by Hauser, Chomsky, and Fitch that the only such aspect is syntactic recursion, the rest of language being either specific to humans but not to language (e.g. words and concepts) or not specific to humans (e.g. speech perception). We find the hypothesis problematic. It ignores the many aspects of grammar that are not recursive, such as phonology, morphology, case, agreement, and (...)
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  4. Semantic Structures.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1990 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Semantic Structures is a large-scale study of conceptual structure and its lexical and syntactic expression in English that builds on the theory of Conceptual...
  5. Semantics And Cognition.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1983 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    This book emphasizes the role of semantics as a bridge between the theory of language and the theories of other cognitive capacities such as visual perception...
  6. A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Ray Jackendoff - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A profoundly arresting integration of the faculties of the mind - of how we think, speak, and see the world. Written with an informality that belies the originality of its insights and the radical nature of its conclusions this is the author's most important book since his groundbreaking Foundations of Language in 2002.
     
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  7. Semantic Interpretation in Generative Grammar.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1975 - Foundations of Language 12 (4):561-582.
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  8. Patterns in the Mind: Language and Human Nature.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1994 - New York: Basic Books.
  9. A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Ray Jackendoff - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    A profoundly arresting integration of the faculties of the mind - of how we think, speak, and see the world. Written with an informality that belies the originality of its insights and the radical nature of its conclusions, this is the author's most important book since his groundbreaking Foundations of Language in 2002.
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  10. How Language Helps Us Think.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):1-34.
    On formal and empirical grounds, the overt form of language cannot be the vehicle that the mind uses for reasoning. Nevertheless, we most frequently experience our thought as "inner speech". It is argued that inner speech aids thought by providing a "handle " for attention, making it possible to pay attention to relational and abstract aspects of thought, and thereby to process them with greater richness. Organisms lacking language have no modality of experience that provides comparable articulation of thought; hence (...)
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  11. Locating Meaning in the Mind (Where It Belongs).Ray S. Jackendoff - 2006 - In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Blackwell.
  12. Coercion in on-Line Semantic Processing.Brian McElree, Matthew J. Traxler, Martin J. Pickering, Ray S. Jackendoff & Rachel E. Seely - 2001 - Cognition 78:B17 - B25.
     
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  13.  31
    An Interpretive Theory of Negation.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1969 - Foundations of Language 5 (2):218-241.
  14.  18
    Quantifiers in English.Ray S. Jackendoff - 1968 - Foundations of Language 4 (4):422-442.
  15.  10
    A Reconsideration of Dative Movements.Ray S. Jackendoff & Peter Culicover - 1971 - Foundations of Language 7 (3):397-412.
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  16.  66
    Unconscious, Yes; Homunculus,???Ray S. Jackendoff - 2000 - Neuro-Psychoanalysis 2 (1):17-20.
  17.  38
    The Capacity for Music: What is It, and What’s Special About It?Ray Jackendoff & Fred Lerdahl - 2006 - Cognition 100 (1):33-72.
  18.  21
    What's Special About the Human Language Faculty?Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Cognition 95 (2).
  19. The Capacity for Music: What's Special About It.Fred Lerdahl & Ray Jackendoff - 2006 - Cognition 100 (1):33-72.
     
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  20.  51
    Contrastive Focus Reduplication in English (the Salad-Salad Paper).Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    This paper presents a phenomenon of colloquial English that we call Contrastive Reduplication (CR), involving the copying of words and sometimes phrases as in It’s tuna salad, not SALAD-salad, or Do you LIKE-HIM-like him? Drawing on a corpus of examples gathered from natural speech, written texts, and television scripts, we show that CR restricts the interpretation of the copied element to a ‘real’ or prototypical reading. Turning to the structural properties of the construction, we show that CR is unusual among (...)
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  21.  18
    Satyajit Ray on Cinema.Satyajit Ray & Shyam Benegal - 2013 - Columbia University Press.
    Spanning forty years of Ray's career, these essays, for the first time collected in one volume, present the filmmaker's reflections on the art and craft of the cinematic medium and include his thoughts on sentimentalism, mass culture, ...
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  22.  17
    Campbell's Blind Variation in the Evolution of an Ideology and Popper's World 3.S. Ray - 1997 - Philosophica 60 (2):113-154.
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  23. Simpler Syntax.Peter W. Culicover & Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This groundbreaking book offers a new and compelling perspective on the structure of human language. The fundamental issue it addresses is the proper balance between syntax and semantics, between structure and derivation, and between rule systems and lexicon. It argues that the balance struck by mainstream generative grammar is wrong. It puts forward a new basis for syntactic theory, drawing on a wide range of frameworks, and charts new directions for research. In the past four decades, theories of syntactic structure (...)
     
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  24. The Nature of the Language Faculty and its Implications for Evolution of Language (Reply to Fitch, Hauser, and Chomsky).Ray Jackendoff - 2005 - Cognition 97 (2):211-225.
    In a continuation of the conversation with Fitch, Chomsky, and Hauser on the evolution of language, we examine their defense of the claim that the uniquely human, language-specific part of the language faculty (the “narrow language faculty”) consists only of recursion, and that this part cannot be considered an adaptation to communication. We argue that their characterization of the narrow language faculty is problematic for many reasons, including its dichotomization of cognitive capacities into those that are utterly unique and those (...)
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  25.  24
    Ray Jackendoff's Phenomenology of Language as a Refutation of the 'Appendage' Theory of Consciousness.Ralph D. Ellis - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):125-137.
    Since Jackendoff has shown that language facilitates abstract and complex thought by making possible subtle manipulations of the focus of attention, and since the kind of attention relevant here is attention to aspects of intentional objects in conscious awareness, it follows that the abstract and complex thinking that language facilitates owes much to the working of a conscious process. This, however, conflicts with Jackendoff's view of consciousness as something which does not play a direct part in thinking, but (...)
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  26.  63
    The Reality of a Universal Language Faculty.Steven Pinker & Ray Jackendoff - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):465-466.
    While endorsing Evans & Levinson's (E&L's) call for rigorous documentation of variation, we defend the idea of Universal Grammar as a toolkit of language acquisition mechanisms. The authors exaggerate diversity by ignoring the space of conceivable but nonexistent languages, trivializing major design universals, conflating quantitative with qualitative variation, and assuming that the utility of a linguistic feature suffices to explain how children acquire it.
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  27. Précis of Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution,.Ray Jackendoff - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):651-665.
    The goal of this study is to reintegrate the theory of generative grammar into the cognitive sciences. Generative grammar was right to focus on the child's acquisition of language as its central problem, leading to the hypothesis of an innate Universal Grammar. However, generative grammar was mistaken in assuming that the syntactic component is the sole course of combinatoriality, and that everything else is “interpretive.” The proper approach is a parallel architecture, in which phonology, syntax, and semantics are autonomous generative (...)
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  28.  88
    Your Theory of Language Evolution Depends on Your Theory of Language.Ray Jackendoff - unknown
    language to explain, and I want to show how this depends on what you think language is. So, what is language? Everybody recognizes that language is partly culturally dependent: there is a huge variety of disparate languages in the world, passed down through cultural transmission. If that’s all there is to language, a theory of the evolution of language has nothing at all to explain. We need only explain the cultural evolution of languages: English, Dutch, Mandarin, Hausa, etc. are products (...)
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  29. Review of Ray S. Jackendoff's Languages of the Mind: Essays on Mental Representation. [REVIEW]T. Stevens & A. Karmiloff-Smith - 1994 - Philosophical Psychology 7:405-405.
  30.  4
    Ray Jackendoff's Phenomenology of Language as a Refutation of the 'Appendage' Theory of Consciousness.Ralph Ellis - 1995 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):125-137.
    Since Jackendoff has shown that language facilitates abstract and complex thought by making possible subtle manipulations of the focus of attention, and since the kind of attention relevant here is attention to aspects of intentional objects in conscious awareness, it follows that the abstract and complex thinking that language facilitates owes much to the working of a conscious process. This, however, conflicts with Jackendoff's view of consciousness as something which does not play a direct part in thinking, but (...)
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  31. Motivation's Pick-Me-Upper: Enhancing Performance Through Motivation-Enhancing Drugs.Keisha Shantel Ray - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 6 (1):50-51.
    Torben Kjærsgaard’s argues that the term “cognitive enhancement substances” is an inappropriate term considering that stimulants do not enhance cognition, but rather only enhance motivation. Therefore, he concludes that stimulants are best described as “performance maintenance” and not “performance enhancement.” I challenge his conclusion on the grounds that both life’s ordinary, daily activities and life’s extraordinary activities are types of performances necessary for living the kinds of lives that we want to live, which can be enhanced, not just maintained, with (...)
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  32. Rethinking Polanyi’s Concept of Tacit Knowledge: From Personal Knowing to Imagined Institutions. [REVIEW]Tim Ray - 2009 - Minerva 47 (1):75-92.
    Half a century after Michael Polanyi conceptualised ‘the tacit component’ in personal knowing, management studies has reinvented ‘tacit knowledge’—albeit in ways that squander the advantages of Polanyi’s insights and ignore his faith in ‘spiritual reality’. While tacit knowing challenged the absurdities of sheer objectivity, expressed in a ‘perfect language’, it fused rational knowing, based on personal experience, with mystical speculation about an un-experienced ‘external reality’. Faith alone saved Polanyi’s model from solipsism. But Ernst von Glasersfeld’s radical constructivism provides scope to (...)
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  33.  64
    Williamson's Master Argument on Vagueness.Greg Ray - 2004 - Synthese 138 (2):175-206.
    According to Timothy Williamson 's epistemic view, vague predicates have precise extensions, we just don't know where their boundaries lie. It is a central challenge to his view to explain why we would be so ignorant, if precise borderlines were really there. He offers a novel argument to show that our insuperable ignorance ``is just what independently justified epistemic principles would lead one to expect''. This paper carefully formulates and critically examines Williamson 's argument. It is shown that the argument (...)
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  34. Tarski's Grelling and the T-Strategy.Greg Ray - 2006 - In Bryson Brown (ed.), Truth and Probability: Essays in Honour of Hugues Leblanc. College Publications.
    Tarski's argumentative use of the liar paradox is well-known, but officially it is the Grelling paradox that has final pride of place in Tarski's argument, not the Liar at all. Tarski explicitly gives argumentation that adverts to the liar argument, but it is an alternative argument—one he only hints at and which adverts to the Grelling—which he says has the advantage of removing any empirical element. In this paper, we will examine how the Grelling might be used in place of (...)
     
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  35.  4
    Ray Jackendoff's Phenomenology of Language as a Refutation of the 'Appendage' Theory of Consciousness.Ralph D. Ellis - 1996 - Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):125-137.
  36.  19
    A User’s Guide to Thought & Meaning by Ray Jackendoff.Nikki Dekker - 2013 - Philosophy Now 94:43-43.
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  37.  7
    A User’s Guide to Thought and Meaning by Ray Jackendoff.Joško Žanić - 2013 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):129-134.
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  38.  3
    A Mixed Treatment of Categoricity and Regularity: Solutions That Don't Do Justice to a Well-Exposed Complexity. Commentary to Ray Jackendoff's Foundations for Language.René-Joseph Lavie - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26.
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  39. Ray Jackendoff, A User's Guide to Thought and Meaning.Joško Žanić - 2013 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 37:129-134.
     
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  40. The Faculty of Language: What's Special About It?/Steven Pinker, Ray Jackendoff.Pinker St - 2005 - Cognition 95:201-236.
     
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  41.  37
    The Cosmological Constant: Einstein's Greatest Mistake?Christopher Ray - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (4):589.
  42.  6
    Motivated Shortcomings in Explanation: The Role of Comparative Self-Evaluation and Awareness of Explanation Recipient's Knowledge.Devin G. Ray, Josephine Neugebauer, Kai Sassenberg, Jürgen Buder & Friedrich W. Hesse - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (2):445.
  43.  14
    The Women's Movement in India Today-New Agendas and Old ProblemsThe History of Doing: An Illustrated Account of Movements for Women's Rights and Feminism in India, 1800-1990Fields of Protest: Women's Movements in IndiaReinventing Revolution: New Social Movements and the Socialist Tradition in IndiaTwo Faces of Protest: Contrasting Modes of Women's Activism in IndiaWomen and Right-Wing Movements: Indian Experiences. [REVIEW]U. Kalpagam, Radha Kumar, Raka Ray, Gail Omvedt, Amrita Basu, Tanika Sarkar & Urvashi Butalia - 2000 - Feminist Studies 26 (3):645.
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  44.  33
    Interpreting Russell’s Gray’s Elegy Argument.Nicholas Ray - 2012 - Dialogue 51 (4):667-682.
    is central to the analytic tradition, yet one of its key arguments (the Grays new semantic theory.
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  45.  8
    Supersession and the Subject: A Reconsideration of Stanley Fish's "Affective Stylistics".William Ray - 1978 - Diacritics 8 (3):60.
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  46.  36
    Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion. By Julian Young�The Shadow of the Anti-Christ: Nietzsche's Critique of Christianity. By Stephen N. Williams. [REVIEW]Matthew Ray - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (2):346-347.
  47.  11
    Bede's Vera Lex Historiae.Roger Ray - 1980 - Speculum 55 (1):1-21.
    Toward the end of the epistolary preface to the Historia ecclesiastica, Bede asked that none blame him should the narrative contain errors, for he had tried to instruct posterity by setting down, according to what he calls “vera lex historiae,” things collected from common report.
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  48.  13
    Frege's Difficulties with Identity.Robert Ray - 1977 - Philosophical Studies 31 (4):219 - 234.
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  49.  13
    Kierkegaard's Concept of Existence. By Gregor Malantschuk, Edited and Translated by Howard V. Hong and Edna H. Hong.M. Ray - 2007 - Heythrop Journal 48 (1):155–156.
  50.  5
    Aesthetics of Ancient Indian Sylvan Colonies and Gardens: Tagore's Reflexions.Sitansu Ray - 2003 - Analecta Husserliana 78:151-162.
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