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  1. Optimizing Individual and Collective Reliability: A Puzzle.Marc-Kevin Daoust - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):516-531.
    Many epistemologists have argued that there is some degree of independence between individual and collective reliability (e.g., Kitcher 1990; Mayo-Wilson, Zollman, and Danks 2011; Dunn 2018). The question, then, is: To what extent are the two independent of each other? And in which contexts do they come apart? In this paper, I present a new case confirming the independence between individual and collective reliability optimization. I argue that, in voting groups, optimizing individual reliability can conflict with optimizing collective reliability. This (...)
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  2. Collective Virtue Epistemology and the Value of Identity Diversity.Brian Kim - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):486-501.
    Discussions of diversity tend to paint a mixed picture of the practical and epistemic value of diversity. While there are expansive and detailed accounts of the value of cognitive diversity, explorations of identity diversity typically focus on its value as a source or cause of cognitive diversity. The resulting picture on which identity diversity only possesses a derivative practical and epistemic value is unsatisfactory and fails to account for some of its central epistemic benefits. In response, I propose that collective (...)
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  3.  7
    Epistemic Actions, Abilities and Knowing-How: A Non-Reductive Account.Seumas Miller - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):466-485.
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  4.  13
    Climate Change and Culpable Ignorance: The Case of Pseudoscience.Francesca Pongiglione & Carlo Martini - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):425-435.
  5.  2
    What Composition of High-Energy Physics Collaborations is Epistemically Optimal?Vitaly Pronskikh - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):502-515.
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  6.  4
    Policy Styles and Epistemic Policies in the Regulation of Health Claims. A Comparison of Europe, the United States, and Japan.Noemí Sanz Merino - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):449-465.
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  7.  9
    In-Between: The Simultaneity of the Non-Simultaneous.Nico Stehr - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):407-424.
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  8. On Social Robustness Checks on Science: What Climate Policymakers Can Learn From Population Control.Li-an Yu - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (4):436-448.
    In this paper, I provide policymakers, who rely on science to address their missions, with two arguments for improving science for social benefits. I argue for a refined concept of social robustness that can distinguish socially appropriate cases of political reliance on science from inappropriate ones. Both of the constituents are essential for evaluating the social suitability of science-relevant policy or action. Using four cases of population control, I show that socially inappropriate political reliance on science can make science epistemically (...)
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  9.  92
    Why Trust Raoult? How Social Indicators Inform the Reputations of Experts.T. Y. Branch, Gloria Origgi & Tiffany Morisseau - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):299-316.
    The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the considerable challenge of sourcing expertise and determining which experts to trust. Dissonant information fostered controversy in public discourse and encouraged an appeal to a wide range of social indicators of trustworthiness in order to decide whom to trust. We analyze public discourse on expertise by examining how social indicators inform the reputation of Dr. Didier Raoult, the French microbiologist who rose to international prominence as an early advocate for using hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19. To (...)
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  10.  7
    Is It Conspiracy or ‘Truth’? Examining the Legitimation of the 5G Conspiracy Theory During the Covid-19 Pandemic.Beatriz Buarque - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):317-328.
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  11.  11
    Are ‘Conspiracy Theories’ So Unlikely to Be True? A Critique of Quassim Cassam’s Concept of ‘Conspiracy Theories’.Kurtis Hagen - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):329-343.
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  12.  10
    Multiplying Ignorance, Deferring Action: Dynamics in the Communication of Knowledge and Non-Knowledge.Morten Knudsen & Sharon Kishik - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):344-359.
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  13.  30
    In Trust We Trust: Epistemic Vigilance and Responsibility.Neil Levy - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):283-298.
  14.  4
    Diving Deeper Into the Concept of ‘Cultural Heritage’ and Its Relationship with Epistemic Diversity.Fulvio Mazzocchi - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):393-406.
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  15.  9
    Testimonial Injustice and Prediction Markets.Carl David Mildenberger - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):378-392.
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  16. Reclaiming Control: Extended Mindreading and the Tracking of Digital Footprints.Uwe Peters - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (3):267-282.
    It is well known that on the Internet, computer algorithms track our website browsing, clicks, and search history to infer our preferences, interests, and goals. The nature of this algorithmic tracking remains unclear, however. Does it involve what many cognitive scientists and philosophers call ‘mindreading’, i.e., an epistemic capacity to attribute mental states to people to predict, explain, or influence their actions? Here I argue that it does. This is because humans are in a particular way embedded in the process (...)
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  17.  1
    ‘Give the Money Where It’s Due’: The Impact of Knowledge-Sharing Via Social Media on the Reproduction of the Academic Labourer.Luis Arboledas-Lérida - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):251-266.
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  18.  1
    Nudging Humans.Brett Frischmann - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):129-152.
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  19.  1
    Citizens in Search of Facts: A Case Study From the Oregon Citizens’ Initiative Review on Measure 82.Ekaterina Lukianova & Igor Tolochin - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):180-193.
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  20.  2
    Deontic Binding: Imposed, Voluntary, and Autogenic.Russ McBride - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):218-237.
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  21.  6
    An Epistemic Problem for Epistocracy.María Pía Méndez - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):153-166.
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  22.  1
    On the Importance of Replicating Experiments in Economics.Matteo Migheli - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):238-250.
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  23.  7
    Epistemological Fetishism of a Doctoral Student.Muhalim Muhalim - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):205-217.
  24. A Tension in the Strong Program: The Relation Between the Rational and the Social.Shahram Shahryari - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):194-204.
    Advocating a sociological explanation of scientific knowledge, David Bloor protests against the adherents of the autonomy of knowledge; i.e., those who asymmetrically explain the credibility of theories in the history of science. These philosophers and historians regard the credibility of true and rational theories due to their proper reasons, while accounting for the acceptance of false or irrational beliefs by citing social causes. Bloor assumes that the credibility of all beliefs is socially influenced, and therefore considers all in need of (...)
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  25.  21
    Epistemology and the Pandemic: Lessons From an Epistemic Crisis.Petr Špecián - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):167-179.
    Many democratic countries have failed to stand up to the challenge presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. I argue that the collective response to the pandemic has been incapacitated by an ‘epistemic crisis’, (i.e., a breakdown in the social division of epistemic labor) that led to a failure of citizens’ beliefs to converge towards a shared perception of the situation. Neither a paucity of relevant expert knowledge nor democratic citizens’ irrationality is required for the crisis to emerge. In particular, I highlight (...)
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  26.  2
    Social Exclusion, Epistemic Injustice and Intellectual Self-Trust.Jon Leefmann - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (1):117-127.
    This commentary offers a coherent reading of the papers presented in the special issue ‘Exclusion, Engagement, and Empathy: Reflections on Public Participation in Medicine and Technology’. Focusing on intellectual self-trust it adds a further perspective on the harmful epistemic consequences of social exclusion for individual agents in healthcare contexts. In addition to some clarifications regarding the concepts of ‘intellectual self-trust’ and ‘social exclusion’ the commentary also examines in what ways empathy, engagement and participatory sense-making could help to avoid threats to (...)
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  27.  35
    Relationally Responsive Expert Trustworthiness.Ben Almassi - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36.
    Social epistemologists often operationalize the task of indirectly assessing experts’ trustworthiness to identifying whose beliefs are more reliably true on matters in an area of expertise. Not only does this neglect the philosophically rich space between belief formation and testimonial utterances, it also reduces trustworthiness to reliability. In ethics of trust, by contrast, explicitly relational views of trust include things like good will and responsiveness. One might think that relational aspects can be safely set aside for social epistemology of trust (...)
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  28.  5
    Epistemic Injustice in Late-Stage Dementia: A Case for Non-Verbal Testimonial Injustice.Lucienne Spencer - 2022 - Social Epistemology 1:1-18.
    The literature on epistemic injustice has thus far confined the concept of testimonial injustice to speech expressions such as inquiring, discussing, deliberating, and, above all, telling. I propose that it is time to broaden the horizons of testimonial injustice to include a wider range of expressions. Controversially, the form of communication I have in mind is non-verbal expression. Non-verbal expression is a vital, though often overlooked, form of communication, particularly for people who have certain neurocognitive disorders. Dependency upon non-verbal expression (...)
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  29.  32
    Status Distrust of Scientific Experts.Hugh Desmond - 2022 - Social Epistemology:1-15.
    Distrust in scientific experts can be surprisingly stubborn, persisting despite evidence supporting the experts’ views, demonstrations of their competence, or displays of good will. This stubborn distrust is often viewed as a manifestation of irrationality. By contrast, this article proposes a logic of “status distrust”: low-status individuals are objectively vulnerable to collective decision-making, and can justifiably distrust high-status scientific experts if they are not confident that the experts do not have their best interests at heart. In phenomena of status distrust, (...)
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  30.  5
    How to Fight Linguistic Injustice in Science: Equity Measures and Mitigating Agents.Aleksandra Vučković & Vlasta Sikimić - 2022 - Social Epistemology:1-17.
    Though a common language of science allows for easier communication of the results among researchers, the use of lingua franca also comes with the cost of losing some of the diverse ideas and results arising from the plurality of languages. Following Quine’s famous thesis about the indeterminacy of translation, we elaborate on the inherent loss of diverse ideas when only one language of science is used. Non-native speakers sometimes experience epistemic injustice due to their language proficiency and consequently, their scientific (...)
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