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  1.  41
    Impact of a Participatory Action Approach to Virtue Promotion Among Early Adolescents.Anne Jeffrey, Krista Mehari, Marie Chastang, Megan Blanton & Joseph Currier - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 2023.
    Research on interventions that aim to cultivate character strengths, or virtues, has been conducted primarily among highly resourced, predominantly White communities, and the interventions have been developed to reflect the values of those communities. The purpose of this study was to use a participatory action research approach to develop a virtue intervention focused on addressing the community-identified problem of violence in a predominantly Black community, and to test its effectiveness in a pilot study. Participants were 37 youth (M age = (...)
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  2. How place shapes the aspirations of hope: the allegory of the privileged and the underprivileged.Victor Counted & David A. Newheiser - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 2023.
    We articulate a holistic understanding of hope, going beyond the common conceptualization of hope in terms of positive affect and cognition by considering what hope means for the underprivileged. In the recognition that hope is always situated in a particular place, we explore the perspective of the privileged and the underprivileged, clarifying how spatial contexts shape their goals for the future and their agency toward attaining these goals. Where some people experience precarity due to their disability, race, gender, sexuality, and (...)
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  3.  38
    Transdisciplinary Participatory Action Research: How Philosophers, Psychologists, and Practitioners Can Work Well Together To Promote Adolescent Character Development Within Context.Anne Jeffrey, Krista Mehari, Marie Chastang & Sarah Schnitker - 2023 - Journal of Positive Psychology 18.
    Character strengths research has the potential to imply that youth have character deficits or moral failings that cause their problematic behavior. This ignores the impact of context, especially for youth who are members of historically marginalized groups in under resourced communities. On the other hand, framing youth who are members of underrepresented groups solely as products of oppression undermines their agency and the power of collective action. It may be possible to promote character development in a contextually relevant, culturally grounded (...)
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