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  1.  5
    The Emergence of Statistical Objectivity: Changing Ideas of Epistemic Vice and Virtue in Science.Jeremy Freese & David Peterson - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (3):289-313.
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  2.  3
    Migration-Facilitating Capital: A Bourdieusian Theory of International Migration.Jaeeun Kim - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (3):262-288.
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  3.  2
    The Feminist Question in Realism.Paige L. Sweet - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (3):221-243.
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  4.  3
    Schemas and Frames.Michael Lee Wood, Dustin S. Stoltz, Justin Van Ness & Marshall A. Taylor - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (3):244-261.
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  5.  1
    Pathways to Violence: Dynamics for the Continuation of Large-Scale Conflict.Hrag Balian & Peter Bearman - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):210-220.
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  6. The Structure of Comparison in the Study of Revolution.Colin J. Beck - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):134-161.
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  7.  3
    Insurgencies as Networks of Event Orderings.Ronald L. Breiger & Julia Grace Smith - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):201-209.
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  8.  1
    How Group Events Can Shape Network Processes.Emily Erikson - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):187-193.
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  9. Introduction to Events & Networks Symposium.Emily Erikson - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):185-186.
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  10.  3
    How to Read The Wealth of Nations.Jonathan Hearn - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):162-184.
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  11. Getting Off the Cartesian Clothesline.John Levi Martin - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):194-200.
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  12.  6
    Between Situations: Anticipation, Rhythms, and the Theory of Interaction.Iddo Tavory - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (2):117-133.
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  13.  14
    The Love of Neuroscience: A Sociological Account.Gabriel Abend - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (1):88-116.
    I make a contribution to the sociology of epistemologies by examining the neuroscience literature on love from 2000 to 2016. I find that researchers make consequential assumptions concerning the production or generation of love, its temporality, its individual character, and appropriate control conditions. Next, I consider how to account for these assumptions’ being common in the literature. More generally, I’m interested in the ways in which epistemic communities construe, conceive of, and publicly represent and work with their objects of inquiry—and (...)
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  14.  4
    Toward a Cultural-Structural Theory of Suicide: Examining Excessive Regulation and Its Discontents.Seth Abrutyn & Anna S. Mueller - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (1):48-66.
    Despite its enduring insights, Durkheim’s theory of suicide fails to account for a significant set of cases because of its overreliance on structural forces to the detriment of other possible factors. In this paper, we develop a new theoretical framework for thinking about the role of culture in vulnerability to suicide. We argue that by focusing on the cultural dynamics of excessive regulation, particularly at the meso level, a more robust sociological model for suicide could be offered that supplements structure-heavy (...)
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  15.  2
    Going Out: A Sociology of Public Outings.Michael DeLand & David Trouille - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (1):27-47.
    In this article we propose a framework for description and analysis of public life by treating “outings” as a unit of sociological analysis. Studying outings requires bracketing a concern with bounded places and isolated encounters. Instead, descriptions of outings track people as they organize trips “out,” including their preparations, turning points, and post hoc reflections. We emphasize how people understand and contextualize their time in public by linking situated moments of public life to the outing’s unfolding trajectory and to people’s (...)
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  16.  5
    Beyond Double Movement and Re-Regulation: Polanyi, the Organized Denial of Money Politics, and the Promise of Democratization.Jakob Feinig - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (1):67-87.
    Although Karl Polanyi is best known for his theorization of market regulation and the double movement, democratizing the economic was one of his core concerns. He believed societies need to bring labor, land, and money under collective oversight to displace the logic of market fundamentalism with the logic of human needs. In this article, the author draws on Polanyi’s vocabulary to shed light on the denial of money politics and the possibility of democratization. The author illustrates these dynamics through an (...)
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  17.  7
    The Heterosexual Matrix as Imperial Effect.Vrushali Patil - 2018 - Sociological Theory 36 (1):1-26.
    While Judith Butler’s concept of the heterosexual matrix is dominant in gender and sexuality studies, it is a curiously aspatial and atemporal concept. This paper seeks to re-embed it within space and time by situating its emergence within colonial and imperial histories. Based on this discussion, it ends with three lessons for contemporary work on gender and sexuality and a broader theorization of sex-gender-sexuality regimes beyond the heterosexual matrix.
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