52 found

Year:

  1.  9
    Gifts Without Givers: Secular Spirituality and Metaphorical Cognition.Drew Chastain - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):631-647.
    The option of being ‘spiritual but not religious’ deserves much more philosophical attention. That is the aim here, taking the work of Robert Solomon as a starting point, with focus on the particular issues around viewing life as gift. This requires analysis of ‘existential gratitude’ to show that there can be gratitude for things without gratitude to someone for providing things, and also closer attention to the role that metaphor plays in cognition. I consider two main concerns with gift and (...)
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  2.  9
    Does a Delayed Origin for Biological Life Count as Evidence Against the Existence of God?Travis Dumsday - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):649-669.
    Many theists have argued that contemporary physics provides evidence for the existence of God, insofar as the fundamental laws of nature display evidence of having been fine-tuned to allow for the emergence of biological life. But some have objected that this evidence needs to be weighed against the conflicting evidence that biological life is a relatively late phenomenon in the universe. For if God really wanted the universe to contain life, such that He specifically designed its laws with this in (...)
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  3.  19
    The Open Future Square of Opposition: A Defense.Elijah Hess - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):573-587.
    This essay explores the validity of Gregory Boyd’s open theistic account of the nature of the future. In particular, it is an investigation into whether Boyd’s logical square of opposition for future contingents provides a model of reality for free will theists that can preserve both bivalence and a classical conception of omniscience. In what follows, I argue that it can.
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  4.  15
    Heidegger’s Argument for the Existence of God?Sonia Sikka - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):671-695.
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  5.  11
    Spirit.Eric Steinhart - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):557-571.
    Many religions and religious philosophies say that ultimate reality is a kind of primal energy. This energy is often described as a vital power animating living things, as a spiritual force directing the organization of matter, or as a divine creative power which generates all things. By refuting older conceptions of primal energy, modern science opens the door to new and more precise conceptions. Primal energy is referred to here as ‘spirit’. But spirit is a natural power. A naturalistic theory (...)
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  6.  14
    Divine Hiddenness, Greater Goods, and Accommodation.Luke Teeninga - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):589-603.
    J.L. Schellenberg argues that one reason to think that God does not exist is that there are people who fail to believe in Him through no fault of their own. If God were all loving, then He would ensure that these people had evidence to believe in Him so that they could enter into a personal relationship with Him. God would not remain ‘hidden’. But in the world, we actually do find people who fail to believe that God exists, and (...)
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  7.  8
    Philosophy and Religious Commitment.N. N. Trakakis - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):605-630.
    An aspect of the question of the relationship between reason and faith concerns the compatibility between philosophy and religious commitment. I begin by considering some attempts that have been made in both the analytic and Continental traditions to divorce philosophy from the life of religious faith as far as possible: in particular, I discuss Martin Heidegger’s critique of the very idea of a ‘Christian philosophy’ and Bertrand Russell’s criticism of Aquinas for not living up to the Socratic ideal of following (...)
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  8.  10
    Do Religious Beliefs Have a Place Within an ‘Epistemically Naturalized’ Cognitive System?Graham Wood - 2017 - Sophia 56 (4):539-556.
  9.  43
    Divine Simplicity, Aseity, and Sovereignty.Matthew Baddorf - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):403-418.
    The doctrine of divine simplicity has recently been ably defended, but very little work has been done considering reasons to believe God is simple. This paper begins to address this lack. I consider whether divine aseity or the related notion of divine sovereignty provide us with good reason to affirm divine simplicity. Divine complexity has sometimes been thought to imply that God would possess an efficient cause; or, alternatively, that God would be grounded by God’s constituents. I argue that divine (...)
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  10.  10
    Dislocating the Eschaton? Appraising Realized Eschatology.Mikel Burley - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):435-452.
    Was Jesus Christ a deluded prophet who expected an imminent collapse of the world followed by the dawning of a kingdom that has never eventuated? Some who reject Christianity think that he was, and as a consequence are highly suspicious about any other claims that are attributed to Jesus. However, other interpretations of the apparently eschatological pronouncements in the New Testament exist, one of which is realized eschatology, this being the idea, roughly, that the kingdom or reign of God was (...)
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  11.  5
    Perfecting the Self: From the Moral Sense to Conscience.Christina Chuang - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):483-500.
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  12.  3
    ‘The Double Privilege of Athens and Jerusalem’: The Relationship Between Philosophy and Religion in the Works of Paul Ricoeur.Michael D’Angeli - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):453-469.
    Ricoeur’s autobiographical works, written mainly in the final decade of his life, have proven to be a valuable if contentious resource. On the one hand, they bring into focus the tense relationship between philosophical and religious thought in Ricoeur’s corpus; on the other, they offer new insights into the broader interdisciplinary implications of his philosophy. This essay considers the recent interpretations and potential misconceptions associated with these late publications. I argue that, contrary to recent critiques, these autobiographical works are neither (...)
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  13.  15
    Blameworthiness, Love, and Strong Divine Sovereignty.Peter Furlong - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):419-433.
    In this paper, I explore some problems faced by those who endorse what I will call strong divine sovereignty. According to this view, every worldly event is guaranteed by God’s causal activity. The first problem this view faces is that it seems to make God morally blameworthy. I explore several possible ways for defenders of SDS to avoid this conclusion. Unfortunately, however, each of these solutions leaves another problem intact: if SDS is true, then it appears that God is not (...)
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  14.  26
    Markus Gabriel Against the World.James Hill - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):471-481.
    According to Markus Gabriel, the world does not exist. This view—baptised metametaphysical nihilism—is exposited at length in his recent book Fields of Sense, which updates his earlier project of transcendental ontology. In this paper, I question whether meta-metaphysical nihilism is internally coherent, specifically whether the proposition ‘the world does not exist’ is expressible without performative contradiction on that view. Call this the inexpressibility objection. This is not an original objection—indeed it is anticipated in Gabriel’s book. However, I believe that his (...)
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  15.  5
    Booknote on Johann August Eberhard and Immanuel Kant, Preparation for Natural Theology : With Kant ’ s Notes and the Danzig Rational Theology Transcript, Ed. & Trans. Courtney D. Fugate & John Hymers. [REVIEW]Patrick Hutchings - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):537-538.
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  16.  4
    Second Order Repentance: Official.Patrick Hutchings - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):527-532.
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  17.  14
    Response to John Makeham on Xiong Shili.Frank Jackson - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):519-522.
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  18.  3
    Xiong Shili on Why Reality Cannot Be Sought Independent of Phenomena.John Makeham - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):501-517.
    In China, Xiong Shili 熊十力 is typically regarded as one of the most important Chinese philosophers of the twentieth century. The focus of this paper is Xiong’s monistic ontology and draws its findings principally from the 1932 literary edition of his New Treatise on Nothing but Consciousness. Xiong’s New Treatise is the first substantive attempt to respond to the modernist challenge of providing Chinese philosophy with ‘system,’ and he did this in the form of an ontology. The New Treatise consists (...)
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  19.  7
    Placing Understanding/Understanding Place.Jeff Malpas - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):379-391.
    This paper sets out an account of hermeneutics as essentially ‘topological’ in character at the same time as it also argues that hermeneutics has a key role to play in making clear the nature of the topological. At the centre of the argument is the idea that place and understanding are intimately connected, that this is what determines the interconnection between topology and hermeneutics, and that this also implies an intimate belonging-together of place and thinking, of place and experience, of (...)
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  20.  2
    Xiong Shili and the New Treatise: A Review Discussion of Xiong Shili, New Treatise on the Uniqueness of Consciousness, an Annotated Translation by John Makeham.A. Charles Muller - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):523-526.
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  21.  4
    The Flexible Rule of the Hermeneut.Claude Romano - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):393-402.
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  22.  1
    Review of Susanne Claxton, Heidegger’s Gods: An Ecofeminist Perspective. [REVIEW]Bradley Warfield - 2017 - Sophia 56 (3):533-535.
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  23.  5
    Misunderstanding the Talk of the Divine: Theodicy in the Wittgensteinian Tradition.Ondřej Beran - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):183-205.
    The paper discusses the unique approach to the problem of evil employed by the Wittgensteinian philosophy of religion and ethics that is primarily represented by D. Z. Phillips. Unlike traditional solutions to the problem, Phillips’ solution consists in questioning its meaningfulness—he attacks the very ideas of God’s omnipotence, of His perfect goodness and of the need to ‘calculate’ God’s goodness against the evil within the world. A possible weakness of Phillips’ approach is his unreflected use of what he calls ‘our (...)
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  24.  19
    Free Will Theodicies for Theological Determinists.T. Ryan Byerly - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):289-310.
  25.  20
    Thomas Aquinas on Logic, Being, and Power, and Contemporary Problems for Divine Omnipotence.Errin D. Clark - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):247-261.
    I discuss Thomas Aquinas’ views on being, power, and logic, and show how together they provide rebuttals against certain principal objections to the notion of divine omnipotence. The objections I have in mind can be divided into the two classes. One says that the notion of omnipotence ends up in self-contradiction. The other says that it ends up contradicting certain doctrines of traditional theism. Thomas’ account is frequently misunderstood to be a version of what I call a ‘consistent description’ account (...)
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  26.  16
    A Radical Solution to the Problem of Evil.Gerald K. Harrison - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):279-287.
    The problem of evil is widely recognised to be the most serious challenge to the reasonableness of believing this world to be God’s creation. In this paper, I offer a novel way of responding. I argue that given a certain sort of divine command metaethics our moral intuitions and beliefs about what moral goodness substantially involves cannot reasonably be expected to provide reliable insight into what God’s moral goodness substantially involves. As such, even if it is unreasonable to believe this (...)
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  27.  10
    Skeptical Theism Remains Refuted: A Reply to Perrine.David Kyle Johnson - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):367-371.
    In my 2013 article ‘A Refutation of Skeptical Theism,’ I argued that observing seemingly unjustified evils always reduces the probability of God’s existence. When figuring the relevant probabilities, I used a basic probability calculus that simply distributes the probability of falsified hypotheses equally. In 2015, Timothy Perrine argued that, since Bayes Theorem doesn’t always equally distribute the probability of falsified hypotheses, my argument is undermined unless I can also show that my thesis follows on a Bayesian analysis. It is the (...)
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  28.  12
    God’s Existence and the Kantian Formula of Humanity.John Lemos - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):265-278.
    Immanuel Kant’s categorical imperative can be expressed as the formula of humanity. This states that rational beings ought always to treat humanity, whether in our own persons or in others, as ends in themselves and never as mere means. In this essay, I argue that if God exists, then the Kantian formula of humanity is false. The basic idea behind my argument is that if God exists, then he has knowingly created a world with all kinds of naturally occurring threats, (...)
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  29.  56
    Kant on the Epistemology of Indirect Mystical Experience.Ayon Maharaj - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):311-336.
    While numerous commentators have discussed Kant’s views on mysticism in general, very few of them have examined Kant’s specific views on different types of mystical experience. I suggest that Kant’s views on direct mystical experience differ substantially from his views on indirect mystical experience (IME). In this paper, I focus on Kant’s complex views on IME in both his pre-critical and critical writings and lectures. In the first section, I examine Kant’s early work, Dreams of a Spirit-Seer, where he defends (...)
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  30.  17
    The Logical Problem of the Trinity and the Strong Theory of Relative Identity.Molto Daniel - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):227-245.
    In this paper, I consider the philosophical consequences of one tradition in Trinitarian theology, which emphasizes that each of the persons of the Trinity is wholly God. I pay special attention to Leftow’s claim that the persons of the Godhead must be divine in the same sense of the word ‘divine’ as the Godhead itself. I argue that the existing philosophical account of the Trinity which best captures this view is what I have termed the ‘Strong Theory of Relative Identity,’ (...)
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  31.  8
    Review of Rupert Shortt, God Is No Thing: Coherent Christianity. [REVIEW]Reg Naulty - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):373-374.
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  32.  14
    The Vagueness of the Muse—The Logic of Peirce’s Humble Argument for the Reality of God.Cassiano Terra Rodrigues - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):163-182.
    Published in 1908, C.S. Peirce’s ‘A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God’ is one of his most difficult articles. Presenting a peculiar entanglement of scientific method and theology, it sketches a ‘humble’ argument for the reality—and not the existence—of God for Musers, that is, those who pursue the activity he calls ‘Musement’. In Musement, Peirce claims, we can achieve a kind of perception of the intertwinement of the three universes of experience: of feeling, of brute fact, and of reason. (...)
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  33.  5
    An Introduction to the Daśaślokī of Śaṃkara and Its Commentary Siddhāntabindu by Madhusūdana Sarasvatī.Niranjan Saha - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):355-365.
    The aim of this short article is to introduce a topical text called the Daśaślokī of Ᾱdi Śaṃkara, widely known as Śaṃkara and its only available commentary the Siddhāntabindu by Madhusūdana Sarasvatī. While these two classics delineate in a nutshell the basic tenets of Advaita Vedānta philosophy and are placed with great significance in the tradition, very little work on them, particularly those based on textual study, has been done in modern scholarship. Thus, the article, without going into much detail (...)
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  34.  9
    On the Concept of Theodicy.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):207-225.
    My purpose in this paper is to clarify or explicate the concept of theodicy. More specifically, I shall provide an account of the concept that takes its logical aspects seriously into consideration as well as satisfies the basic intuitions philosophers of religions have had about it. This shall be done by systematically analysing the several theodical conditions found in the literature. As it shall be seen, these conditions are logically related to one another; collectively, they point not to one, but (...)
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  35.  7
    Logic and Philosophy of Religion.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre & Jean-Yvez Béziau - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):139-145.
    This paper introduces a special issue on logic and philosophy of religion in this journal. After discussing the role played by logic in the philosophy of religion along with classical developments, we present the basic motivation for this special issue accompanied by an exposition of its content.
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  36.  6
    Imagine Being a Preta: Early Indian Yogācāra Approaches to Intersubjectivity.Roy Tzohar - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):337-354.
    The paper deals with the early Yogācāra strategies for explaining intersubjective agreement under a ‘mere representations’ view. Examining Vasubandhu, Asaṅga, and Sthiramati’s use of the example of intersubjective agreement among the hungry ghosts, it is demonstrated that in contrast to the way in which it was often interpreted by contemporary scholars, this example in fact served these Yogācāra thinkers to perform an ironic inversion of the realist premise—showing that intersubjective agreement not only does not require the existence of mind-independent objects (...)
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  37.  9
    The End of Eternity.Jamie Carlin Watson - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):147-162.
    A popular critique of the kalām cosmological argument is that one argument for its second premise illicitly assumes a finite starting point for the series of past temporal events, thereby begging the question against opponents. Rejecting this assumption, opponents say, eliminates any objections to the possibility that the past is infinitely old and undermines the IFA’s ability to support premise 2. I contend that the plausibility of this objection depends on ambiguities in extant formulations of the IFA and that we (...)
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  38.  4
    Review of Keith Ward, Christ and the Cosmos: A Reformulation of Trinitarian Doctrine Cambridge University Press, 2015, ISBN:978-1107531819, Pb, Xvii+271pp. [REVIEW]Woodward Philip - 2017 - Sophia 56 (2):375-377.
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  39.  6
    Review of A. A. Long, Greek Models of Mind and Self. [REVIEW]Dirk Baltzly - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):125-128.
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  40.  4
    The Kingdom of Heaven as Endless Hermeneutic: A Phenomenology of the Way.Benson Bruce Ellis - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):59-67.
    In this essay, I attempt to think along with Kevin Hart, though improvising on his text in my own way, by suggesting that ‘the way’ is one that calls anyone who wishes to follow, that it is, at heart, all about doing battle with oneself, and that this battle is best thought of as an endless hermeneutic, one inaugurated by Jesus yet also with classical precedents.
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  41.  3
    Review of Peter Chong-Beng Gan, Dialectics and the Sublime in Underhill’s Mysticism. [REVIEW]Jerome Gellman - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):133-134.
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  42.  2
    Concretion and the Concrete: A Response to My Critics.Hart Kevin - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):69-80.
    This essay consists of responses to several papers on my book *Kingdoms of God.*.
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  43.  1
    Questions From the Borders: A Response to Kevin Hart’s Kingdoms of God.Tamsin Jones - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):5-14.
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  44.  3
    The Affective Subject: Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Henry on the Role of Affect in the Constitution of Subjectivity.Joshua Lupo - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):99-114.
    In this essay, I develop an affective account of subjectivity that draws on two important philosophers within the phenomenological tradition. Many claim that the philosophies of Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Henry are entirely opposed to one another. Levinas is typically thought of as a philosopher of transcendence, while Henry is typically thought of as a philosopher of immanence. By attending to the role that affect plays in the work of both thinkers, I demonstrate that traces of immanence can be located (...)
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  45.  6
    Review of J. Aaron Simmons and Bruce Ellis Benson, The New Phenomenology: A Philosophical Introduction. [REVIEW]Mackinlay Shane - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):129-131.
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  46.  8
    Hermeneutic Perspectives on Ontology, After Metaphysics has Been Overcome: From Levinas to Merleau-Ponty.Shane Mackinlay - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):115-124.
    One of the ways in which Heidegger characterised his philosophical project was as ‘overcoming metaphysics.’ This was a way of expressing the task of destruction—or, in Derrida’s version, deconstruction—of the tradition of western philosophy. One of the consequences of Heidegger’s critique of traditional western metaphysics is that, in the decades since, there has been a reluctance to engage in anything that might be called ‘metaphysics’. This is somewhat ironic, given that one of the branches of metaphysics is ontology, and that (...)
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  47.  3
    Between a Saint and a Phenomenologist: Hart’s Theological Criticism of Marion.Bradley B. Onishi - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):15-31.
    In 2013, the first reader of Jean-Luc Marion’s works appeared, Jean-Luc Marion: The Essential Writings, meticulously edited by his friend and colleague Kevin Hart. Yet, if the appearance of volume marked Marion’s status as France’s most influential living philosopher, Hart’s Kingdoms of God marks the beginning of a systematic theology long in the making. In addition to serving as the prologemenon to his planned systematics, the work also serves to differentiate Hart’s phenomenological theology from Marion’s phenomenology of revelation and doctrine (...)
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  48.  4
    A Poetics of Parable and the ‘Basileic Reduction’: Ricoeurean Reflections on Kevin Hart’s Kingdoms of God.B. Keith Putt - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):45-58.
    Reading Kevin Hart’s creative hermeneutic of the ‘basileic’ reduction in his latest book, Kingdoms of God, naturally leads me to consider another eminent linguistic phenomenologist who continually occupies my thoughts. Although I have been reading Hart now for about 25 years, I have been reading Paul Ricoeur for a decade longer than that, and it is his theory of poetic discourse that my mind keeps tenaciously associating with Hart’s perspectives on parable. Granted, Hart never mentions Ricoeur in Kingdoms of God—unless (...)
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  49.  14
    The Binding of Abraham: Levinas’s Moment in Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling.Robert C. Reed - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):81-98.
    Most readings of Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling take its account of the Abraham and Isaac story to imply fairly obviously that duty towards God is absolutely distinct from, and therefore capable of superseding, duty towards neighbor or son. This paper will argue, however, that the Akedah, or ‘binding’ of Isaac, as Kierkegaard’s pseudonym, Johannes de Silentio, depicts it, binds Abraham to Isaac in a revitalized neighbor relation that is not at all subordinate, in any simple way, to Abraham’s God-relation. The (...)
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  50.  4
    Cheaper Than a Corvette: The Relevance of Phenomenology for Contemporary Philosophy of Religion.J. Aaron Simmons - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):33-43.
    Contemporary phenomenology has often been critiqued as having crossed into the domain of confessional theology. Though I reject this characterization, I do think it is important to consider how best to understand the distinction between philosophy and theology. Accordingly, in this essay, I argue that continental philosophy of religion faces something of a mid-life crisis regarding its own professional and disciplinary identity as philosophical. Through an engagement with the recent work of Kevin Hart, I argue that new phenomenology provides important (...)
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  51.  1
    Editorial Introduction to Special Issue on Kevin Hart.J. Aaron Simmons - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):1-3.
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  52.  3
    Review of Shé Hawke, Aquamorphia: Falling for Water. [REVIEW]Lenart Škof & Jeff Stewart - 2017 - Sophia 56 (1):135-137.
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