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  1.  17
    Kant's Feeling: Why a Judgment of Taste is De Dicto Necessary.José Luis Fernández - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 43 (3):141-48.
    Necessity can be ascribed not only to propositions, but also to feelings. In the Critique of Judgment (KdU), Immanuel Kant argues that a feeling of beauty is the necessary satisfaction instantiated by the ‘free play’ of the cognitive faculties, which provides the grounds for a judgment of taste (KdU 5:196, 217-19). In contradistinction to the theoretical necessity of the Critique of Pure Reason and the moral necessity of the Critique of Practical Reason, the necessity assigned to a judgment of taste (...)
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  2.  44
    Kantian Sublimity and Supersensible Comfort: A Case for the Mathematical Sublime.José Luis Fernández - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 43 (2):24-34.
    Immanuel Kant’s work on the sublimity of aesthetic experience lends itself to puzzlement, if not misclassification. Complicating matters, Kant distinguishes between two kinds of sublimity: respectively, the “mathematical” and “dynamical” sublime. More mystifying is that the sublime is ineffable, beyond the ken of human comprehension. These perplexities notwithstanding, Kant argues that sublime sentiment produces a feeling of supersensible comfort. Commentators identify this comfort emanating most strongly from the dynamical sublime. However, in this paper I draw from the unity of reason (...)
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  3. On the Cusp of the Sublime: Environmental and Artistic Sublimity.Nicole Hall - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 43 (2):29-48.
     
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  4.  53
    Review of ShashiPrabha Kumar, Categories, Creation and Cognition in Vaiśeṣika Philosophy. [REVIEW]Malcolm Keating - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 43:139-141.
    As a guide to source material, the book will be useful to readers already somewhat familiar with Vaiśeṣika, and as a reference guide, the book’s lists of categories (padārthas) and other related concepts will also be handy for the same. However, the book is less satisfactory for readers wishing for a general introduction to the study of Vaiśeṣika, given its organization, coupled with its heavy use of untranslated Sanskrit and assumption that readers are already familiar with Indian philosophy. Philosophically speaking, (...)
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  5.  5
    Aesthetic Taste Now: A Look Beyond Art and the History of Philosophy.Michael R. Spicher - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 3 (43):159-167.
    Aesthetic taste rose to prominence in the eighteenth century, and then quickly disappeared. Since the start of the 2000s, scholars have slowly returned to the main traditional concepts in aesthetics—beauty, the sublime, and aesthetic experience. Aesthetic taste, however, has lagged behind. I focus on two explanations for this downturn: aesthetics is too often associated with art alone and taste is thought to have no connection with anything objective. In this paper, I suggest that theories of aesthetic taste are still valuable. (...)
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  6. Why We Shouldn't Give Up on Aesthetic Experience.Nicole Hall - 2020 - Journal of Comparative Literature and Aesthetics 1 (43):220-229.
     
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