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  1.  6
    Emersiology in Sport Science: The Unconscious Living Body in the Case of Corporeal Non-Property.Marie Agostinucci, Claire Liné, Erwann Jacquot, Juliette Vincent, Edmna Manis, Aline Paintendre, Mary Schirrer & Bernard Andrieu - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):67-80.
    The implicit activities of the living body in sports (such as heart rate, involuntary gestures, stress, reflex, emotional regulation and interaction expressions) emerge in the consciousness of the lived body without our voluntary control. We demonstrate physiological emersion, and how, including in dramaturgical perception, physiological flows and processes collide with the image of a whole body. In this paper, we introduce corporeal non-property as the missing (?) link between phenomenology and neuroscience, renewed by research on the cerebral unconscious and the (...)
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  2.  10
    The Influence of Psychoanalysis on Merleau-Ponty’s Philosophy and the Pulsional Body in the Gaming Experience.Terezinha Petrúcia da Nóbrega & Judson Cavalcante Bezerra - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):96-104.
    In this essay, we address the influence of psychoanalysis on Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of the esthesiological body. Our analyses are about the relation of senses and meanings established among the notions of game, sport and ludic, dialoguing with esthesiology and with the pulsional body, based on Freud's psychoanalytic referential, also approached by Merleau-Ponty. Our interlocutor considers that the expression of play in language seeks to situate the body, perception, and desire as primordial sources in the process of signification, presenting a different (...)
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  3.  9
    Seeking and Confronting Self-Imposed Challenges Set One Free: Suits, Psychoanalysis, and Sport Philosophy.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):105-121.
    Since Sigmund Freud developed and popularized psychoanalysis, this psychological theory has significantly influenced contemporary thinking, particularly in philosophical disciplines focused on understanding human behavior and addressing social problems. Take the examples of political philosophy, race theory, and feminist thought, among many others. However, although sport philosophy qualifies as one such discipline, scholars in this field have given little to no attention to psychoanalysis and psychoanalytical theorists. Remarkably, psychoanalytical notions, especially those of Eric Berne and Norman O. Brown, significantly shaped Bernard (...)
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  4.  7
    “Nothing is funnier than suffering”. Sport as a comic and perverse aesthetic practice.Andy Harvey - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):81-95.
    The article takes up diverse strands of psychoanalytic thinking to investigate how desire is manifested in male team sporting environments. In particular, it is posited that sporting desire shares a remarkable structural similarity to the joking relationship in that they both work through the overcoming of obstacles. In doing so unconscious desires are long-circuited and only emerge in radically altered form, upending traditional gender and sexual subjectivities in the process. The paper explores the concept of desire from perspectives that are (...)
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  5.  6
    Editorial: Special Issue Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: ‘Sport and Psychoanalysis’.Sandra Meeuwsen - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):1-6.
    ‘Cause of a Lust for LifeI got a Lust for LifeGot a Lust for LifeOh, a Lust for Life’Iggy Pop, 1977Why this Special Issue on Sport & Psychoanalysis, a still relatively little explored approach in c...
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  6.  6
    Hands, Feet, Eyes, and the Object a: A Lacanian Anatomy of Football.Sandra Meeuwsen & Hub Zwart - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):51-66.
    In this paper, we present a Lacanian perspective on football, while notably fathoming its normative dimension. Starting with a defining imperative, the prohibition against ‘handling’ or touching the ball with your hands, diverging football historically from rugby, we will subsequently focus our attention on the role of the foot, the eye (notably the eyes of the audience) and the ‘object a’ (in the context of gender). Against this backdrop, we will address pressing issues such as the troubled position of the (...)
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  7.  6
    Freud’s Psychoanalysis and the Genealogy of Sport.Jernej Pisk - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):23-40.
    Freudian psychoanalysis offers us often neglected but unique and very fruitful possibilities for an original interpretation of sport. In this article we first look at some basic Freudian concepts, such as the role of sexuality, the unconscious and dreams. In doing so, it becomes clear that sport can and should be interpreted in a similar way to Freud’s interpretation of dreams. Just as dreams need to be decoded and interpreted, sport needs to be decoded and interpreted in order to understand (...)
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  8.  7
    Destiny of Drives and the Triangular Method: Starting Points for a Psychoanalytic Philosophy of Sport.Odilon José Roble - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):7-22.
    This text argues that psychoanalytic philosophy is a valuable tool for the Philosophy of Sport. To situate it within the philosophical tradition, I place Freud’s ideas as an heir to the Philosophy of Impulse of Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Then, I explain how psychoanalytic philosophy can be understood as a form of hermeneutics, which aligns well with the interests of the field. I also recognise the importance of questioning whether we can consider sports and their events as analysable psychoanalytic facts. To (...)
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  9.  5
    Sublimation and drives in sports: a psychoanalytic perspective.Yunus Tuncel - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 18 (1):41-50.
    In continuation with my on-going research and presentations on sport as a field of channeling and externalizing cruelty and violence, as a field of transfiguration of drives, in this paper I will examine instincts, drives and sublimation in Freud and post-Freudian psychoanalytic literature within the context of sports. Freud was influenced by Nietzsche on his drive theory; however, in Freud it assumes a specific meaning and finds its place within the context of his overall psychoanalytic work, especially in relation to (...)
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  10.  11
    Ethical Justifications for the Use of Animals in Competitive Sport.Madeleine L. H. Campbell - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):403-421.
    Recently, shifting societal attitudes towards animals have resulted in an increasing challenge to the ‘social license’ to use animals in competitive sport. Against that background, this paper explores whether the use of animals in competitive sport is ever justifiable from the perspective of three commonly used ethical theories: deontology, utilitarianism and virtue ethics. In so doing, it recognises the importance of human understanding of animals as sentient beings. The author argues that when deontology, utilitarianism and virtue ethics are each used (...)
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  11.  13
    The ethics of pigeon racing.Jan Deckers & Silvina Pezzetta - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):465-476.
    There is a dearth of academic research on the ethics of pigeon racing. We argue that pigeon racing is associated with significant benefits and disadvantages, but that the benefits that have been associated with it can be provided by alternative practices. Disadvantages include the competitive element associated with racing, which creates a strong incentive to kill birds where this is not in their best interests, as well as the welfare issues related to transportation, the widowhood system, the races themselves, and (...)
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  12.  10
    Dogs and tigers and fish, oh my! Sporting captivity.Elizabeth Foreman & Pam R. Sailors - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):477-487.
    In contemporary society, humans interact with nonhuman animals in a number of ways, many of which involve the captivity of the nonhuman animals involved. Nonhuman animals trained for sport (sled dogs, horses trained for dressage, etc.), nonhuman animals confined for human entertainment (zoos, aquariums, circuses, etc.), and companion animals are all held captive by the human beings who interact with them. However, the moral acceptability of these forms of captivity seems to vary widely; this variance isn’t only a function of (...)
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  13.  9
    Self-affirmation in sled dogs? Affordances, perceptual agency, and extreme sport.Eric Gilbertson & Bob Fischer - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):443-455.
    We argue that extreme endurance sport can be valuable for some nonhuman animals. To make the case, we focus specifically on dogsled racing. We argue that, given certain views about the nature of self-affirmation, perceptual agency, and affordances, sled dogs are capable of realizing significant value through extreme endurance running. Because our focus is on the axiological question of the nature of the value of the sport for its participants, we do not claim that extreme dogsledding is ethical; indeed, we (...)
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  14.  14
    Horses as players in equine sports.Jason Holt - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):456-464.
    Though animal ethics in sport obviously applies most urgently to cases of animals at mortal risk (e.g., hunting and bullfighting) or vulnerable to various types of abuse (e.g., doping and harmful training practices), less obvious domains bear scrutiny as well. Here I examine whether we can strictly take not just riders but horses to be players in equine sports. There is an apparent tension in the concept of equestrian prowess, a peculiar blend of skills and attitudes, between regarding horses as (...)
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  15.  6
    A ‘Game’ Bird? On Why Hunting is Not a Game and Thus Not a Sport.Rebekah Humphreys - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):432-442.
    This paper aims to provide a conceptual analysis of blood-sport as a concept. Through utilising a generalised notion of sport as well as the concept of fair-play, the objective will be to examine whether blood-sports are games and analyse to what extent, if any, blood-sports can be properly called ‘sports’. For the purposes of application and because of the sheer numbers of birds used in the sports-shooting industry, the paper will focus on a discussion of game-birding, but the findings will (...)
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  16.  7
    Hunting, the Duty to Aid, and Wild Animal Ethics.S. P. Morris - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):422-431.
    Herein I engage with the very difficult question of whether the duty to aid (sometimes called a duty of assistance or a duty of beneficence) extends so far as to justify harming persons, perhaps even lethally, in order to protect wild animals. I argue that this question is not nearly as settled as our intuitions may suggest and that Shelly Kagan’s arguments on Defending Animals, contained in his book How to Count Animals, More or Less, provide a rich substrate in (...)
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  17.  2
    Introduction to Special Issue of SEP: Sport and Species.S. P. Morris & Gabriela Tymowski-Gionet - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (4):399-402.
    The role of animals in the realm of sport is the focus of this special issue which delves into the nuanced intersections of sport, animals, and ethics. For millennia, humans have forged multifacete...
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  18.  12
    Sport and AI.Andrew Edgar - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):275-277.
    AI (Artificial Intelligence) has become the subject of intense reflection recently, not least due to the rising public profile of Open AI’s ChatGPT, and the spread of AI generated images that readi...
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  19.  13
    Book Symposium: Jason Holt, Kinetic Beauty: The Philosophical Aesthetics of Sport.Jason Holt, Stephen Mumford, John E. MacKinnon & Andrew Edgar - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):369-392.
    This book symposium on Jason Holt’s Kinetic Beauty: The Philosophical Aesthetics of Sport includes commentaries from Stephen Mumford, John E. MacKinnon and Andrew Edgar with replies from Holt.
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  20.  11
    Filozofija sporta: nastanak i razvoj discipline (Philosophy of Sport: Emergence and Development of the Discipline).Lev Kreft - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):393-397.
    From the institutional inauguration of the discipline in 1972, philosophy of sport tends to expand, spreading itself around the world from one country to another, and including new philosophical in...
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  21.  11
    Cripping Sport and Physical Activity: An Intersectional Approach to Gender and Disability.Rémi Richard, Helene Joncheray & Valentine Duquesne - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):327-341.
    The objective of this article is to propose an intersectional approach to gender and disability in sport. Starting from the postulate that the production of gender and disability-related norms is based on similar social logics, we will first show how these normative systems intersect in the field of sport and participate in the construction of heteronormative and ableist patterns. Then, we will rely on crip theory to understand to what extent it is possible to consider sport and physical activity as (...)
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  22.  10
    Skateboarding, Time and Ethics: An Auto Ethnographic Adventure of Motherhood and Risk.Esther Sayers - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):306-326.
    As a 52-year-old academic and mother of three, this research explores the ethics of the question ‘do I have time to go skateboarding?’ Using the themes of time, injury, ageing and learning, it explores the question in relation to Simone de Beauvoir’s ethics of ambiguity. The approach employs autoethnographic and sensory methods to document the authors own experience of learning to skateboard in her late forties and uses learning to skateboard as a vehicle from which to consider time and productivity. (...)
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  23.  28
    The Evolving eSports Landscape: Technology Empowerment, Intelligent Embodiment, and Digital Ethics.Yujun Xu - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (3):356-368.
    The field of eSports is undergoing a process of developing and evolving with irresistible forces. The process witnesses the ever-refreshing and hybrid meanings and definitions of Sports and eSports in the digital era of technology empowerment and advancing artificial intelligence. This paper calls us to re-construct the meanings and sporting values of eSports, re-evaluate the eSports landscape, going beyond the debate ‘Are eSports Sports?’ and move to re-examine the contextual nature and values of Sports and eSports, as well as their (...)
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  24.  4
    A Dispute Over Golf Balls.Andrew Edgar - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (2):125-126.
    Governing bodies in golf, in particular the R&A and USGA, are proposing to introduce an elite golf ball for their tournaments (the Open and the US Open) in 2026 (see https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/gol...
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  25.  78
    Sportswashing: Complicity and Corruption.Kyle Fruh, Alfred Archer & Jake Wojtowicz - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 17 (1):101-118.
    When the 2022 FIFA Men’s World Cup was awarded to Qatar, it raised a number of moral concerns, perhaps the most prominent of which was Qatar’s woeful record on human rights in the arena of migrant labour. Qatar’s interest in hosting the event is aptly characterised as a case of ‘sportswashing’. The first aim of this paper is to provide an account of the nature of sportswashing, as a practice of using an association with sport, usually through hosting an event (...)
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  26. Towards a Value-Neutral Definition of Sport.Michael Hemmingsen - 2023 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-16.
    In this paper I argue that philosophers of sport should avoid value-laden definitions of sport; that is, they should avoid building into the definition of sport that they are inherently worthwhile activities. Sports may very well often be worthwhile as a contingent matter, but this should not be taken to be a core feature included in the definition of sport. I start by outlining what I call the ‘legitimacy-conferring’ element of the category ‘sport’. I then argue that we ought not (...)
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