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  1.  2
    ‘The Russian Silver Age’: Invention or Intention? Review of Vyacheslav P. Shestakov: Russkii Serebrjanyi Vek: Zapozdavshii Renessans [The Russian Silver Age: The Belated Renaissance] St. Petersburg, Aleteia, 2017, 218 Pp, ISBN: 978-5-906980-06-9. [REVIEW]Irina Maidanskaya - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):185-190.
    In his book, Vyacheslav P. Shestakov conducts a theoretical reconstruction of the concept of the ‘Silver Age’ of Russian culture. He highlights three typical features that this phenomenon has in common with the European Renaissance: Hellenism, aestheticism and eroticism. In an effort to disprove Omry Ronen’s claim that the Silver Age was an unsuccessful invention of literary scholars, Shestakov calls the Silver Age “a certain intention, viz. a project of the future.” The monograph includes sections on Russian philosophy, painting and (...)
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  2.  3
    T. G. Masaryk’s The Spirit of Russia: Between Positivism, Axiology and Orientalism.Hanuš Nykl - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):101-115.
    The article discusses Masaryk’s work The Spirit of Russia. In terms of methodology, The Spirit of Russia is based in Positivism, in a faith in progress and a forward-looking orientation of European development. At the same time, however, it also displays certain axiological positions that condemn conservative, monarchist or religious ideas present in Russian thought. Masaryk is critical of Russian spirituality and traditional elements of Orthodox devotion. The Orthodox faith in his view represents an antipode to progress, being non-European in (...)
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  3.  4
    Visualizing Thought at Work. Review of Alyssa DeBlasio: The Filmmaker's Philosopher - Merab Mamardashvili and Russian Cinema: Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, 2019, 203 P, $75, Hardcover: ISBN 978-1-4744-4448-4.Elisa Pontini - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):191-194.
    Alyssa DeBlasio’s book The Filmmaker's philosopher - Merab Mamardashvili and Russian cinema presents Merab Mamardashvili’s philosophy seen through the eyes of film directors who were directly or indirectly influenced by his lectures. With a detailed analysis of eight films, the book brings together a generation of filmmakers who translated Mamardashvili’s message into cinematic language, performing an experiment through which we might see an alternative mode of thought at work. By showing how Mamardashvili’s considerations of metaphysical, epistemological and moral nature shine (...)
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  4.  2
    The Formation of Soviet Cultural Theory of Music.Elina Viljanen - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):135-159.
    This article explores the continuities and discontinuities of pre-Revolutionary intellectual traditions in 1920s Soviet culture and the Stalin-era cultural revolution. Through examination of the pre-revolutionary philosophical legacy underpinning Soviet musicological theory, I demonstrate that there are decisive features, such as Soviet Prometheanism, that characterize the musicology of the 1920s that both underline and differ from the pre-revolutionary philosophy of music and the musicology of the 1930s. I offer the basic outlines of a Soviet cultural theory of music formulated by Russian (...)
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  5. Rosa Luxemburg on Revolutionary Violence.Damian Winczewski - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):117-134.
    Rosa Luxemburg is considered as important critic of the economic and political violence which is indispensable to the capitalist system. However, little is written about her concept of revolutionary violence, as is usually the case in the context of her criticism of the Russian revolution. The aim of the article is to reconstruct her views on revolutionary violence based on less known sources. The analysis shows that the Polish Marxist was an original theoretician of revolutionary violence who consiedered the issues (...)
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  6. Rethinking War History: The Evolution of Representations of Stalin and His Policies During the Great Patriotic War of 1941–1945 in Soviet and Russian History Textbooks. [REVIEW]Mariya M. Yarlykova & Xunda Yu - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (2):161-184.
    The associative chain between the personality of Joseph Stalin and his role in the Great Patriotic War of 1941–1945 remains stable among the historical consciousness of Russians from the end of the war until now. Traditionally, high schools devote a large amount of time to study the history of the war, including a range of the events dedicated to remembering the war. As a result, a stable and positive attitude toward the war and its significance to the Russian nation has (...)
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  7.  5
    M. M. Bakhtin and the German Proto-Romantic Tradition.John Cook - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):59-81.
    This paper seeks to explore the relationship between Mikhail Mikhailovich Bakhtin’s theoretical apparatus and ideas of the immediate precursors of the Jena Romantik school of German Romanticism: Johann Georg Hamann (1730–1788) and Johann Gottfried Herder (1744–1803). In doing so, it examines the themes and treatments that are common to these two thinkers and Bakhtin, tracing the tradition of anti-systematic thought through Hamann, Nietzsche and Bakhtin, and the transmission of Herder’s philosophy of Bildung through the Russian cultural milieu and Goethe. Initially, (...)
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  8.  3
    German Philosophy in Vilnius in the Years 1803–1832 and the Origins of Polish Romanticism.Katarzyna Filutowska - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):19-30.
    This paper focuses on the origins of Polish Romanticism as born partially out of German idealist philosophy. I examine the influence exerted by the ideas of the most significant thinkers, such as Kant, Fichte and Schelling on both professors and students living in Vilnius at the beginning of the nineteenth century. As an adherent of Enlightenment and empirical epistemology Śniadecki was critical towards Kant as well as Romantic poetics. On the contrary, in the works of young Gołuchowski, who was well (...)
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  9.  6
    Slovak Marxist–Leninist Philosophy on Work: Experience of the Second Half of the Twentieth Century.Vasil Gluchman - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):43-58.
    The paper analyzes the concept of work in Slovak Marxist–Leninist philosophy and ethics in the second half of the twentieth century by referencing, in particular, Furnham’s critical assessment of the relationship between left-wing ideology and the values of work ethic. The author comes to the conclusion that, on the one hand, Marxist–Leninist ideology and the practice of building socialism made the notion and phenomenon of work into an ideological fetish; on the other hand, however, the real value of work and (...)
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  10.  4
    Anton Yasnitsky and René van der Veer (Eds.): Revisionist Revolution in Vygotsky Studies: Routledge, London, 2017, 316 Pp, $40.95 (Paperback), ISBN-10: 1138929697, ISBN-13: 978-1138929692.Andrey Maidansky - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):89-95.
    The authors of the volume under review proclaimed a “revisionist revolution” in Vygotsky studies. With the exception of the two chapters by Ekaterina Zavershneva, everything else in the book is written by Anton Yasnitsky—solo or in collaboration with René van der Veer, Eli Lamdan and Jennifer Fraser. It is demonstrated how the “Vygotsky cult” took shape and eventually spread throughout the world, and how the “myths” and “dogmas” of that cult are later subjected to deconstruction. The editors, van der Veer (...)
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  11.  3
    From Structuralism to Marxism (and Back?): Jan Mukařovský 1945–1963.Peter Steiner - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):1-18.
    The paper covers the last phase of Jan Mukařovský’s career between 1945 and 1964 during which his scholarly outlook underwent several steep flections. It treats his conversion from structuralism to Marxism as a story with a distinctive composition, generic characteristics, and buildup. It articulates it into three stages and argues that each accommodates the relationship between these two scholarly paradigms in a different manner. If the initial one strove toward a harmonious merge of structuralism with Marxism, the second one triggered (...)
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  12.  7
    Teresa Obolevitch, Faith and Science in Russian Religious Thought, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):83-87.
    This is a review of Teresa Obolevitch's Faith and Science in Russian Religious Thought, which provides an intellectual history of the collaboration between fides and ratio in the course of the development of Russian thought, from its Byzantine origins to the twenty-first century. Obolevitch examines various approaches to combining faith and science in such eighteenth-century thinkers as Mikhail Lomonosov and Gregory Skovoroda, the nineteenth-century thinkers Victor Kudryavtsev-Platonov, Dimitrii Golubinsky, Sergei Glagolev, the Schellingian Peter Chaadaev, the Slavophiles Alexei Khomyakov and Ivan (...)
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  13.  1
    Chance as an Existential Reality: On One of the Most Fundamental Categories in Alexander Herzen’s Thought.Jacek Uglik - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):31-41.
    The article emphasises that the importance of Herzen’s philosophical input is related to his human-centered approach. There are three areas of investigation that are of particular importance in this context: responsibility, freedom and chance. I argue that according to Herzen, chance, by tearing apart the net of supposedly necessary causes and effects in the physico-social world, proves that the existence of man is best understood as a manifestation of man's free agency. Whereas the lack of freedom would mean that an (...)
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  14.  1
    Jeff Love: The Black Circle: A Life of Alexandre Kojève: Columbia University Press, New York, 2018, 360 Pp, Hardcover, ISBN: 978-0-231-18656-8, $36.53/€42,99; Kindle, ISBN: 0231186568, $24.93/€30,99.Evert van der Zweerde - 2020 - Studies in East European Thought 72 (1):97-100.
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