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  1.  4
    Shame as Sensus Communis.Oleg Aronson - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):595-599.
    Revisiting Jaspers’ critique of the idea of collective guilt, the author proposes to consider the category of shame not as an individual moral experience, but as a sensus communis. Using the Kantian interpretation of the sensus communis to understand the collective character of shame allows us to draw attention to the fact that modern democracy (in contrast to war-oriented fascism) has lost its own main mobilizing resource and that which embodies the energy of community and the establishment of equality: revolution.
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  2. Failed human: on national guilt and its religious roots.Lina Bulakhova - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):565-574.
    This commentary considers the idea of collective responsibility in conjunction with the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Drawing on the works of Karl Jaspers and Hannah Arendt, I define a grounding for the political necessity of (self-)blaming the whole Russian nation for the crimes of this war. Researching in more detail the theological compounds of Jaspers’ views, I propose to consider the imposition of collective guilt on a nation as a form of archaic curse. I claim that the idea of metaphysical/national (...)
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  3. Russia and power: unmasking the historical origins of the present crisis: Editorial.Marina F. Bykova - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):439-446.
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  4.  2
    Schizophrenic fascism: on Russia’s war in Ukraine.Mikhail Epstein - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):475-481.
    This essay describes some of the literary, psychological, and historical causes of Russia’s war in Ukraine (2022) based on observations of the national character found in the fiction of Aleksandr Pushkin and Fyodor Dostoevsky and in philosophical and psychological essays of Petr Chaadaev, Sergei Askol’dov, and Sigmund Freud. The political ideology that stands behind the war can be characterized as schizofascism, or schizophrenic fascism that embraces the contradiction between archaic myths, chauvinism, and xenophobia, on the one hand, and corruption and (...)
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  5.  2
    Review of: Tatyana Popova, Istoriografija, bioistoriopisanie, bitsillievedenie: teorija, metodologija, praktika [Tatyana Popova, Historiography, Biohistoriography, Bitsilli Studies: Theory, Methodology, Practice], Odessa, Bondarenko M.A., 2022, 472 pp., Hardcover: ISBN 978-617-8005-47-4, ₴ 300. [REVIEW]Inna Golubovych - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):623-625.
  6.  6
    What is to be done? In the age of ignorance.Kate I. Khan - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):557-564.
    This paper is dedicated to the issue of collective guilt and the interconnection between theoretical political thinking and ethically grounded political action, collective guilt, and personal responsibility. It assumes that facing political events in a form of media representation (such as with the war conflict in Ukraine), we mostly deal with simulacra, which affects and creates passive shock content consumption instead of active participation. The interconnection between irrational and rational ways of interpretation of political conflict is shown together with the (...)
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  7.  10
    Explaining Russia’s war against Ukraine: How can foreign policy analysis and political theory be helpful?Yulia Kurnyshova & Andrey Makarychev - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):507-519.
    The article raises three key questions: what explains Putin’s (mis)calculations in the field of security and Russia’s hard-power projection onto Ukraine, what prevented both Russian and international experts from taking seriously Putin’s resolve to launch the war prior to February 24, 2022, and what would be the long-term repercussions of the war for liberal international order? To answer these interconnected questions, we refer to the discipline of foreign-policy analysis and political theory.
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  8.  5
    Guilty of goodness? Or innocently good?Artemy Magun - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):553-556.
    This roundtable intervention explores the question of collective guilt in the case of Russia’s war with Ukraine. Psychoanalytic analysis of guilt is added here to the traditional discussions of concrete and generalized responsibility of the individual for the actions of her government. An affirmative, good-oriented ethic is promoted, in contrast to the evil-centered ethic. A group guilt of intelligentsia is found in its cultural and economic domination within the Russian society, which has led to an unfortunate separation between the nationalist (...)
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  9.  5
    Intellectuals in the face of the war: between anger and guilt.Artemy Magun - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):551-551.
  10. A return of barbarism.Artemy Magun - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):483-492.
    This article discusses the 2022 war from the point of view of its well-documented savagery. It addresses philosophical discussions of barbarism and gives a dialectical explanation of this phenomenon through the gradual polarization between the forces of Enlightenment and the obstinacy of the subject. This clash has a double shape: formality versus materiality and morality versus happiness.
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  11.  1
    Roundtable: Q&A discussion.Artemy Magun, Kate Khan, Lina Bulakhova, Anastasia Merzenina, Artem Serebryakov & Oleg Aronson - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):605-615.
    This is the Q&A portion of the roundtable that focuses on the crucial issues of individual and collective guilt of the intellectual class in the face of war. The participants address the stratification of Russian society, possibilities and obstacles of dissent, and the eschatological tendencies of history by engaging with each other’s claims and ideas and seeking answers to direct questions.
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  12.  3
    Russian guilt and Russian irresponsibility.Anastasia Merzenina - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):575-583.
    The article deals with philosophical concepts of collective guilt and collective responsibility in the context of the Russian–Ukrainian conflict. Based on several ideas formulated by Kierkegaard, Hegel, and Arendt, it analyzes the phenomena of abstract collective unity and concrete action. The author concludes that contemporary Russian society needs to abandon the manifestations of the work of the “abstract”, i.e., production of feeling both of national collective pride and collective guilt. Instead, it might be useful to take the path of the (...)
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  13. The crossing of borders.Algis Mickunas - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):493-506.
    The article draws a comparison between the Peloponnesian War between ancient Sparta and Athens, on the one hand, and Russia and the West, on the other. Rather than economic and utilitarian ethics, the author proposes that aggression on the part of oppressive as opposed to democratic regimes is driven by the fear of future insignificance. Democracies represent a threat to autocracies not so much by their military power and expansionist politics, but by their very existence, openness, and the freedoms they (...)
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  14.  3
    Review of: Igor Zahrebelny, Evropeiski Khroniky [European Chronicles], Kyiv: Melnyk M.Y., 2020, 128 pp., Paperback: ISBN 978-617-7838-13-4, 250,00 UAH. [REVIEW]Nataliya Petreshak-Kulyk - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):627-629.
  15.  7
    Empty spaces: empire versus life.Helen Petrovsky - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):463-474.
    The article analyzes the ongoing Russian–Ukrainian war in terms of a colonial seizure undertaken by a fading but aggressive Russian empire. This highly political adventure is translated into more abstract terms, that is, an irresolvable conflict between existence, which is always the experience of coexistence devoid of any essence whatsoever, and imperial expansion, which is an infinite conquest of space indifferent to all forms of life. The dualism in question is backed up by the writings of two important scholars, namely, (...)
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  16.  2
    Russia as a patient for negative psychoanalysis.Julie Reshe - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):601-604.
    This paper brings together the late Freud’s concept of the death drive and Dostoevsky’s vision of primordial suffering in order to analyze anti-Ukrainian and pro-Ukrainian trends in today’s Russia. The paper encourages embracing the suffering that the death drive entails, instead of escaping it through the narrative of Russia’s ‘greatness’.
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  17.  3
    Imperialism and nationalism.Paweł Rojek - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):447-461.
    Is Russia a neoimperial or postimperial state? In this paper, I compare two interpretations proposed by political commentators Marcel Van Herpen and Dmitri Trenin. Van Herpen holds that the Russian empire is literally being rebuilt, whereas Trenin believes that Russia is just ceasing to be an empire. I argue that, contrary to popular belief, the current war against Ukraine cannot be interpreted as an attempt to restore the Russian empire. This is because being an empire requires a universalistic ideology that (...)
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  18. Review of: Fred Leplat and Chris Ford (Eds.), Ukraine: Voices of Resistance and Solidarity, London, Resistance Books, 2022, 168 pp., ISBN 9780902869257 (print), 9780902869240 9 (e-book), £10. [REVIEW]Jokubas Salyga - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):617-621.
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  19.  3
    Correction to: On the distorted structure of Russian guilt.Artem Serebryakov - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):593-593.
  20.  4
    On the distorted structure of Russian guilt.Artem Serebryakov - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):585-592.
    This commentary offers a concise description of the structure revealed in the discourse about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, but that also serves as a condition of the possibility for such events to happen. The points of view that this structure provides are relational, interdependent, and mutually constructed, and they are labeled as the Citizens, the Authorities, and the People. All these positions are structured in such a way that provides their subjects with a source of enjoyment. The positions can be (...)
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  21.  2
    Feminism as an antiwar strategy and practice: the case of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine.Veronika L. Sharova - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):521-534.
    The dynamics of political processes in the postcommunist states of Eastern Europe in the 2000s to early 2020s demonstrated a significant number of new challenges and caused many issues, including those related to the transformation of the ways and models of political behavior, civic participation, protest actions, and so on. All these elements of social and political life, in my opinion, have a gender dimension deserving a detailed analysis. In this article, based on Belarusian, Russian, and Ukrainian cases, I consider (...)
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  22. Paradoxical Russian nationalism in the Soviet context: a contentious literary debate in 1969–1970.Bingyue Tu - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (4):535-549.
    A literary debate occurred during 1969 and 1970 as Soviet society stepped into the holistic transition to conservatism. In the debate process, liberals in the journal Novyi Mir interpreted Soviet patriotism based on cultural pluralism and censured Russian nationalists of the journal Molodaia Gvardiia for deviating from Lenin’s ideas on the nationality question and obscuring the demarcation between patriotism and Russian chauvinism. Conversely, nationalists in Molodaia Gvardiia emphasized their validity in reviving the Russian tradition to defend the national culture from (...)
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  23.  2
    Review of: Svetlana Klimova: Russian Intelligentsia in Search of an Identity (Between Dostoevsky’s Oppositions and Tolstoy’s Holism), Leiden, Brill, 2020, Hardcover, ISBN 978-90-04-44060-9, $ 82,80. [REVIEW]Elena Besschetnova - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):435-438.
  24.  7
    Spinoza, Marx, and Ilyenkov (who did not know Marx’s transcription of Spinoza).Bill Bowring - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):297-317.
    In this article I start with Marx's transcriptions of Spinoza, and the deep significance of what he transcribed, from the Theologico-Political Treatise and the Correspondence, and in what order. I contend that this demonstrates what was of particular interest and importance to him at that time. Second, I examine the presence, even if not explicit, of Spinoza in Marx's works, and turn to the question whether Marx was a Spinozist. I think he was. Third, I turn to Ilyenkov and his (...)
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  25.  2
    Spinoza in Late-Soviet philosophy.Andrey Maidansky - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):333-344.
    This article considers the history of Soviet Spinoza studies after World War II. V.V. Sokolov, editor of the last Soviet publication of Spinoza’s works, regards him as a metaphysician, at times rising to dialectics, and a pantheist rising to materialism. E.V. Ilyenkov, Ya. A. Milner and B.G. Kuznetsov offer a radically different interpretation of Spinoza, as our advanced contemporary. The article provides a critical analysis of the concept of man as a “thinking body,” which Ilyenkov mistakenly ascribes to Spinoza and (...)
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  26.  2
    V. Bibikhin’s practical phenomenology.German Melikhov - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):419-433.
    This article is devoted to understanding the worldview expressed in Vladimir Bibikhin’s Leo Tolstoy’s Diaries. The most important feature of this worldview is its practical nature: Bibikhin focuses on changing one’s view of things instead of trying to develop a doctrine. Practical phenomenology is extremely vulnerable to criticism because of its pre-philosophical nature. Therefore, at this stage, I try to explicate some of the features of this peculiar thought while avoiding trying to find its faults. I draw a connection between (...)
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  27.  2
    Soviet Spinoza: introduction.Vesa Oittinen - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):267-277.
  28.  6
    Introduction to the section on time.Maja Soboleva - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):383-385.
  29.  9
    Interpretations of Spinoza in early Russian Marxism.Daniela Steila - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (3):279-296.
    The roots of the controversial readings of Spinoza during Soviet times date back to the history of Russian Marxism. Spinoza was a most influential figure whom different Marxist currents and thinkers wanted to have on their side. This article examines the most relevant interpretations. First, it sketches some fundamental traits of Plekhanov’s understanding of Spinoza’s ontology and epistemology, from his critique of German revisionism at the end of the 1890s to his polemics against empiriocriticism and its Russian impact. Spinoza was (...)
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  30.  2
    Józef M. Bocheński. Two Anniversaries.Anna Brożek, Edward Świderski & Kordula Świętorzecka - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (2):145-148.
  31.  4
    Patriotism: from Twardowski to Bocheński.Jacek Jadacki - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (2):173-196.
    In my paper, I show three concepts of patriotism present in the Lvov-Warsaw School, and try to indicate how these concepts differed and what norms they were involved in, as well as to evaluate the justifications indicated for these norms.
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  32.  3
    Review of: Alexander S. Tsygankov, Filosofskie smysly skazok A.S. Pushkina: genii evropeiskogo romantizma [Philosophical meanings of A. S. Pushkin’s fairytales: a genius of European Romanticism], Moscow, GAUGN-Press, 2020, 76 pages, Paperback: ISBN 978-5-6042181-4-3, 320 P. [REVIEW]Alla Vladimirovna Malkina - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (2):259-261.
  33.  2
    Review of: Aleksej Losev and Valentina Loseva, La gioia per l’eternità: Lettere dal gulag (1931–1933) (Radost’ na veki: Perepiska lagernykh vreimen [1931–1933]), trans. and ed. Giorgia Rimondi, postscript Elena Takho-Godi, Milano: Edizioni Angelo Guerini e Associati, 2021, 276 pp. Hardcover: ISBN 978-8862508247, 19,00 €. [REVIEW]Robert F. Slesinski - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (2):263-265.
  34.  1
    Review of: Gennadij Aljaev, Tereza Obolevitch, Tatjana Rezvykh, Aleksandr Tsygankov, S.L. Frank o F.M. Dostoevskom: novye materialy (S.L. Frank on F.M. Dostoevsky: new materials), Moscow, Institut filosofii RAN, 2021, 368 pp. [REVIEW]Robert F. Slesinski - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (2):255-257.
  35.  3
    The social myth and human domination of nature in Georg Sorel and Stanisław Brzozowski.Krystof Kasprzak - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):93-110.
    In this article I aim to bring to the fore a problematic trait of Polish philosopher Stanisław Brzozowski’s thinking, which is his insistence on the metaphysical importance of human domination of nature through work, technology, and maximization of production. The focal point of the article is Brzozowski’s interpretation of Georg Sorel, with an emphasis on Reflections on Violence and the concept of the social myth. I argue that Brzozowski considers the primary strength of the social myth to lie in its (...)
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  36.  7
    The system of Faustian meanings in Fyodor Dostoevsky’s Oeuvre.Tatyana Kovalevskaya - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):3-18.
    The article surveys various potential sources for Dostoevsky’s knowledge of the Faust legend, examines a range of arts, from literature to music, and focuses on the novel of Friedrich Maximilian Klinger as an important influence for Dostoevsky as the writer interacts with Faustian themes in The Brothers Karamazov on both literary and meta-literary levels. Klinger’s novel is considered in terms of the problems of epistemology and the limits of human cognition, problems rooted in finiteness as a defining characteristic of human (...)
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  37.  5
    The Brothers Karamazov and the theology of suffering.Elena Namli - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):19-36.
    This article offers a reflection upon The Brothers Karamazov, interpreted as a theological and philosophical contribution to the debate over humanity’s practical relationship to suffering and vulnerability. The relationship is practical insofar as the questions with which Dostoevsky struggles all relate to human agency: How should we live in the continual presence of suffering? The article reconstructs a theology of suffering in The Brothers Karamazov as a form of anti-theodicy. Further, the theology of suffering in The Brothers Karamazov is counterposed (...)
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  38.  2
    Review of: Robert F. Slesinski, The Philosophy of Semyon Frank: Human Meaning in the Godhead. Fairfax, VA: Eastern Christian Publications, 2020. 266 pages. Paperback: ISBN 978-1-940219-50-9, $ 25.00. [REVIEW]Teresa Obolevitch - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):137-139.
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  39.  2
    Marina G. Ogden, Lev Shestov’s Angel of Death: Memory, Trauma and Rebirth. Oxford: Peter Lang, 2021. 270 pp. + xix. Softcover: ISBN 9781800791121, US $67.95, eBook ISBN 9781800791145, US $67.95. [REVIEW]David Patterson - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):141-143.
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  40.  5
    Review of Mikhail Sergeev, Alexander Chumakov, Mary Theis (eds): Russian Philosophy in the Twentieth-First Century: An Anthology, with a Foreword by Alyssa DeBlasio, Leiden & Boston: Brill Rodopi, 2020. XVIII, 426 pp. Hardcover: ISBN 978-90-04-36997-6; e-book: ISBN 978-90-04-43254-3. [REVIEW]Alexander Rybas & Alexey Malinov - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):129-136.
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  41.  1
    Soviet cosmologies and ontologies (1950s–1980s): Editors’ introduction.Galin Tihanov & Keti Chukhrov - 2022 - Studies in East European Thought 74 (1):37-38.
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