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  1. Editorial: Celebrating the Centennial of the RAS Institute of Philosophy.Marina F. Bykova - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):385-389.
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  2. The Key Figures in the Field.Marina F. Bykova - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):475-476.
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  3.  5
    Postmodernist Thought of the Late Soviet Period: Three Profiles.Mikhail Epstein - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):477-493.
    This article introduces postmodernist trends in late Soviet thought through the prism of the three generations: the philosopher and writer Aleksandr Zinoviev, the poet, artist, and theorist Dmitrii Prigov, and the youngest Soviet conceptualist artistic group “The Medical Hermeneutics Inspectorate” as represented by Pavel Peppershtein, Sergei Anufriev, and Yurii Leiderman. The article shows how Conceptualism, an influential artistic and intellectual movement of the 1970s–1980–s, used the Soviet ideological system as a material for philosophical parody and pastiche, often characterized also by (...)
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  4. Correlation Between the Concepts of All-Unity and Self-Will: Vladimir Solovyov and Lev Shestov as Philosophers of Freedom.Timofej Murašov - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):425-434.
    The correlation between the philosophies of Vladimir Solovyov and Lev Shestov is a rich research theme. Despite the fact that Solovyov has been strongly criticised by Shestov, recent studies show that the two philosophers have much in common. The aim of this article is to analyse the correlation between the two main concepts propounded by Solovyov and Shestov: All-Unity and self-will. This article argues that both concepts are actually expressions of ultimate freedom, which is achieved when one is saved from (...)
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  5. Philosophy in the Early St. Petersburg Theology Academy: Toward the Roots of Classical Russian Idealism.Thomas Nemeth - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):495-515.
    The St. Petersburg Theological Academy was the first of the four academies in the early years of the nineteenth century to undergo a remodeling along the lines of a new charter for the empire’s church-affiliated educational institutions. Instruction in philosophy was mandated, but the academy faced staffing issues at the outset. Courses were taught following Wolffian guidebooks that many found to be antiquated, raising pedagogical dilemmas for the teachers. Nevertheless, a divorce between faith and reason was proscribed, and adherence to (...)
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  6. The Rule of Reality and the Reality of the Rule.Petre Petrov - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):435-457.
    The present article is a critical engagement with Aleksei Yurchak’s Everything Was Forever until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation. It contends that, as rich as Yurchak’s insights on the language culture of Brezhnev’s Stagnation have proven to be, his account ends up seriously misrepresenting the Stalinist episode in the life of Soviet ideology. This misrepresentation is due, in large part, to the problematic use of post-structuralist models, and particularly of Claude Lefort’s theorization of ideology in the modern (...)
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  7.  3
    The Influence of Friedrich Engels on Alexander Bogdanov’s Basic Elements of the Historical View of Nature.David G. Rowley - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):407-424.
    Alexander Bogdanov’s first work of philosophy, Basic Elements of the Historical View of Nature, was fundamentally influenced by Friedrich Engels. As a Marxist philosopher seeking to elaborate a comprehensive, systematic, and scientific worldview appropriate for worker–students, Bogdanov found inspiration in Engels’s Anti-Dühring, which provided him with his monist conception of being and his ‘historical view of nature’ and pointed him toward three critical elements of his work: the monism of motion, Spinoza’s naturalist and determinist system, and Charles Darwin’s conception of (...)
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  8. Galin Tihanov, The Birth and Death of Literary Theory: Regimes of Relevance in Russia and Beyond. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019. 258 Pages. $60. Hardcover ISBN: 9,780,804,785,228. [REVIEW]Lina Steiner - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):517-523.
    This review discusses an important recent book by Galin Tihanov, the George Steiner Professor of Comparative Literature, Queen Mary University of London.
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  9. Pictorial Meaning, Language, Tradition: Notes on Image Semantic Analyses by Kristóf Nyíri.Gábor Szécsi - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):459-473.
    The iconic revolution changing the routine of everyday communication is gradually leading to the creation of a linguistic structure that combines visual and verbal tools in both formal and semantic aspects. Computer and mobile applications today enable high-tech imaging that ensures the spread of iconic communication in mundane interactions and the possibility of a creative combination of verbal and iconic codes for language users who navigate in a world of images in an increasingly confident manner. The iconic revolution that accompanies (...)
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  10.  1
    Review of Julie Chajes, Recycled Lives: A History of Reincarnation in Blavatsky’s Theosophy, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2019, Xii + 215 P., Hardcover, ISBN 978-0-19-090913-0, £64. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (4):525-529.
    This is a review of Julie Chajes, Recycled Lives: A History of Reincarnation in Blavatsky’s Theosophy, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019. The book, which falls under the broader umbrella of the academic study of Western esotericism, is concerned with the Russian occultist Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, her doctrine of reincarnation, its development through the different phases of her literary work, and her sources, whether these be Indian philosophy, Ancient Greek philosophy, or nineteenth-century science. Blavatsky’s project, which lies at the crossroads of (...)
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  11.  1
    Review of Hila Naot, Raft on the Open Sea—Man and the World in Jan Patočka’s (1907–1977) Phenomenological Philosophy, (in Hebrew) Jerusalem: Carmel 2020, 536 Pp. 107 Shekels. [REVIEW]Oded Balaban - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):381-383.
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  12.  4
    Solidarity of the Shaken: From the Experience (Erlebnis) to History.Michaela Belejkaničová - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):287-307.
    In his Heretical Essays, Jan Patočka introduces the concept of the solidarity of the shaken. He argues that it emerges in the conditions of political violence—the frontline experience. Moreover, Patočka brings into discussion the puzzling concepts of day, night, metanoia and sacrifice, which only further problematise the idea. Researching how other thinkers have examined the phenomenon of the frontline experience, it becomes obvious that Patočka did not invent the obscure vocabulary ex nihilo. Concepts such as frontline experience, sacrifice and the (...)
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  13. Against the Self-Sufficiency of Reason. Concept of Corporeity in Feuerbach and Patočka.Kristina Bosakova - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):327-345.
    At the beginning of his book Body, Community, Language, World, Jan Patočka claims that the human body has never been considered worthy of reflection throughout the entire philosophical tradition. Human corporeity has been largely excluded from philosophical reflections since the times of Plato’s conception of the human as a being divided between a mortal body and an immortal soul. Yet there is one thinker who had, as early as the nineteenth century, described the history of philosophy, from Plato to Hegel, (...)
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  14. Guest Editors' Introduction.Kristína Bosáková & Michaela Belejkaničová - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):227-238.
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  15.  8
    Patočka and the Metaphysics of Sacrifice.James Dodd - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):271-286.
    This paper explores the theme of sacrifice as it appears in the writings of the Czech philosopher Jan Patočka from the 1970s on the subjects of history, metaphysics, and techno-civilization. The paper argues that the theme of sacrifice is best understood as part of an engagement with the problem of post-metaphysical philosophy, largely inspired by but also directed against the position of Martin Heidegger. These reflections are also best understood in relation to totalitarian resistance, exemplified by the self-immolation of Jan (...)
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  16.  4
    The Hidden Teacher: On Patočka’s Impact on Today’s Czech Philosophy.Jan Frei - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):239-248.
    This article aims to elucidate Patočka’s impact on contemporary Czech philosophy. As a preliminary, it presents Patočka’s general conception of the possible impact of philosophy as such. It seems that for Patočka, the clarifying function of philosophy was the most relevant, much more than its possible capacity to stimulate objective or social processes. It then explains what impact Patočka himself expected from his own activity as a philosopher. Here we can see that his main concern was to pass on the (...)
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  17.  9
    Epoché and Institution: The Fundamental Tension in Jan Patočka’s Phenomenology.Darian Meacham & Francesco Tava - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):309-326.
    This article examines the relation between two key, but seemingly opposed concepts in Jan Patočka’s thought: epoché and the concrete institutional polis. In doing so it attempts to elucidate the inextricable relation between phenomenology and politics in the work of the Czech philosopher, and illustrate more broadly the possibilities for approaching the political from a phenomenological perspective. The article provides a phenomenological interpretation of “care for the soul” as closely linked to Patočka’s reformulation of the core phenomenological notion of epoché. (...)
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  18. Patočka’s Asubjective Phenomenology as Latent Possibility of Husserl’s Logical Investigations.Riccardo Paparusso - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):347-365.
    This article explores Jan Patočka’s notion of “asubjective phenomenology,” which the Czech philosopher elaborated in the mature phase of his thought. More specifically, it proposes to analyze that notion in light of Patočka’s interpretation of Edmund Husserl’s Logical Investigations, in which he identifies the original, though implicit, possibility of a phenomenology independent of a subjective foundation. In the first part of the paper, the author offers an interpretation of Husserls’ concept of “theory in general” as the original model of the (...)
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  19. Translation of Jan Patočka’s “Galileo Galilei and the End of the Ancient Cosmos”.Martin Pokorný - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):367-375.
    Jan Patočka's “Galileo Galilei and the End of the Ancient Cosmos” was initially published in the popular science journal Vesmír, 33, no. 1, pp. 27–29. The year before, there had been published in the same journal, under the general heading “On the Development of the Ideas of Natural Science,” a series of Patočka’s articles, including “The First Critics of Aristotelianism” [Vesmír 32, no. 7, pp. 254–256]; “The Breakdown of Aristotle’s Dynamics and the Prelude to Modern Mechanicism” ; “Intermezzo on the (...)
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  20.  3
    Review of Martin Koci: Thinking Faith After Christianity. A Theological Reading of Jan Patočka's Phenomenological Philosophy. New York: SUNY Press, 301 Pp. Hardcover: ISBN: 978-1-4384-7893-7, $95.00, Paperback: ISBN: 978-1-4384-7892-0, $32.95. [REVIEW]Martin Ritter - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):377-379.
  21.  5
    The Allure and Impossibility of an Algorithmic Future: A Lesson From Patočka’s Supercivilisation.Ľubica Učník - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (3):249-270.
    Our experience of the present is defined by numbers, graphs and, increasingly, an algorithmically calculated future, based on the mathematical and formal reasoning that began with the rise of modern science in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Today, this reasoning is further modified and extended in the form of computer-executed, algorithmic reasoning. Instead of fallible human reasoning, algorithms—based on mining databases for ‘information’—are seen to provide more efficient processes, offering fast solutions. In this paper, then, I will follow Jan Patočka, (...)
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  22.  3
    Merab Mamardashvili, A Spy for an Unknown Country. Essays and Lectures by Merab Mamardashvili. Edited and Translated by Julia Sushytska and Alisa Slaughter. Stuttgart and Hannover, Germany: Ibidem, 2020. 242 Pages. Paperback: ISBN: 9783838214597, €34,90. [REVIEW]Alyssa DeBlasio - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (2):219-221.
  23.  1
    Review of Slobodanka M. Vladiv-Glover: Dostoevsky and the Realists: Dickens, Flaubert, Tolstoy New York: Peter Lang, 2019, 215 Pp, Hardcover, ISBN: 978-1-4331-5223-8, USD $94.95. [REVIEW]Amy D. Ronner - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (2):223-226.
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  24.  9
    Russian Ontologism: An Overview.Frédéric Tremblay - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (2):123-140.
    Russian philosophy underwent many phases: Westernism, Slavophilism, nihilism, pre-revolutionary religious philosophy, and dialectical materialism or Soviet philosophy. At first sight, each one of these phases seems antithetical to the preceding one. Yet, they all appear to have in common a certain negative attitude towards the subjectivism of Kantianism and German Idealism. In contrast to the latter, Russian philosophy typically displays a tendency towards ontologism, which is generally defined as the view that there is such a thing as being in itself, (...)
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  25.  5
    The Concept of Universality in Oleg Drobnitskii’s Moral Philosophy.Ruben Apressyan - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):95-112.
    The article analyzes the concept of universality in Oleg Drobnitskii’s ethics. As opposed to most Soviet ethicists of the 1960s and early 1970s, Drobnitskii viewed this concept along the lines of the principle of universality presented in the moral theories of Immanuel Kant and Richard Hare. However, while they considered universality to be a feature of individual moral thinking in the forms of maxims, principles, and evaluations, Drobnitskii understood universality as the main feature of moral requirements and essentially external to (...)
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  26.  7
    Imago Dei as a Critique of Capitalism and Marxism in Nikolai Berdyaev.Raul-Ovidiu Bodea - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):77-93.
  27.  8
    The Irrationality of Labour in Stanisław Brzozowski’s Philosophy of “Labour”.Krystof Kasprzak - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):37-52.
    This article explores the concept of labour through a diremptive reading of Polish philosopher Stanisław Brzozowski’s essay “Prolegomena filozofii ‘pracy’” written in 1909. This essay appears as a chapter in his main work Idee: wstęp do filozofii dojrzałości dziejowej, first published in 1910. In “Prolegomena,” Brzozowski defines labour as an inner gesture that delineates the duration of life. In the interpretation of this definition the influence of Henri Bergson on Brzozowski’s thought is stressed. Inspired by Bergson, Brzozowski understands labour as (...)
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  28.  7
    The Human Being in the Context of Contemporary Cognitive Studies and the Russian Tradition.Vladislav A. Lektorsky - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):19-35.
    Any complete understanding of human psychology must take into account that a brain’s actions in the world are mediated by the body it belongs to. In the process of such interaction the human being creates artificial things, structures and mechanisms, such as technology, relationships, and culture. The subjective world is not simply the interactions between neurons at different systemic levels, but the existence of mental contents, which are determined by specific features of a certain domain of reality with which a (...)
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  29.  6
    James D. White: Marx and Russia: The Fate of a Doctrine London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, 240 Pp, ISBN-10: 1474224067; ISBN-13: 978-1474224062. [REVIEW]Andrey Maidansky - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):113-116.
  30.  6
    Antinomism in Twentieth-Century Russian Philosophy: The Case of Pavel Florensky.Harry James Moore - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):53-76.
    This study examines the notion of antinomy, or unavoidable contradiction, in the work of Pavel Florensky. Many Russian philosophers of the Silver Age shared a common conviction which is yet to receive sufficient attention in critical literature, either in Russia or abroad. This is namely a philosophical and theological dependence on unavoidable contradiction, paradox, or antinomy. The history of antinomy and its Russian reception is introduced here before a new framework for understanding Russian antinomism is defended. This is namely the (...)
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  31.  5
    Alexander Bogdanov’s Holistic World Picture: A Materialist Mirror Image of Idealism.David G. Rowley - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):1-18.
    Between 1899 and 1906, Alexander Bogdanov developed a scientific philosophy intended to substantiate the basic principle of historical materialism—the idea that existence determines consciousness—in terms of the most advanced science and empiricist epistemology/ontology of his day. At the same time, however, he strove ‘to answer the broad needs of our workers for an overall worldview’, and in the process of doing so he elaborated a complete philosophical system and a holistic worldview. Although his intention was to serve the proletariat and (...)
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  32.  5
    Karel Sládek, Nikolay Lossky and the Case for Mystical Intuition: Translated by Pavlina and Tim Morgan, Karolinum Press, Prague, 2020, Paperback, 158 P., 240 Czk, ISBN 978-80-246-4570-4. [REVIEW]Frédéric Tremblay - 2021 - Studies in East European Thought 73 (1):117-120.
    The book under review is a translation of a monograph written in Czech entitled Nikolaj Losskij: Obhájce mystické intuice, published in 2011. As a theologian, the author is above all interested in the spiritual and theological aspects of Lossky’s thought. The first two chapters are concerned with Lossky’s life and work before and during his years in Czechoslovakia. The third chapter is devoted to the analysis and interpretation of Lossky’s booklet Mystical Intuition published in English in 1938, wherein Lossky presents (...)
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