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  1. The B Side of Imagination: Hume on Imperfect Ideas.Sofía Calvente - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):53-72.
    My aim is to look into the representational aspect of ideas, exploring not only to what Hume refers as adequate ideas, but also these cases where for a number of reasons an idea does not reach that standard. It has been suggested that the latter are fictions, but an in-depth examination of Hume texts reveals that there are several types of imperfections, such as incompleteness or imprecision that prevent an idea from being adequate. This leads to an analysis of the (...)
     
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  2.  62
    Who Speaks for Hume: The Question of Hume’s Presence in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Aleksandra Davidović - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):113-137.
    One of the reasons for many different and even opposing interpretations of Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is the absence of consensus concerning the question of which character in the Dialogues represents Hume. In this paper I argue that taking Philo to be his primary spokesperson provides us with the most consistent reading of the whole work and helps us better understand Hume’s religious viewpoint. I first stress the specific dialogue form of Hume’s work, which requires us to take into (...)
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  3. Who Speaks for Hume: Hume's Presence in the 'Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion'.Aleksandra Davidović - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):113-137.
    One of the reasons for many different and even opposing interpretations of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is the absence of consensus concerning the question of which character in the Dialogues represents Hume. In this paper I argue that taking Philo to be his primary spokesperson provides us with the most consistent reading of the whole work and helps us better understand Hume's religious viewpoint. I first stress the specific dialogue form of Hume's work, which requires us to take into (...)
     
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  4. The Role of the 'Natural History of Religion' in Hume's Critique of Religious Belief.Liz Goodnick - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):139-157.
    I argue that Hume's naturalistic explanation of religious belief in the Natural History of Religion has significant epistemic consequences. While he argues in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (and in other works) that belief in God is not justified on the basis of testimony or philosophical argument, this is not enough to show that religious belief is not warranted. In the Natural History, Hume provides a genetic explanation for religious belief. I contend that the explanation of religious belief in the (...)
     
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  5. Hume and Reliabilism.Qu Hsueh - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):27-51.
    Hume's epistemological legacy is often perceived as a predominantly negative sceptical one. His infamous problem of induction continues to perplex philosophers to this day, and many of his sceptical worries maintain their interest in contemporary eyes (e.g. with regard to reason, the senses, substance, causation). Yet Hume's positive epistemological contributions also hold significance for philosophy in this day and age. In this paper, I aim to situate Hume's epistemology in a more contemporary context, particularly with regard to the theme of (...)
     
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  6. As "Men of Sense": Godwin, Baroja, Bateson and Hume's "Of National Characters".Emilio Mazza - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):159-182.
    Men of sense, Hume says, condemn the extreme undistinguishing judgments concerning national characters; yet, he adds, they also allow that each nation has a national character or a peculiar set of resembling manners. Hume's "Of national characters" was published at the end of 1748 in unclear circumstances, but it is still the object of several discussions for different reasons. William Godwin, Julio Caro Baroja and Gregory Bateson seem to refer to it, even though only the first two acknowledge it. Godwin (...)
     
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  7.  2
    Hume's Sentimentalism: Not Non-Cognitivism.Jonas Olson - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):95-111.
    This paper considers and argues against old and recent readings of Hume according to which his account of moral judgement is non-cognitivist. In previous discussions of this topic, crucial metaethical distinctions-between sentimentalism and non-cognitivism and between psychological and semantic non-cognitivism-are often blurred. The paper aims to remedy this and argues that making the appropriate metaethical distinctions undermines alleged support for non-cognitivist interpretations of Hume. The paper focuses in particular on Hume's so-called 'motivation argument' and argues that it is a poor (...)
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  8. Towards a Humean Epistemic Ideal: Contested Alternatives and the Ideology of Modern Science.Demeter Tamás - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):7-25.
    I suggest that it is fruitful to read Hume's Enquiry concerning Human Understanding as a concise exposition of an epistemic ideal whose complex philosophical background is laid down in A Treatise of Human Nature. Accordingly, the Treatise offers a theory of cognitive and affective capacities, which serves in the Enquiry as the foundation for a critique of chimerical epistemic ideals, and the development of an alternative ideal. Taking the "mental geography" of the Treatise as his starting point, this is the (...)
     
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  9. Reading Hume on the Passions.Gabriel Watts - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):73-94.
    This paper provides a reception history of Book Two of the Treatise-Of the passions-as well as an attempt to reconcile Hume's ambitions to systematicity in Book Two with the distracted and distracting nature of the text. We currently have, I think, a good sense of the philosophical importance of Book Two within Hume's science of human nature. Yet we have not made much progress on understanding Book Two on its own terms, and especially why Book Two so often seems on (...)
     
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