Year:

  1.  2
    Vera Mackie, Nicola J. Marks, and Sarah Ferber (eds): The reproductive industry: intimate experiences and global processes.Silviya Aleksandrova-Yankulovska - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):273-278.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Vera Mackie, Nicola J. Marks, and Sarah Ferber (Eds): The Reproductive Industry: Intimate Experiences and Global Processes: Lexington Books, Lanham, 2019, 196 Pp, ISBN: 978-1-4985-7065-7. [REVIEW]Silviya Aleksandrova-Yankulovska - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5-6):273-278.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  4
    The concept of disease in the time of COVID-19.Maria Cristina Amoretti & Elisabetta Lalumera - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):203-221.
    Philosophers of medicine have formulated different accounts of the concept of disease. Which concept of disease one assumes has implications for what conditions count as diseases and, by extension, who may be regarded as having a disease and for who may be accorded the social privileges and personal responsibilities associated with being sick. In this article, we consider an ideal diagnostic test for coronavirus disease 2019 infection with respect to four groups of people—positive and asymptomatic; positive and symptomatic; negative; and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  5
    The ethics of innovation for Alzheimer’s disease: the risk of overstating evidence for metabolic enhancement protocols.Timothy Daly, Ignacio Mastroleo, David Gorski & Stéphane Epelbaum - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):223-237.
    Medical practice is ideally based on robust, relevant research. However, the lack of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer’s disease has motivated “innovative practice” to improve patients’ well-being despite insufficient evidence for the regular use of such interventions in health systems treating millions of patients. Innovative or new non-validated practice poses at least three distinct ethical questions: first, about the responsible application of new non-validated practice to individual patients ; second, about the way in which data from new non-validated practice are communicated (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5.  6
    Gregory L. Eastwood: Finishing our story: preparing for the end of life.Margherita Daverio - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):279-280.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Gregory L. Eastwood: Finishing Our Story: Preparing for the End of Life: Oxford University Press, New York, 2019, 140 Pp, ISBN: 978-0-19-088808-4. [REVIEW]Margherita Daverio - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5-6):279-280.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  2
    What is a reasonable framework for new non-validated treatments?Gert Helgesson - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):239-245.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  10
    The right to assistive technology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):247-271.
    In this paper, I argue that disabled people have a right to assistive technology, but this right cannot be grounded simply in a broader right to health care or in a more comprehensive view like the capabilities approach to justice. Both of these options are plagued by issues that I refer to as the problem of constriction, where the theory does not justify enough of the AT that disabled people should have access to, and the problem of overextension, where the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9.  3
    Correction to: Whole-brain death and integration: realigning the ontological concept with clinical diagnostic tests.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):281-282.
    My article, “Whole-brain death and integration: Realigning the ontological concept with clinical diagnostic tests”.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  4
    Relational suffering and the moral authority of love and care.Georgina D. Campelia, Jennifer C. Kett & Aaron Wightman - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):165-178.
    Suffering is a ubiquitous yet elusive concept in health care. In a field devoted to the pursuit of objective data, suffering is a phenomenon with deep ties to subjective experience, moral values, and cultural norms. Suffering’s tie to subjective experience makes it challenging to discern and respond to the suffering of others. In particular, the question of whether a child with profound neurocognitive disabilities can suffer has generated a robust discourse, rooted in philosophical conceptualizations of personhood as well as the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  6
    Our suffering and the suffering of our time.John D. Lantos - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):197-201.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12.  3
    What we talk about when we talk about pediatric suffering.Tyler Tate - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):143-163.
    In this paper I aim to show why pediatric suffering must be understood as a judgment or evaluation, rather than a mental state. To accomplish this task, first I analyze the various ways that the label of suffering is used in pediatric practice. Out of this analysis emerge what I call the twin poles of pediatric suffering. At one pole sits the belief that infants and children with severe cognitive impairment cannot suffer because they are nonverbal or lack subjective life (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13.  3
    Philosophical investigations into the essence of pediatric suffering.Tyler Tate - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):137-142.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14.  6
    Valuing life and evaluating suffering in infants with life-limiting illness.Dominic Wilkinson & Amir Zayegh - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (4):179-196.
    In this paper, we explore three separate questions that are relevant to assessing the prudential value of life in infants with severe life-limiting illness. First, what is the value or disvalue of a short life? Is it in the interests of a child to save her life if she will nevertheless die in infancy or very early childhood? Second, how does profound cognitive impairment affect the balance of positives and negatives in a child’s future life? Third, if the life of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15.  6
    Michael J. Balboni and John R. Peteet (eds): Spirituality and religion within the culture of medicine: from evidence to practice.Ana Borovečki - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):127-129.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  1
    Michael J. Balboni and John R. Peteet (Eds): Spirituality and Religion Within the Culture of Medicine: From Evidence to Practice: Oxford University Press, New York, 2017, 419 Pp, ISBN: 978-0-19-027,243-2. [REVIEW]Ana Borovečki - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2-3):127-129.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  4
    Thomas Schramme: Theories of health justice: just enough health.Margherita Daverio - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):135-136.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  2
    Thomas Schramme: Theories of Health Justice: Just Enough Health: Rowman & Littlefield, London, 2019, 147 Pp, ISBN: 978-1-78660-144-5. [REVIEW]Margherita Daverio - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2-3):135-136.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  3
    Addressing complex hospital discharge by cultivating the virtues of acknowledged dependence.Annie B. Friedrich - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):99-114.
    Every day around the country, patients are discharged from hospitals without difficulty, as the interests of the hospital and the patient tend to align: both the hospital and the patient want the patient to leave and go to a setting that will promote the patient’s continued recovery. In some cases, however, this usually routine process does not go quite as smoothly. Patients may not want to leave the hospital, or they may insist on an unsafe discharge plan. In other cases, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  4
    Walter Glannon: Psychiatric neuroethics: studies in research and practice.Mirko Daniel Garasic - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):131-133.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  3
    Walter Glannon: Psychiatric Neuroethics: Studies in Research and Practice: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2019, 408 Pp, $44.95, ISBN: 978-0-19-87885-3. [REVIEW]Mirko Daniel Garasic - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2-3):131-133.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  6
    A naturalist response to Kingma’s critique of naturalist accounts of disease.David B. Hershenov - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):83-97.
    Elselijn Kingma maintains that Christopher Boorse and other naturalists in the philosophy of medicine cannot deliver the value-free account of disease that they promise. Even if disease is understood as dysfunction and that notion can be applied in a value-free manner, values still manifest themselves in the justification for picking one particular operationalization of dysfunction over a number of competing alternatives. Disease determinations depend upon comparisons within a reference class vis-à-vis reaching organism goals. Boorse considers reference classes for a species (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  6
    Making sense of “the inevitable”.William G. Hoy - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):115-117.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  4
    Making Sense of “the Inevitable”: Mary Ann G. Cutter (Ed): Death: A Reader. University of Notre Dame Press, Bloomington, 2019, 314 Pp, $29 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-0-268-10053-7. [REVIEW]William G. Hoy - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2-3):115-117.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  3
    Mary Ann G. Cutter: Thinking through breast cancer: a philosophical exploration of diagnosis, treatment, and survival.James A. Marcum - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):119-125.
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  3
    Mary Ann G. Cutter: Thinking Through Breast Cancer: A Philosophical Exploration of Diagnosis, Treatment, and Survival: Oxford University Press, 2018, Xxiv + 223 Pp, $34.95 (Cloth), ISBN: 978-0-19-063703-3. [REVIEW]James A. Marcum - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2-3):119-125.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  13
    Experiential Knowledge in Clinical Medicine: Use and Justification.Mark R. Tonelli & Devora Shapiro - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (2):67-82.
    Within the evidence-based medicine construct, clinical expertise is acknowledged to be both derived from primary experience and necessary for optimal medical practice. Primary experience in medical practice, however, remains undervalued. Clinicians’ primary experience tends to be dismissed by EBM as unsystematic or anecdotal, a source of bias rather than knowledge, never serving as the “best” evidence to support a clinical decision. The position that clinical expertise is necessary but that primary experience is untrustworthy in clinical decision-making is epistemically incoherent. Here (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  15
    Eudaimonia and well-being: questioning the moral authority of advance directives in dementia.Philippa Byers - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):23-37.
    This paper revisits Ronald Dworkin’s influential position that a person’s advance directive for future health care and medical treatment retains its moral authority beyond the onset of dementia, even when respecting this authority involves foreshortening the life of someone who is happy and content and who no longer remembers or identifies with instructions included within the advance directive. The analysis distils a eudaimonist perspective from Dworkin’s argument and traces variations of this perspective in further arguments for the moral authority of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  17
    Leroy C. Edozien: Self-Determination in Health Care: A Property Approach to the Protection of Patients’ Rights: Routledge, 2015, 304 Pp, $140, ISBN: 978-1-4724-6198-8. [REVIEW]Massimiliano Colucci - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):53-55.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  25
    Ezekiel Emanuel, Andrew Steinmetz, and Harald Schmidt (Eds): Rationing and Resource Allocation in Healthcare: Essential Readings: Oxford University Press, New York, 2018, 558 Pp, $39.95, ISBN: 978-0-19-020075-6. [REVIEW]Margherita Daverio - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):57-58.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  4
    Is skin bleaching a moral wrong? An African bioethical perspective.Ademola Kazeem Fayemi - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):1-22.
    Focusing on black communities in Africa, in this paper, I attempt an African bioethico-aesthetic deconstruction of the falsehood in colorist definitions of beauty purveyed by the migration of non-surgical cosmetics to Africa. I provide a novel ethical evaluation of the act of skin bleaching using principles of the African ethic of communion. I argue that skin bleaching is morally wrong to the extent that it promotes disharmonious relations and false identity in the beauty industry in Africa. Drawing on scientific studies (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  5
    Medical disorder, harm, and damage.Neil Feit - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):39-52.
    Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis of medical disorder is an influential hybrid of naturalist and normative theories. In order to conclude that a condition is a disorder, according to the HDA, one must determine both that it results from a failure of a physical or psychological mechanism to perform its natural function and that it is harmful. In a recent issue of this journal, I argued that the HDA entails implausible judgments about which disorders there are and how they are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  15
    John Keown: Euthanasia, ethics and public policy: an argument against legalisation, 2nd edition.Carlos Gómez-Vírseda - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):61-66.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  14
    John Keown: Euthanasia, Ethics and Public Policy: An Argument Against Legalisation, 2nd Edition: Cambridge University Press, 2018, 531 Pp, $24.78 (Paperback), ISBN: 978-1-107-61833-6. [REVIEW]Carlos Gómez-Vírseda - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):61-66.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  21
    Jeffrey P. Kahn, Anna C. Mastroianni, and Jeremy Sugarman (Eds): Beyond Consent: Seeking Justice in Research, 2nd Edition: Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2018, 234 Pp, ISBN: 978-0-19-999068-9. [REVIEW]Laura Palazzani - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (1):59-60.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues