Think

ISSN: 1477-1756

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  1.  13
    Religious Experience and the Philosophy of Perception.Cheryl K. Chen - 2024 - Think 23 (66):5-10.
    Do we need justification in order to know God exists? Must we infer God exists, if we are to know that he is there? How might religious experience ground belief in God?
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  2.  3
    God and the Problem of Evil: Why Soul-Making Won't Suffice.Brian D. Earp - 2024 - Think 23 (66):11-15.
    If you believe in the existence of an infinitely good, all-knowing, and all-powerful deity (‘God’), how do you explain the reality of evil – including the inexpressible suffering and death of innocents? Wouldn't God be forced to vanquish such suffering due to God's very nature? Alvin Plantinga has argued, convincingly, that if the possibility of ultimate goodness somehow necessarily required that evil be allowed to exist, God, being omnibenevolent, would have to allow it. But as John Hick has noted, the (...)
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  3. Is it Ever Right to Lie? How Ethical Questions Bring us to Philosophy of Mind.Yasemin J. Erden - 2024 - Think 23 (66):59-63.
    Moral and ethical agreements require sufficiently shared values, or at least some common ground. We might think of this in terms of a shared ‘form of life’, ‘lebensform’, as Wittgenstein describes it in his Philosophical Investigations. Yet it is not clear what will be sufficient, nor how to bridge gaps when disagreement occurs, for instance on whether it is ever right to lie. Ethical and moral theories offer some guidance, but there is no guide for which theory one ought to (...)
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  4.  1
    Philosophy for Coming Through: Review of Read's Why Climate Breakdown Matters[REVIEW]John Foster - 2024 - Think 23 (66):27-31.
    Philosophy has overwhelmingly approached climate breakdown in terms of the ethical obligations to the future which it is supposed to involve. This review of a recent book by Rupert Read shows him bringing philosophy to bear on why and how it matters in the first place – as an already present disaster which could reconnect us deeply with ourselves.
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  5.  2
    Backwards Causation and Max Black's Abominable Conjunction.Brian Garrett - 2024 - Think 23 (66):33-35.
    Philosophers dispute whether an effect can be earlier than its cause (i.e. whether backwards causation can occur). For example, could a trainwreck cause a psychic to have earlier knowledge of it? Max Black tried to show backwards causation to be impossible but he failed to do so, or so I will argue. Nonetheless, his famous article can still teach us something important about certain cases of backwards causation.
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  6.  16
    Does Moral Ignorance Excuse?Neil Levy - 2024 - Think 23 (66):17-19.
    There's heated debate around whether people who did terrible things in the past, at a time when there was widespread acceptance of such actions, are appropriately blamed by us, on the grounds they weren't really morally ignorant, or their ignorance was itself culpable. I point to puzzles that arise if we blame them. We need to explain how they could act so badly if they weren't fully ignorant. I argue that plausible answers to that question entail that they're not blameworthy, (...)
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  7.  1
    My Body, My Speech.Jimmy Alfonso Licon - 2024 - Think 23 (66):43-46.
    A popular tactic for defending abortion rights is appealing to self-ownership: since I own my body, a foetus has the right to occupy it only if I allow it. One cannot be forced to bring a pregnancy to term because that would violate one's self-ownership. The same logic applies to speech: we have freedom of speech because we produce speech using the bodies that we own. To curtail that speech violates our self-ownership, or in a phrase: my body, my speech.
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  8. A Too Intimate Internet: What is Wrong with Precise Audience Selection?Thomas Mitchell - 2024 - Think 23 (66):37-42.
    It is commonly recognized that the modern capacity for mass online communication carries various dangers: fake news, rampant conspiracy theories, trolling, and so forth. It is less commonly realized that moral problems remain when the contents of online communications are completely innocuous. This article discusses one of the noteworthy features of modern digital technology, the fact that it is possible to precisely target specific audiences, and argues that this can make mass communications such as advertising and political campaigns morally problematic. (...)
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  9.  3
    All My Friends are Zombies: The Search for Consciousness.Louise Rimmer-Williams - 2024 - Think 23 (66):53-58.
    A brief introduction to the problem of other minds and knowledge of the world outside our own minds.
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  10. Exploitation, Coercion, and Other Problems with Kidney Donation.Luke Semrau - 2024 - Think 23 (66):47-52.
    Kidney failure is a major killer. Many lives could be saved through organ donation if people were less reluctant to part with their spare kidney. Should we incentive donation by paying people to do it?
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  11.  2
    Berkeley's Master Argument.Michael Wreen - 2024 - Think 23 (66):21-26.
    One of Berkeley's best-known arguments for the view that there are no material objects is the so-called Master Argument. There are several good critical discussions of it. That invites the question: is there anything new to say? Well, it will be argued, there are a few things to say. First, although refutations by logical analogy have been advanced against the Master Argument, the strongest such refutation, one which demonstrates its incoherence, has not been. It is here. Second, there are few (...)
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