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  1.  11
    The Philosothon: Philosophy as Performance.Simon Kidd - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):41-77.
    This paper addresses the question of the place for competition in philosophy by considering the example of the Philosothon, a popular school-based philosophy competition originating in Western Australia. Criticisms of this competition typically focus either on specific procedural problems, or else on the claim that the competitive spirit is inimical to collaborative philosophical inquiry. The former type of criticism is extrinsic to competitive philosophy per se, while the latter is intrinsic to it. Defenders of the Philosothon dismiss both types of (...)
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  2.  19
    Cooperation and Competition in the Philosothon.Alan Tapper & Matthew Wills - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):78-89.
    Philosothons are events in which students practise Community of Philosophical Inquiry, usually with awards being made using three criteria: critical thinking, creative thinking and collaboration. This seems to generate a tension. On the one hand it recognises collaboration as a valued trait; on the other hand, the element of competition may seem antithetical to collaboration. There are various possible considerations relevant to this apparent problem. We can pose them as seven questions. One, do the awards really recognise the best performers? (...)
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  3.  4
    Philosothons: Rewarding Collaborative Thinking.Danielle Diver - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):28-46.
    Competition, and its effect on educational environments, has been widely debated. On the one hand, it is argued that competition raises attainment and, on the other, it is said that whilst it may raise attainment for some, it exists at the expense of a supportive school environment. Should philosophy undertaken as a subject in schools, such as P4C, involve any level of competition if there is a chance of it raising performance? Scholars have argued that communities of inquiry within P4C (...)
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  4.  5
    Competition and its Tendency to Corrupt Philosophy.Yvette Drissen - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):5-27.
    Competition plays a substantial and structural role in philosophy today. It is therefore remarkable that it has received little systematic ethical scrutiny in the literature until now. This paper aims to contribute to establishing a discussion about competition in the discipline of philosophy by arguing that philosophy is not inherently competitive and that competition tends to corrupt the practice of philosophy. Regarding, I argue that philosophy can best be understood as a cooperative endeavour. The idea that philosophy is a matter (...)
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  5.  10
    Winning in Philosophy: Female Under-Representation, Competitiveness, and Implications for Inclusive High School Philosophy Competitions.Christina Easton - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):47-67.
    Women are currently under-represented in academic philosophy. This paper first considers ways in which the competitive atmosphere of philosophy might help explain this lack of diversity. For example, women are stereotyped as less competitive and as less capable of exhibiting what are considered ‘winning behaviours’ in philosophy, leading to a more stressful, less rewarding experience; lower assessments of merit by themselves and others; and potential under-performance. Second, this paper draws out the implications of this discussion for high school philosophy competitions. (...)
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  6.  1
    Philosophising with Children as a Playful Activity: Purposiveness Without Purpose.Stelios Gadris - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):68-83.
    While trying to preserve the autonomy of their playful activity consisting in a game of ‘questioning and answering’, the Gymnosophists defy Alexander the Great and, more importantly, go against their own chances of survival. Thankfully, we do not need to face such dilemmas when philosophising with children. Nevertheless, the Gymnosophists’ example helps construct a notion of philosophy for/with children as an autonomous playful activity that albeit purposive it is, however, without purpose. Alluding to an Aristotelian sense of ‘'telos'’ in its (...)
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  7.  1
    Corrupting Youth: Volume 1: History and Principles of Philosophical Enquiry (PhiE) and Volume 2: How to Facilitate Philosophical Enquiry (PhiE) by Peter Worley. [REVIEW]Aristidis Galatis - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):131-134.
    In his latest offering on the teaching of philosophy, a two-volume book titled 'Corrupting Youth', community of inquiry practitioner, educational researcher, award winning author and co-founder of the 'Philosophy Foundation ' Peter Worley, provides us with a comprehensive overview of his dialectical method of 'Philosophical Enquiry'. PhiE is a deliberately ‘informal’ but highly effective method of philosophising aimed at children of all ages. It is one whose underlying principles and techniques, Worley points out, can be traced to the ancient Greeks, (...)
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  8.  1
    What is a Philosophical Competition?Jonas Pfister - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):114-130.
    Many competitions call themselves philosophical but the question what makes them philosophical has received little attention so far. The reason might be that it seems to have a simple answer according to which a philosophical competition is a rivalry about the best philosophical performance. In the paper, I argue that this answer is too simple. I suggest a richer analysis that defines philosophical competition as a striving play. I apply the richer notion to examples of contemporary competitions for high school (...)
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  9.  2
    The Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a Place of Agon: Exploring Children’s Experiences of Competitiveness in Philosophical Dialogue.Baptiste Roucau - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):84-113.
    This paper explores an important yet overlooked aspect of Philosophy for Children : how children experience competitiveness in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry. It describes a qualitative case study conducted with 76 young people involved in CPI dialogues in formal and informal educational settings in Canada and New Zealand. Interviews and video observation revealed that participants often experienced dialogues as competitive exchanges in which ‘winning’ consisted of convincing others, while giving in to others’ opinions was associated with defeat and disappointment. (...)
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  10.  3
    Competition and its Tendency to Corrupt Philosophy.Yvette Drissen - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 1 (9):5–27.
    Competition plays a substantial and structural role in philosophy today. It is therefore remarkable that it has received little systematic ethical scrutiny in the literature until now. This paper aims to contribute to establishing a discussion about competition in the discipline of philosophy by arguing (i) that philosophy is not inherently competitive and (ii) that competition tends to corrupt the practice of philosophy. Regarding (i), I argue that philosophy can best be understood as a cooperative endeavour. The idea that philosophy (...)
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