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  1.  11
    Moral Exemplarity: The Trouble with Linda Zagzebski's Semantic Theory of Exemplarity.Emily Dumler-Winckler - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (2):162-188.
    The emotion of admiration and the semantic theory of natural kinds and direct reference are foundational for Linda Zagzebski's exemplarist moral theory and divine motivation theory. Many have examined difficulties that arise from the central role of admiration, while others have engaged her account of the incarnation. Little attention has been given to her semantic theory or philosophy of language. This essay demonstrates the difficulties and problems that arise from this theory, problems that could be avoided with a sociopractical account (...)
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  2.  13
    “You Will Not Surely Die”: The Pentecostal Aesthetics and Ethics of Serpent Handling.Michael Austin Kamenicky - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (2):189-208.
    This paper is an aesthetic analysis of the practice of serpent handling by Christians in the Appalachian region of the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to understand serpent handling's aesthetic relationship to the Pentecostal tradition and exposit the implications of this relationship for the practice's legal status. The first section examines the history and defining characteristics of serpent handling and introduces the controversial problem of whether the practice can be categorized within the Pentecostal movement. The second section (...)
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  3.  25
    The Distinction between Theology and Ethics: A Critical History.Sean Lau - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (2):209-230.
    This article sketches an intellectual history of the distinction between Christian theology and Christian ethics. The twists and turns of that history have been obscured by a recent tendency to deny the distinction's usefulness, as part of a wider strategy for reasserting theology's relevance to modern social problems. By contrast, earlier theologians assumed the value of the theology/ethics divide, interpreting it through Aristotelian, neo-Kantian, and finally Marxist categories. The distinction fell into disrepute because theologians struggled to maintain the distinction consistently (...)
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  4.  16
    Responsibility in the Anthropocene: Paul Ricoeur and the Summons to Responsibility amid Global Environmental Degradation.Michael Le Chevallier - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (2):231-261.
    The nomenclature of the Anthropocene for this geological epoch marks in a novel way the global impact of human activity on the world. Consequently, it creatively raises the alarm bell of global environmental devastation. However, the narrative implicit in the Anthropocene presents challenges to use it as a departure point for developing an ethics of responsibility, as it contains morally relevant but ambiguous etiologies, phenomenological challenges to discrete human agency, and the potential erasure of both causes and victims of global (...)
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  5.  25
    Peter Abelard is not a Proto‐Kantian.Lily M. Abadal - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):6-25.
    Though there has been much debate about whether Abelard's ethics are dangerously subjective or surprisingly absolutist, one thing is unanimous: they are intentionalist. The goal of this article is to parse out what should be meant by this claim, distancing his ethical account from the popular Kantian appraisal. Though much of the secondary literature on Abelard likens him to Kant, I argue that this is mistaken. For Abelard, an agent's intentions are informed by their affections—whether carnal or spiritual. This becomes (...)
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  6.  25
    The Logic of Kingian Nonviolence: A Synthetic Reading of Martin Luther King Jr.'s Political Thought.Nicholas Buck - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):26-49.
    Approaching Martin Luther King Jr. as a constructive political theorist, I present a synthetic view of his thought that is able to make cogent and compelling sense of prominent concepts and lines of reasoning in his writings. I contend that King's political thought, which is grounded in his moral, metaphysical, and theological convictions, is best understood as structurally teleological and oriented to the construction of an inclusive, democratic community as its end. To make this case and fill out the picture (...)
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  7.  13
    Lot's Daughters and Naomi and Ruth: Of “Moral Love” and National Myths.John E. Carter - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):50-70.
    This essay argues that the book of Ruth's reopening of Israel's history and national mythology functions in such a way as to redeem, as it were, the plight of the subaltern Moabite—a plight begun with the daughters of Lot in Genesis 19. A parallel is then drawn with the 1619 Project, the recent journalistic project which posits the entire historical sweep of African slavery in North America since 1619 as the defining arc of the United States' founding. As theoretical frames, (...)
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  8.  21
    Ethics After Comparative Religious Ethics: Rereading Little and Twiss in a Pragmatic Light.Jung H. Lee - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):71-94.
    This paper presents a rereading of David Little and Sumner Twiss's Comparative Religious Ethics in the context of its initial reception and legacy within the field of religious ethics and argues that we can read it more charitably as a piece of pragmatism rather than as a work of formalism or semi-formalism. If one does not read Little and Twiss as committed positivists concerned with realizing a specific research program associated with the “twilight of logical empiricism,” then their theoretical and (...)
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  9.  31
    Finitude, Necessity, and Healing from Despair in Kierkegaard's The Lily and the Bird.Anna Louise Strelis Söderquist - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):95-113.
    This study underscores The Lily and the Bird's response to despair in The Sickness unto Death. By suggesting in The Lily and the Bird that we look to nature's creatures to learn an attunement and responsiveness to our situation as physical creatures subject to finite constraints, Kierkegaard's text comes into dialogue with a form of misalignment portrayed in The Sickness unto Death as a refusal of the given, “the finite,” and “the necessary.” One way of seeking alignment in The Lily (...)
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  10.  12
    Why Gaps Matter—A Negative Hermeneutical Approach to the Reconciliation Process in the Diocese of British Columbia Based on the Example of Bishop Logan's “Sacred Journey”.Edda Wolff - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 52 (1):114-132.
    This essay delves into the utilization of a negative hermeneutical approach, focusing on gaps, tensions, and the absence of elements, to enrich our comprehension of reconciliation efforts. It posits that this method aids in discerning more and less appropriate approaches to reconciliation processes. Negative hermeneutics serves as both a technique and an ongoing journey of exploration, self‐assessment, and understanding our connection with otherness. By critically engaging with perspectives, it prompts deeper questions and fosters a heightened awareness of the limitations inherent (...)
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  11.  16
    The Precarious Spaces Between Us: The Exchange of Food and Merit in Thailand's Affective Moral Economy during the COVID‐19 Pandemic.Julia Cassaniti - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):737-760.
    In the middle of 2020, Buddhism in Thailand looked quite different than it had just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. Monasteries had closed their doors to the public, and monastic ordinations ceased. The institution of Thai Buddhism stayed relevant, however, largely by promoting a quite unusual practice. In addition to the typical religious activity of lay followers offering food to monks, and receiving merit from the monks in return, the path that food traveled during the pandemic also turned the other (...)
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  12.  23
    In Honor and Memory of Sumner B. Twiss.Diana Fritz Cates, Irene Oh, Bruce Grelle, Simeon O. Ilesanmi, John Kelsay, Paul Lauritzen, David Little, Ping-Cheung “Pc” Lo & Kate E. Temoney - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):545-566.
    Sumner B. (Barney) Twiss, who died in 2023, was for ten years a General Editor of the Journal of Religious Ethics (JRE). He was a frequent contributor of articles, a member of the JRE Editorial Board, and a member of the journal's Board of Trustees. In this article, colleagues and students reflect on some of his many contributions, not only to the JRE but to the broader discursive fields of comparative religious ethics and human rights.
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  13.  14
    Atmospheric Buddhism: How Buddhism is Distributed, Felt, and Moralized in a Repressive Society.Yasmin Cho - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):701-719.
    A growing number of lay Buddhist practitioners have sought out alternative ways to incorporate Buddhist teachings in their daily practices and make positive changes in society by “doing good” for others. Sometimes recognized as part of “humanistic Buddhism,” this approach emphasizes general morality and focuses on people who need help as a way to fulfill Buddhist teachings in this world. Some Chinese Buddhist practitioners who follow the Tibetan Buddhist tradition also carry out similar humanistic engagements but use more subtle space-making (...)
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  14.  15
    Tainted Legacies and the Journal of Religious Ethics.Karen V. Guth - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):673-689.
    This essay reflects on the role academic journals like the JRE can play in facilitating and addressing tainted legacies. As an institution in religious ethics, the journal not only determines whose work is important, but it also replicates such judgments, passing certain sets of issues, concerns, and methods down from the past to the present, shaping future work. Journals highlight the systemic, structural elements of legacies that we often neglect in heated debate over how to respond to them. Consequently, they (...)
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  15.  28
    Response to Focus Issue: Buddhist Moral Emotions.Maria Heim - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):805-814.
    Heim responds to the five articles by anthropologists concerned with contemporary Buddhist practices and ideologies of emotions, arguing that a history of emotions approach that attends to the centrality of emotions and their evaluations can be important for ethics. She submits that while sometimes studies of moral psychology in Buddhist ethics have focused on individuals, these articles suggest how emotions can have a very public and collective impact on social, economic, and political life. She is also interested in how these (...)
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  16.  18
    Becoming Silent Mentors: Buddhist Ethics Regarding Cadaver Donations for Science in Taiwan.C. Julia Huang - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):782-804.
    Since 1995, thousands of people in Taiwan have pledged each year to donate their cadavers to the medical college run by the Buddhist Tzu Chi (Ciji) Foundation. The “surge of cadavers” seems intriguing in a society where ancestor worship continues to be salient. Drawing on my fieldwork in 2012–2013 and 2015, the purpose of this paper is to describe a series of practices involving the transformation of a cadaver into a Buddhist moral subject: the donor, the family, and the medical (...)
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  17.  18
    Religious Ethics and the Human Dignity Revolution.Simeon O. Ilesanmi - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):652-672.
    Human dignity, even when analyzed through the lens of human rights, has received surprisingly little attention in the Journal of Religious Ethics, in contrast to a resurgent global interest in it. This article examines some possible reasons for this diminutive interest and makes a case for dignity's integration into the mainstream of religious ethics scholarship. A social conception of human dignity understands it as a conferment that entitles its holder to certain respectful treatments unavailable to those without it. As a (...)
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  18.  17
    Ethics after Humanity.Willis Jenkins - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):611-638.
    Can humanity survive climate change and mass extinction? Concepts of humanity assumed or implicit in the field at the founding of this journal are under critical pressure from multiple directions. Reading across schools of thought confronting relations sometimes called Anthropocene, this essay explains five tasks for religious ethics “after humanity:” (i) incorporate species-level relations of power and vulnerability; (ii) denaturalize planetary myth-making; (iii) undo colonial humanisms; (iv) recompose ways of life after the end of the world; and (v) reanimate ethical (...)
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  19.  14
    Futures and Uncertainties: The Journal at 50.Irene Oh - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):568-571.
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  20.  19
    Feeling Companionship: Hansen's Disease and Moral Authority in Japanese Shin Buddhism.Jessica Starling - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):720-736.
    This article draws on ethnographic fieldwork among Japanese Shin Buddhists who have an enduring commitment to volunteering with Hansen's disease patients in Japan and its former colonies. I trace the negotiation of emotions in this Jōdo Shinshū ethical context, identifying the Buddhist, Japanese, and global liberal vocabularies that ascribe moral value to various emotional responses to suffering and injustice. I argue that for these Buddhists, companionship rather than compassion serves as both an ethical ideal and a focal point of emotional (...)
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  21.  24
    Introduction to the Special Issue on Buddhist Moral Emotions.Jessica Starling & Sara Ann Swenson - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):691-700.
    This introduction to the special issue on “Buddhist Moral Emotions” explains the need for analyzing affect and emotion for a full understanding of Buddhist ethics. The introduction surveys major works in the turn to affect and advocates for ethnographic research on Buddhism as a lived religion in order to address the role of emotion in Buddhist ethics.
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  22.  20
    An Uncouth Monk: The Moral Aesthetics of Buddhist Para‐Charisma.Sara Ann Swenson - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):761-781.
    In this article, I propose a new theory of “Buddhist para-charisma” by analyzing the case of an iconoclastic monk in Vietnam. My argument draws from 20 months of ethnographic research conducted in Ho Chi Minh City between 2015 and 2019. During fieldwork, I was introduced to a highly respected monk with the extraordinary capacity to read minds and perceive karmic obstacles in the lives of his lay and monastic followers. This monk was unique for openly consuming meat and alcohol, wearing (...)
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  23.  24
    Whether and How We Will Continue to Reproduce Ourselves.Grace Y. Kao - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics 51 (4):639-651.
    The author examines two open questions for religious ethicists: whether continuing to have children is a bad idea, given the challenges of antinatalism and climate change, and how we should evaluate the future of reproductive technology. Kao responds to these questions without resolving them by drawing upon human rights, the reproductive justice framework, and principles of social justice.
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  24. Dispositions, Virtues, and Indian Ethics.Andrea Raimondi & Ruchika Jain - 2024 - Journal of Religious Ethics (2):262-297.
    According to Arti Dhand, it can be argued that all Indian ethics have been primarily virtue ethics. Many have indeed jumped on the virtue bandwagon, providing prima facie interpretations of Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist canons in virtue terms. Others have expressed firm skepticism, claiming that virtues are not proven to be grounded in the nature of things and that, ultimately, the appeal to virtue might just well be a mere façon de parler. In this paper, we aim to advance the (...)
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