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  1.  3
    Ortega’s Pragmatist Perspectivism: On the Problem of Relativism.Marnie Binder - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):384-402.
    Spanish Philosopher José Ortega y Gasset advanced a number of strong criticisms of American pragmatism, yet some pragmatist notions can also be detected in his own philosophy. Within Ortega’s pragmatist perspectivism one can locate the possibility of overcoming one of the principal perceived problems of pragmatism: namely, its tendency toward relativism. This paper focuses on the ways in which Ortega’s discussion of pragmatism pertains to history and historiography. Ortega’s position that history is written from a select number of perspectives is (...)
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  2.  4
    Appropriation, Dialogue, and Dispute: Towards a Theory of Philosophical Engagement with the Past.Yael Gazit - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):403-422.
    This article suggests a change of perspective on philosophy’s engagement with its past. It argues that rather than the putative purport of giving life to the past philosopher’s work, philosophical engagement with the past gives life to one’s own. Drawing on the neo-pragmatist thesis of Robert Brandom, it suggests looking to what philosophers do when they attribute meaning to concepts and considering their engagement with the past as appropriation in consequence. By scrutinizing Robert Pippin’s opposing thesis of philosophical engagement with (...)
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  3.  15
    Introduction.Serge Grigoriev & Robert Piercey - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):287-301.
  4.  6
    Pragmatism and Historicity.Joseph Margolis - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):302-324.
    This paper provides a straightforward argument that demonstrates the irreconcilability of pragmatism and transcendentalism, by way of Darwin’s failure to account for the emergence of the human self or person and the existential and historied import of the human invention and mastery of language. On the Darwinian issue, I examine the implications of Darwin’s having neglected the most important phase of the evolution of Homo sapiens – the invention and mastery of natural language, which account for the self-transformation of the (...)
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  5.  1
    John Dewey and James Baldwin on History, Tragedy, and the Forgetting of Race.Corey McCall - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):343-362.
    This essay examines various intellectual affinities between Dewey and Baldwin, including their pragmatic and tragic conceptions of history. I argue in the first section that Dewey’s attention to the precarious dimensions of experience and his critique of dominant modes of inquiry that prioritize the stable over the precarious pay insufficient attention to race, though this focus on the precarious over the stable aspects of experience is enough to show that pragmatism does acknowledge the tragic dimension. The subsequent section argues that (...)
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  6.  3
    “Caught in Its Movement”: Liberalism, Critique, and Dewey’s Implicit Philosophy of History.Elizabeth Portella - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):363-383.
    “Philosophers,” Dewey writes, “are parts of history, caught in its movement; creators perhaps in some measure of its future, but also assuredly creatures of its past”. The question of the philosopher’s embeddedness in either her own or some earlier historical moment constitutes an important theme in Dewey’s account of pragmatism, in particular his account of politics. In lieu of a formal treatise on history, this paper focuses on Dewey’s claims about history as they are enacted in his political analyses. Drawing (...)
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  7.  3
    To Bear the Past as a Living Wound: William James and the Philosophy of History.Bonnie Sheehey - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (3):325-342.
    Philosophers generally recognize pragmatism as a philosophy of progress. For many commentators, pragmatism is linked to a notion of historical progress through its embrace of meliorism – a forward-looking philosophy that places hope in the future possibility of improvement. This paper calls pragmatism’s progressivism into question by outlining an alternative account of meliorism in the work of William James. Drawing on his ethical writings from the 1870s and 1880s, I argue that James’s concept of hope does not imply an embrace (...)
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  8.  11
    Learning From History.Christophe Bouton - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):183-215.
    In this paper, I would like to show that Koselleck’s thesis on the dissolution of the topos historia magistra vitae in modernity is open to certain objections, to the extent that one finds in modernity a number of practical conceptions of history which are “useful for life”. My own thesis is that the topos of history as the “Guide to Life” is not so much dissolved as rather transformed with modernity, and in a sense which has to be specified. This (...)
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  9.  6
    The Soul of Historiography.Daniel Fairbrother - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):257-280.
    This paper argues for a new version of holism about historiography. The argument starts with an analogy with Aristotle’s conceptions of soul and character. The aim is to overcome the central problem critics have identified in Ankersmit’s holism about historical representations: it is not clear how a posited holistic entity can make a difference to a work of history. The solution offered in this paper is that there are two – modally distinct – dimensions of content in works of history. (...)
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  10.  49
    Ideas, Persons, and Objects in the History of Ideas.Bennett Gilbert - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):141-162.
    The history of ideas is most prominently understood as a highly specialized group of methods for the study of abstract ideas, with both diachronic and synchronic aspects. While theorizing the field has focused on the methods of study, defining the object of study – ideas – has been neglected. But the development of the theories behind material culture studies poses a sharp challenge to these narrow approaches. It both challenges the integrity of the notion of abstract ideas and also offers (...)
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  11.  6
    Editorial: Learning Lessons From History – or Not?Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):139-140.
  12.  14
    Edmund Husserl’s Internal Time Consciousness and Modern Times, a Socio-Historical Interpretation.Jonathan Martineau - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):216-234.
    This article revisits Edmund Husserl’s philosophy of time in light of the modern standardisation of time. After assessing Husserl’s innovative analysis of the experience of time and raising key issues pertaining to his derivation of objective time from an originary ‘absolute flux of consciousness’, the article addresses potential relationships between this conception of time and the historically unique experience of time based in the rise of modern clock-time. Drawing on insights from the literature within the sociology of time, the article (...)
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  13.  18
    What We Have Time For: Historical Responsibility on the Largest Scale.Steven G. Smith - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):163-182.
    A historically responsible agent is willing to be somehow in practical solidarity with all other actors with whom action is shared over time. The responsible idea of a most-inclusive history encompasses future occurrence together with all that has happened already. Despite our lack of control over future developments, we assess possible future ages as bright or dark and position ourselves as contributors to multigenerational endeavors that we hope will be long-term successes in themselves and part of a larger historical optimality. (...)
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  14.  7
    Arthur Danto, the End of Art, and the Philosophical View of History.Chiel van den Akker - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (2):235-256.
    This essay takes Arthur Danto’s end-of-art thesis as a case in point of a substantive philosophy of history. Such philosophy explains the direction that art has taken and why that direction could not have been different. Danto never scrutinized the philosophy of history that his end-of-art thesis presumes. I aim to do that by drawing a distinction between what I refer to as the common view of history and the philosophical view of history, and by arguing that we need the (...)
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  15.  16
    Objectivity and the First Law of History Writing.Arthur Alfaix Assis - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):107-128.
    Cicero once stressed as the first law of history that “the historian must not dare to tell any falsehood.” This precept entails a minimal ethical requirement that remains unscathed by the whirlpools of epistemic relativism that have called many other aspects of professional historians’ practice into question in the last century or so. No commendable scholar seems willing to invalidate Cicero’s first law, and dependable scholarship—whether relying on objectivity-friendly or objectivity-hostile theoretical assumptions—follows shared standards of integrity and accuracy with which (...)
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  16.  11
    Historical Experience as a Mode of Comprehension.Rodrigo Díaz-Maldonado - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):86-106.
    _ Source: _Page Count 21 In the past two and a half decades, Frank Ankersmit has developed a complex notion of historical experience. Despite its many virtues it has at least one major difficulty: it implies a sharp separation between experience and language. This essay aims to bridge this gap, while preserving the positive aspects of Ankersmit’s theory. To do this, I will first present the ontological and epistemological implications of Ankersmit’s notion of historical experience. Next, I will present my (...)
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  17.  45
    Simone Weil’s Philosophy of History.Bennett Gilbert - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):66-85.
    The philosophical and religious ideas of Simone Weil bear on theory of history and historiography in ways not previously explored. They amount to a view of history as a consequence of the original creation, but they also exclude theodicy. By examining these ideas we see some of the ways in which to develop a theory history centered on a conception of moral understanding that is impartialist and universal. For Weil such understanding is both inside of and outside of history. This (...)
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  18.  13
    Editorial: What is This Field Called Philosophy of History?Jouni-Matti Kuukkanen - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):1-2.
  19.  9
    Hyperfactuals.Nuno Luis Madureira - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):21-41.
    _ Source: _Page Count 21 A historical sequence is said to be hyperfactual whenever it contains facts that have been proved to exist twice, that is, they exist under two alternative courses of events: the factual and the counterfactual. In such cases, we may verify whether multiple courses of action lead to the same outcome. Drawing upon an idea from Nelson Goodman, each section of this article highlights a different type of hyperfactual sequence: those resulting from the turbulence of historical (...)
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  20.  13
    A Loosely Knit Network: Philosophy of History After Hayden White.Herman Paul - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):3-20.
  21.  32
    A Philosophical Reconstruction of the Sublime.John H. Zammito - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 13 (1):129-137.
    _ Source: _Page Count 9 Robert Doran claims that the sublime is all about transcendence transferred from the religious to the aesthetic domain of experience. Taken in this philosophical rather than stylistic sense, it proved crucial for the development of modern subjectivity. Doran traces the issue from Longinus through the decisive reception of Nicolas Boileau, who first distinguished le sublime from le style sublime, on to an extended engagement with Immanuel Kant. In all this he seeks its place in the (...)
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