17 found

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  1. Preserving Narrative Identity for Dementia Patients: Embodiment, Active Environments, and Distributed Memory.Richard Heersmink - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (8):1-16.
    One goal of this paper is to argue that autobiographical memories are extended and distributed across embodied brains and environmental resources. This is important because such distributed memories play a constitutive role in our narrative identity. So, some of the building blocks of our narrative identity are not brain-bound but extended and distributed. Recognising the distributed nature of memory and narrative identity, invites us to find treatments and strategies focusing on the environment in which dementia patients are situated. A second (...)
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  2. Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease: Why Earlier Use Makes Shared Decision Making Important.Jaime Montemayor, Harini Sarva, Karen Kelly-Blake & Laura Y. Cabrera - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (2):1-11.
    IntroductionAs deep brain stimulation has shifted to being used earlier during Parkinson’s disease, data is lacking regarding patient specific attitudes, preferences, and factors which may influence the timing of and decision to proceed with DBS in the United States. This study aims to identify and compare attitudes and preferences regarding the earlier use of DBS in Parkinson’s patients who have and have not undergone DBS.MethodsWe developed an online survey concerning attitudes about DBS and its timing in PD. The survey was (...)
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  3.  1
    Review of Walter Glannon’s The Neuroethics of Memory: From Total Recall to Oblivion, Cambridge University Press, 2019. [REVIEW]Eric Racine - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (2):1-3.
  4.  1
    Neuroenhancements in the Military: A Mixed-Method Pilot Study on Attitudes of Staff Officers to Ethics and Rules.Agnes Allansdottir, Gian Galeazzi, Jonathan Moreno, Imre Bárd, David Whetham, Ilina Singh, Edward Jacobs & Sebastian Sattler - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-18.
    Utilising science and technology to maximize human performance is often an essential feature of military activity. This can often be focused on mission success rather than just the welfare of the individuals involved. This tension has the potential to threaten the autonomy of soldiers and military physicians around the taking or administering of enhancement neurotechnologies. The Hybrid Framework was proposed by academic researchers working in the U.S. context and comprises “rules” for military neuroenhancement. Integrating traditional bioethical perspectives with the unique (...)
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  5. Exculpation and Stigma in Tourette Syndrome: An Experimental Philosophy Study.Jo Bervoets, Jarl K. Kampen & Kristien Hens - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-16.
    Purpose: There is a widespread recognition that biomedical explanations offer benefits to those diagnosed with a mental disorder. Recent research points out that such explanations may nevertheless have stigmatizing effects. In this study, this ‘mixed blessing’ account of biomedical explanations is investigated in a case of philosophical interest: Tourette Syndrome. Method: We conducted a vignette survey with 221 participants in which we first assessed quantitative attributions of blame as well as the desire for social distance for behavior associated with Tourette (...)
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  6.  1
    Novel Neurorights: From Nonsense to Substance.Jan Christoph Bublitz - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-15.
    This paper analyses recent calls for so called “neurorights”, suggested novel human rights whose adoption is allegedly required because of advances in neuroscience, exemplified by a proposal of the Neurorights Initiative. Advances in neuroscience and technology are indeed impressive and pose a range of challenges for the law, and some novel applications give grounds for human rights concerns. But whether addressing these concerns requires adopting novel human rights, and whether the proposed neurorights are suitable candidates, are a different matter. This (...)
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  7.  1
    On the Contribution of Neuroethics to the Ethics and Regulation of Artificial Intelligence.Michele Farisco, Kathinka Evers & Arleen Salles - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-12.
    Contemporary ethical analysis of Artificial Intelligence is growing rapidly. One of its most recognizable outcomes is the publication of a number of ethics guidelines that, intended to guide governmental policy, address issues raised by AI design, development, and implementation and generally present a set of recommendations. Here we propose two things: first, regarding content, since some of the applied issues raised by AI are related to fundamental questions about topics like intelligence, consciousness, and the ontological and ethical status of humans, (...)
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  8. Neither the “Devil’s Lettuce” nor a “Miracle Cure:” The Use of Medical Cannabis in the Care of Children and Youth.Margot Gunning, Ari Rotenberg, James Anderson, Lynda G. Balneaves, Tracy Brace, Bruce Crooks, Wayne Hall, Lauren E. Kelly, S. Rod Rassekh, Michael Rieder, Alice Virani, Mark A. Ware, Zina Zaslawski, Harold Siden & Judy Illes - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-8.
    Lack of guidance and regulation for authorizing medical cannabis for conditions involving the health and neurodevelopment of children is ethically problematic as it promulgates access inequities, risk-benefit inconsistencies, and inadequate consent mechanisms. In two virtual sessions using participatory action research and consensus-building methods, we obtained perspectives of stakeholders on ethics and medical cannabis for children and youth. The sessions focused on the scientific and regulatory landscape of medical cannabis, surrogate decision-making and assent, and the social and political culture of medical (...)
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  9.  6
    Moral Neuroenhancement for Prisoners of War.Blake Hereth - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-20.
    Moral agential neuroenhancement can transform us into better people. However, critics of MB raise four central objections to MANEs use: It destroys moral freedom; it kills one moral agent and replaces them with another, better agent; it carries significant risk of infection and illness; it benefits society but not the enhanced person; and it’s wrong to experiment on nonconsenting persons. Herein, I defend MANE’s use for prisoners of war fighting unjustly. First, the permissibility of killing unjust combatants entails that, in (...)
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  10. Cognitive Diminishments and Crime Prevention: “Too Smart for the Rest of Us”?Sebastian Jon Holmen - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-13.
    In this paper, I discuss whether it is ever morally permissible to diminish the cognitive abilities or capacities of some cognitively gifted offenders whose ability to commit their crimes successfully relies on them possessing these abilities or capacities. I suggest that, given such cognitive diminishments may prevent such offenders from re-offending and causing others considerable harm, this provides us with at least one good moral reason in favour of employing them. After setting out more clearly what cognitive diminishment may consist (...)
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  11.  62
    Memory Modification and Authenticity: A Narrative Approach.Muriel Leuenberger - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-19.
    The potential of memory modification techniques has raised concerns and sparked a debate in neuroethics, particularly in the context of identity and authenticity. This paper addresses the question whether and how MMTs influence authenticity. I proceed by drawing two distinctions within the received views on authenticity. From this, I conclude that an analysis of MMTs based on a dual-basis, process view of authenticity is warranted, which implies that the influence of MMTs on authenticity crucially depends on the specifics of how (...)
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  12.  6
    The Illusion of Agency in Human–Computer Interaction.Michael Madary - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-15.
    This article makes the case that our digital devices create illusions of agency. There are times when users feel as if they are in control when in fact they are merely responding to stimuli on the screen in predictable ways. After the introduction, the second section of the article offers examples of illusions of agency that do not involve human–computer interaction in order to show that such illusions are possible and not terribly uncommon. The third and fourth sections of the (...)
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  13. Concerns About Psychiatric Neurosurgery and How They Can Be Overcome: Recommendations for Responsible Research.Sabine Müller, Ansel van Oosterhout, Chris Bervoets, Markus Christen, Roberto Martínez-Álvarez & Merlin Bittlinger - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-26.
    BackgroundPsychiatric neurosurgery is experiencing a revival. Beside deep brain stimulation, several ablative neurosurgical procedures are currently in use. Each approach has a different profile of advantages and disadvantages. However, many psychiatrists, ethicists, and laypeople are sceptical about psychiatric neurosurgery.MethodsWe identify the main concerns against psychiatric neurosurgery, and discuss the extent to which they are justified and how they might be overcome. We review the evidence for the effectiveness, efficacy and safety of each approach, and discuss how this could be improved. (...)
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  14.  9
    Human Brain Organoids and Consciousness.Takuya Niikawa, Yoshiyuki Hayashi, Joshua Shepherd & Tsutomu Sawai - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-16.
    This article proposes a methodological schema for engaging in a productive discussion of ethical issues regarding human brain organoids, which are three-dimensional cortical neural tissues created using human pluripotent stem cells. Although moral consideration of HBOs significantly involves the possibility that they have consciousness, there is no widely accepted procedure to determine whether HBOs are conscious. Given that this is the case, it has been argued that we should adopt a precautionary principle about consciousness according to which, if we are (...)
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  15.  1
    Unlocking the Voices of Patients with Severe Brain Injury.Andrew Peterson, Kevin Mintz & Adrian M. Owen - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-15.
    This paper critically examines whether patients with severe brain injury, who can only communicate through assistive neuroimaging technologies, may permissibly participate in medical decisions. We examine this issue in the context of a unique case study from the Brain and Mind Institute at the University of Western Ontario. First, we describe how the standard approach to medical decision making might problematically exclude patients with communication impairments secondary to severe brain injury. Second, we present a modified approach to medical decision making. (...)
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  16. Do Different Kinds of Minds Need Different Kinds of Services? Qualitative Results From a Mixed-Method Survey of Service Preferences of Autistic Adults and Parents.Eric Racine & M. Ariel Cascio - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-20.
    Many services can assist autistic people, such as early intervention, vocational services, or support groups. Scholars and activists debate whether such services should be autism-specific or more general/inclusive/mainstream. This debate rests on not only clinical reasoning, but also ethical and social reasoning about values and practicalities of diversity and inclusion. This paper presents qualitative results from a mixed-methods study. An online survey asked autistic adults and parents of autistic people of any age in Canada, the United States, Italy, France, and (...)
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  17.  1
    The Case of Hannah Capes: How Much Does Consciousness Matter?Lois Shepherd, C. William Pike, Jesse B. Persily & Mary Faith Marshall - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-16.
    A recent legal case involving an ambiguous diagnosis in a woman with a severe disorder of consciousness raises pressing questions about treatment withdrawal in a time when much of what experts know about disorders of consciousness is undergoing revision and refinement. How much should diagnostic certainty about consciousness matter? For the judge who refused to allow withdrawal of artificial nutrition and hydration, it was dispositive. Rather than relying on substituted judgment or best interests to determine treatment decisions, he ruled that (...)
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