Journal of Indian Philosophy

ISSNs: 0022-1791, 1573-0395

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  1.  23
    Vedānta: A Survey of Recent Scholarship (II).Michael S. Allen - 2024 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 52 (1):41-71.
    This article surveys recent work on Vedānta, focusing on English-language secondary scholarship since the year 2000. The article consists of two parts. The first part (published previously) identified trends within recent scholarship, highlighting several promising areas of new research: the social history of Vedānta, Vedānta in the early modern period, vernacular Vedānta, Persian Vedānta, colonial and post-colonial Vedānta, and pedagogy and practice. It also covered edited volumes, special journal issues, and ongoing collaborative research projects. The second part (published here) provides (...)
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  2.  26
    Contradiction, Negation, and the Catuṣkoṭi: Just Several Passages from Dharmapāla’s Commentary on Āryadeva’s Catuḥśataka. [REVIEW]Chih-Chiang Hu - 2024 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 52 (1):1-20.
    Using logic-laden terms to translate and interpret what the ancient Indian Buddhist thinkers said when we are not sure what they spoke about when they spoke about ‘contradictions’, etc. in natural languages can sometimes make things frustrating. Keeping in mind Wittgenstein’s exhortation, “don’t think, but look!”, I approach the issues of contradiction, negation, and the _catuṣkoṭi_ via case-by-case study on several pertinent passages in Dharmapāla’s _Dasheng Guangbailun Shilun_. The following are some interrelated observations which should not be overgeneralized, especially considering (...)
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  3.  16
    Candrakīrti on lokaprasiddhi: A Bad Hand, or an Ace in the Hole?John Newman - 2024 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 52 (1):73-99.
    The Indian Buddhist Mādhyamika master Candrakīrti (ca. 7th century CE) grounds his philosophy in _lokaprasiddhi_ / -_prasiddha_, “that which is common knowledge / generally accepted among people in the world.” This raises the question of whether Candrakīrti accepts _everything_ that is “common knowledge” or instead distinguishes and privileges certain justifiable beliefs within common knowledge. Tom J.F. Tillemans has argued that Candrakīrti advocates a “lowest common denominator” version of _lokaprasiddhi_ instead of a model which promotes “in some areas at least, more (...)
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  4.  19
    Discerning Philosophy in the Uttarāmnāya Liturgies of the Newars.Pongsit Pangsrivongse - 2024 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 52 (1):21-40.
    Although the Kaula literature of the Newars did not give rise to a systematic philosophical school like that of their Kashmiri counterparts, I will argue in this article that philosophical thinking can be detected in Newar ritual texts. I do this by translating and analysing the unpublished _Kālīsūtra_, an important hymn found in Newar Uttarāmnāya liturgies whose transmission and composition will also be touched upon. This hymn indicates that the cult of Kālī in Nepal had a distinct ontological stance tending (...)
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