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  1.  6
    Three Senses of Atomic Accumulation—An Interpretation of Vasubandhu’s Viṃśikā Stanzas 12–13 in Light of the Abhidharmakośabhāṣya and Dharmapāla’s Dasheng Guangbailun Shilun. [REVIEW]Ching Keng - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):565-601.
    Vasubandhu’s Twenty Stanzas is among the most influential anti-Realist philosophical treatises in the history of Indian Buddhism. In particular, his refutation of the theories about the accumulation of atoms in stanza 12 if often regarded as compelling or even conclusive. But if this is the case, then the transition from stanza 12 to 13 would seem very odd, because in stanza 13 Vasubandhu bothers himself with yet another version of atomic accumulation. In this paper, I give an interpretation of stanzas (...)
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  2.  7
    The Case of Yogakṣema/Yogakkhema in Vedic and Suttapiṭaka Sources. In Response to Norman.Tiziana Pontillo & Chiara Neri - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):527-563.
    Norman in 1969 emphasised a linguistic difference between the Vedic compound yogakṣema- interpreted as a dvandva and the widely distributed Early Buddhist compound yogakkhema-, analysed as a tatpuruṣa “rest from exertion”. On the basis of our analysis of the relevant Pali sources and of the more ancient Vedic occurrences—some of which are quite far from the earliest denotation of the two cyclic phases of the assumed semi-nomadic Indo-Āryan life—we have undertaken a classification of the several meanings of this compound, in (...)
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  3.  4
    Is ‘Ātmā Vā Are Draṣṭavyaḥ, Śrotavyaḥ…’ a Vidhivākya or Not? A Discussion From Appayya’s Siddhāntaleśasaṅgraha.T. S. Rukmani - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):405-420.
    The Siddhāntaleśasaṅgraha written by Appayyadīkshitar in the seventeenth century is one of the rare texts where the author brings together the different views of Advaita present at his time. The book itself starts with the controversy surrounding whether the sentence “śrotavyaḥ…” is a vidhi-vākya or not. This paper attempts to summarize the various approaches to this question in the SLS and gives us a glimpse as to how the debate was conducted. Even though the SLS was translated by Suryanarayana Sastri (...)
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  4.  2
    Denotation as Complex and Chronologically Extended: Anvitābhidhāna in Śālikanātha’s Vākyārthamātṛkā - I.Shishir Saxena - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):489-506.
    The two theories of verbal cognition, namely abhihitānvaya and anvitābhidhāna, first put forth by the Bhāṭṭa and Prābhākara Mīmāṃsakas respectively in the second half of the first millennium C.E., can be considered as being foundational as all subsequent thinkers of the Sanskritic intellectual tradition engaged with and elaborated upon these while debating the nature of language and meaning. In this paper, I focus on the first chapter of Śālikanātha’s Vākyārthamātṛkā and outline the process of anvitābhidhāna described therein. Śālikanātha explains this (...)
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  5.  11
    Is Brahman a Person or a Self? Competing Theories in the Early Upaniṣads.Dimitry Shevchenko - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):507-526.
    In this article, I study the concept of brahman—the exhaustive formulation of truth about the world—in the early Upaniṣads. Based on close reading of two stories appearing in the Bṛhadāraṇyaka, the Kauṣītaki and the Chāndogya Upaniṣads, I reconstruct two competing theories about brahman, namely the “theory of puruṣa ” and the “theory of ātman.” While the theory of puruṣa refers to the creation of human and divine beings as a result of duplication of the anthropomorphic form of the universe, the (...)
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  6.  7
    The Manas and the Manovahā Channel in the Vārṣṇeyādhyātma of the Mahābhārata: A Critical Reading of Mahābhārata 12.207.16–29. [REVIEW]Kenji Takahashi - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):421-452.
    The Vārṣṇeyādhyātma, which is comprised of chapters 203–210 of the 12th Book of the Mahābhārata, is an early exposition of the practice of Yoga centered on the manas and the bodily channel called manovahā. The importance of the Vārṣṇeyādhyātma’s doctrine for the history of Yoga has not been appropriately acknowledged in previous research and its systematic description of the practice of Yoga has never been studied in its entirety. A careful reading of the text suggests that the Vārṣṇeyādhyātma touches upon (...)
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  7.  13
    Madhyamaka Philosophy of No-Mind: Taktsang Lotsāwa’s On Prāsaṅgika, Pramāṇa, Buddhahood and a Defense of No-Mind Thesis.Sonam Thakchoe & Julien Tempone Wiltshire - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (3):453-487.
    It is well known in contemporary Madhyamaka studies that the seventh century Indian philosopher Candrakīrti rejects the foundationalist Abhidharma epistemology. The question that is still open to debate is: Does Candrakīrti offer any alternative Madhyamaka epistemology? One possible way of addressing this question is to find out what Candrakīrti says about the nature of buddha’s epistemic processes. We know that Candrakīrti has made some puzzling remarks on that score. On the one hand, he claims buddha is the pramāṇabhūta-puruṣa (person of (...)
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  8.  9
    Aśvaghoṣa and His Canonical Sources : The Night of Awakening.Vincent Eltschinger - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):195-233.
    The present paper is the third in a series dedicated to uncovering the canonical sources of Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita and, to the extent possible, the monk-poet’s sectarian affiliation. Whereas parts I and II focused on Chapter 16’s indebtedness to sarvāstivāda Vinaya and/or Sūtra literature, this third part inquires into the sources of Aśvaghoṣa’s account of the Buddha’s enlightenment in Chapter 14. Detailed analysis reveals this chapter’s intimate relationship with T. 189, a sarvāstivāda biographical sūtra extant in Chinese translation only, but also (...)
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  9.  9
    A Bibliography of Aśvaghoṣa.Vincent Eltschinger & Nobuyoshi Yamabe - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):383-404.
    Though quite extensive in its coverage, the present bibliography does not claim to be exhaustive. Among the many works traditionally ascribed to Aśvaghoṣa, some, such as the *Mahāyānaśraddhotpādaśāstra or, to a lesser degree, the Kalpanāmaṇḍitikā alias Sūtrālaṅkāra, have lived their own lives in modern scholarship and received virtually as much attention as Aśvaghoṣa himself. An attempt has been made to list all the contributions that have proved decisive in questioning and finally rejecting the poet’s authorship of them. In much the (...)
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  10.  9
    Processions, Seductions, Divine Battles: Aśvaghoṣa at the Foundations of Old Javanese Literature.Thomas M. Hunter - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):341-360.
    The influence of Aśvaghoṣa on the later tradition of kāvya was largely passed over in the South Asian tradition, even though the debt to his influence is clear in processional scenes developed by Kālidāsa and the attempted seduction of Arjuna developed by Bhāravi in his Kirātārjunīyam. We know from the testimony of the Chinese pilgrim Yijing that the Buddhacarita was a revered object of study in the Sumatran capital Śrībhoga near the close of the seventh century CE. It thus perhaps (...)
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  11.  4
    After the Unsilence of the Birds: Remembering Aśvaghoṣa’s Sundarī.Sonam Kachru - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):289-312.
    Once encountered in Beautiful Nanda, Aśvaghoṣa’s Sundarī is unforgettable. It is easy, then, to forget that we are given to see and hear her only in two of the eighteen chapters of Aśvaghoṣa’s long, lyrical narrative of Nanda. When she is given to speak, her words and voice resonate powerfully, but the narrative reduces her at last to silence. Among the last images of her, there is the moment when she is likened to a screaming bird, bereaved of her mate, (...)
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  12.  10
    The Nirvāṇa of the Buddha and the Afterlife of Aśvaghoṣa’s Life of the Buddha.Shenghai Li - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):361-382.
    Aśvaghoṣa follows his scriptural sources closely in his narration of the story of the Buddha’s last journey leading to his nirvāṇa. The Buddhacarita and the Pāli Mahāparinibbānasutta mirror each other in their accounts of most of the places that the Buddha visited and the many events that took place during that journey. What the Buddhacarita and the Pāli sutta have in common also suggests that Aśvaghoṣa’s sources are already highly literary, even though the Buddhist poet transforms the traditional materials through (...)
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  13.  5
    Aśvaghoṣa’s Apologia: Brahmanical Ideology and Female Allure.Patrick Olivelle - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):257-268.
    The question I pose in this paper is simple but crucial: Why did Aśvaghoṣa present Brahmanism as the backdrop for the emergence of Buddhism? In both his epic poems, he presents Brahmanism as the obvious and natural condition of society and kings, in the same way that it is depicted in the Brahmanical writings themselves. It has become increasingly clear that Brahmanical texts present ideologically motivated programs for social engineering rather than accurate descriptions of social reality. If social reality did (...)
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  14.  10
    Making It Nice: Kāvya in the Second Century.Andrew Ollett - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):269-287.
    Around the second century of our era, kāvya steps out from the shadows. What was kāvya at this early moment? What ties together the kāvya produced within the Kuṣāṇa empire in North India, in Sanskrit, with that produced within the Sātavāhana empire of the South, in Prakrit? What ties the Buddhist kāvya of Mātṛceṭa, Aśvaghoṣa, and Kumāralāta to the Jain kāvya of Pālitta and the secular kāvya found in the Seven Centuries? One answer involves the idea of ornamentation : the (...)
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  15.  3
    The Sincerest Form of Flattery: On Imitations of Aśvaghoṣa’s Mahākāvyas.Richard Salomon - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):327-340.
    Imitations of the works of Aśvaghoṣa, especially the Buddhacarita, are widely attested, both in the form of extra verses interpolated into the texts themselves and of entire texts in Sanskrit and Tocharian which are restructured versions of Aśvaghoṣa’s work. Such imitations and restructurings are here evaluated from the point of view of Sanskrit literary theorists, who describe similar techniques of refashioning pre-existing poems, showing that such works should not be considered as plagiarism but rather as tributes to the original author.
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  16.  2
    Aśvaghoṣa’s Viśeṣaka : The Saundarananda and Its Pāli “Equivalents”.Eviatar Shulman - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):235-256.
    When compared with the Pāli versions of the Nanda tale—the story of the ordainment and liberation of the Buddha’s half-brother—some of the peculiar features of Aśvaghoṣa’s telling in the Saundarananda come to the fore. These include the enticing love games that Nanda plays with his wife Sundarī before he follows Buddha out of the house, and the powerful, troubling scene in which Buddha forces Nanda to ordain. While the Pāli versions are aware of fantastic elements such as the flight to (...)
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  17.  4
    A Tree in Bloom or a Tree Stripped Bare: Ways of Seeing in Aśvaghoṣa’s Life of the Buddha.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):313-326.
    Both of Aśvaghoṣa’s poetical works conclude with somewhat apologetic statements regarding his use of kāvya to deliver the Buddha’s words. Previous studies of his work have often read these statements as empty rhetoric, designed to assuage the typically suspicious attitude of the Buddhist canon toward kāvya, which consists in language beatified through ornamentation for the sole purpose of pleasure. This paper suggests that we should take Aśvaghoṣa’s statements seriously, and that indeed his poetry can be understood as conducive for liberation. (...)
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  18.  4
    Reading Aśvaghoṣa Across Boundaries: An Introduction.Roy Tzohar - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (2):187-194.
    The prominence and the importance of Aśvaghoṣa’s works and persona—to the understanding of the history of Sanskrit poetry, to the understanding of Indian Buddhism in a transitional stage and to its introduction to other parts of Asia—is well acknowledged in contemporary scholarship. But with few exceptions the existing scholarship on Aśvaghoṣa has tended to be highly specialized and focused, inviting further reading that builds on this in-depth research to offer an integrated treatment of the variegated aspects and contexts of his (...)
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  19.  4
    Dāya : The Conceptual Understanding of Inheritance and Gift in the Dāyabhāga.Manomohini Dutta - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):111-131.
    The Sanskrit term dāya is generally understood as inheritance. This study examines an influential inheritance treatise from medieval Bengal, the Dāyabhāga, to explore how dāya conceptually overlaps with gifts, even though in inheritance, the deceased does not physically hand over the inheritance to the heir, a situation which appears remarkably distinct from gift-giving. Recent Euro-American research has explored the overlap between gift and inheritance considering primarily testate situations. However, attention has not been paid to this overlap by Indological scholarship, though (...)
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  20.  9
    Manipulating the Memory of Meat-Eating: Reading the Laṅkāvatāra ’s Strategy of Introducing Vegetarianism to Buddhism.Hyoung Seok Ham - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):133-153.
    This paper examines vegetarianism in the eighth “no meat-eating” chapter of the Laṅkāvatāra with specific attention to how the sūtra confronts the previous dietary code and combats Buddhist resistance to the new doctrine. This study corroborates previous observations that vegetarianism in Indian Buddhism was a response to outsiders’ censure, rather than an expression of a specific Buddhist doctrine. It goes on to explore how the Laṅkāvatāra introduces a new dietary norm, one that was incompatible with the preexisting monastic code that (...)
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  21.  18
    What is Svabhāva-Vikalpa and with Which Consciousness is It Associated?Ching Keng - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):73-93.
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  22.  17
    Dimensions of Candrakīrti’s Conventional Reality.Shenghai Li - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):49-72.
    Although Candrakīrti has been a focus in the recent scholarly attention on conventional reality in Buddhist philosophy, the complexity of his discussions of the status of phenomenal world on the surface or conventional level has not been adequately explored. In cataloging the wide-ranging interpretations that Candrakīrti has offered, this paper identifies several clusters of connected ideas that are delineated here as dimensions of Candrakīrti’s conventional reality. It will be shown that his thoughts on the subject have divergent orientations, ranging from (...)
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  23.  12
    Dignāga on the Causality of Object-Support and Śubhagupta’s Refutation.Yufan Mao - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):95-110.
    To answer the question about an internal object serving as a cause of cognition, in his Ālambanaparīkṣāvṛtti, Dignāga elaborates two types of causality in the significance of object-support : simultaneous causality and successive causality. Simultaneous causality is characterized as invariably concomitant, which refers to the inevitable co-existence of an object and its cognition. Successive causality is characterized as resemblance, which refers to a definite causal relationship between the immediate previous consciousness and its subsequent consciousness. That is, the preceding consciousness remains (...)
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  24.  10
    Demystifying Kashmiri Rasa Ideology: Rāmacandra–Guṇacandra’s Theory of Aesthetics in Their Nāṭyadarpaṇa.Aleksandra Restifo - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):1-29.
    This paper presents a study of Rāmacandra–Guṇacandra’s theory of aesthetics in light of the Kashmiri rasa ideology and demonstrates that the Jain authors offer a new and original conceptualization of aesthetic experience, in which the spectator remains cognitively active in the course of watching the drama. In their model, the relationship between rasa and pleasure is mediated by a cognitive error, and the feeling of pleasure does not coincide with the savoring of rasa but emerges after the savoring of rasa (...)
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  25.  6
    Dharmakīrti and His Commentators on the Process of Perceptual Activities.Jeson Woo - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):31-48.
    In the tradition of Dharmakīrti, perception is, by definition, free from conceptual construction. Insofar as perception is thus, it lacks the nature of determining its object. Without identifying its object, how does perception lead one to a successful action? Perception in isolation would not be pramāṇa unless it is supplemented by perceptual judgement. This paper looks at how Dharamkīrti and his commentators offer solutions to the contradiction between perception’s foundational role and its seeming dependence on conceptual construction. The key point (...)
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  26.  19
    A Buddhist Analysis of Affective Bias.Sean M. Smith - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy (1):1-31.
    In this paper, I explore a debate between some Indian Buddhist schools regarding the nature of the underlying tendencies or anusaya-s. I focus here primarily on the ninth chapter of Kathāvatthu’s representation of a dispute about whether an anusaya can be said to have intentional object. I also briefly treat of Vasubandhu’s defense of the Sautrāntika view of anuśaya in the opening section of the fifth chapter his Abhidharmakośabhāṣyam. Following Vasubandhu, I argue against the Thervādin Abhidharmikas that the underlying tendencies (...)
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