Year:

  1.  4
    Stakeholder Dialogue as Agonistic Deliberation: Exploring the Role of Conflict and Self-Interest in Business-NGO Interaction.Teunis Brand, Vincent Blok & Marcel Verweij - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):3-30.
    ABSTRACT:Many companies engage in dialogue with nongovernmental organizations about societal issues. The question is what a regulative ideal for such dialogues should be. In the literature on corporate social responsibility, the Habermasian notion of communicative action is often presented as a regulative ideal for stakeholder dialogue, implying that actors should aim at consensus and set strategic considerations aside. In this article, we argue that in many cases, communicative action is not a suitable regulative ideal for dialogue between companies and NGOs. (...)
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  2.  4
    Reclaiming the System: Moral Responsibility, Divided Labour, and the Role of Organizations in Society, by Lisa Herzog. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. 336 Pp. [REVIEW]Guillem C. Cabana - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):155-158.
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  3.  6
    Reducing Ingroup Bias in Ethical Consumption: The Role of Construal Levels and Social Goodwill.Diego Costa Pinto, Adilson Borges, Márcia Maurer Herter & Mário Boto Ferreira - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):31-63.
    ABSTRACT:Business ethics research has long been interested in understanding the conditions under which ethical consumption is consistent versus context-dependent. Extant research suggests that many consumers fail to make consistent ethical consumption decisions and tend to engage in ethical decisions associated with ingroup identity cues. To fill this gap, four experiments examine how construal levels moderate the influence of ingroup versus outgroup identity cues in ethical consumption. The studies support the contention that when consumers use concrete construal to process information, they (...)
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  4.  3
    Firms as Political Entities: Saving Democracy Through Economic Bicameralism, by Isabelle Ferreras. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017. 213 Pp. [REVIEW]Waheed Hussain - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):159-163.
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  5.  7
    Breaking the Privacy Paradox: The Value of Privacy and Associated Duty of Firms.Kirsten Martin - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):65-96.
    ABSTRACT:The oft-cited privacy paradox is the perceived disconnect between individuals’ stated privacy expectations, as captured in surveys, and consumer market behavior in going online: individuals purport to value privacy yet still disclose information to firms. The goal of this paper is to empirically examine the conceptualization of privacy postdisclosure assumed in the privacy paradox. Contrary to the privacy paradox, the results here suggest consumers retain strong privacy expectations even after disclosing information. Privacy violations are valued akin to security violations in (...)
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  6.  9
    What’s in a Wage? A New Approach to the Justification of Pay.Jeffrey Moriarty - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):119-137.
    ABSTRACT:In this address, I distinguish and explore three conceptions of wages. A wage is a reward, given in recognition of the performance of a valued task. It is also an incentive: a way to entice workers to take and keep jobs, and to motivate them to work hard. Finally, a wage is a price of labor, and like all prices, conveys valuable information about relative scarcity. I show that each conception of wages has its own normative logic, or appropriate justification, (...)
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  7.  14
    Prioritizing Democracy: A Commentary on Smith’s Presidential Address to the Society for Business Ethics.Abraham Singer & Amit Ron - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):139-153.
    ABSTRACT:In his 2018 presidential address to the Society of Business Ethics, Jeffery Smith claimed that political approaches to business ethics must be attentive to both the distinctive nature of commercial activity and, at the same time, the degree to which such commercial activity is structured by political decisions and choices. In what we take to be a friendly extension of the argument, we claim that Smith does not go far enough with this insight. Smith’s political approach to business ethics focuses (...)
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  8.  6
    The Ethics of Universal Health Insurance, by Alex Rajczi. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019. 352 Pp. [REVIEW]Jeffery Smith - 2020 - Business Ethics Quarterly 30 (1):164-167.
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