7 found

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  1.  3
    The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the Theory of the State From Hobbes to Smith by Paul Sagar.Danielle Charette - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):248-251.
    Paul Sagar's The Opinion of Mankind serves as an excellent synthesis of the topics of sociability and sovereignty in the history of modern political thought. The main thrust of the book is to marshal David Hume's and Adam Smith's resources as first-rate philosophers on behalf of a first-rate political theory. According to Sagar, Hume's and Smith's rich accounts of human sociability, sentiment, and historical contingency provide the foundations for what Sagar calls "the state without sovereignty". By this, he means that (...)
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  2.  12
    Skeptical Influences on Hume's View of Animal Reasoning.Richard J. Fry - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):137-165.
    In his writings on non-human animals, David Hume draws comparisons between non-human animals' cognitive capacities and the cognitive capacities of humans. That Hume draws such comparisons might seem to be evidence that Hume was influenced on this issue by epistemologically skeptical thinkers such as Sextus Empiricus, Michel de Montaigne, and Pierre Bayle. This is enticing, as Hume was influenced by them on other issues and they too make comparisons between human and non-human animal reasoning. Comparing Hume's arguments in the sections (...)
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  3.  2
    The Political Lessons of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Jonathan Harold Krause - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):187-211.
    Understandably, given the interpretive challenges posed by the dialogue form, the focus of David Hume's interest in religion in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion can be difficult to pinpoint.1 Much Hume scholarship on the Dialogues has traditionally suffered from two major shortcomings. First, its treatment of Hume's interest in religion is primarily theoretical or speculative, as though Hume were concerned above all to determine the nature of "true religion," say, or to dismiss religious belief altogether as simply irrational. Such scholarship (...)
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  4.  7
    Editors' Introduction for Volume 42.Ann Levey, Karl Schafer & Amy M. Schmitter - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):3-7.
    The new editorial team, Ann Levey, Karl Schafer and Amy Schmitter, are very pleased to present this special double-issue of Hume Studies. It contains a wide variety of articles on subjects old and new, as well as an assortment of book reviews, commissioned by the new book review editor, David Landy of San Francisco State University. We are grateful to the many people who have helped us get this volume and our tenure as editors underway, including the preceding editors-in-chief, Angela (...)
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  5.  4
    "Loose Bits of Paper" and "Uncorrect Thoughts": Hume's Early Memoranda in Context.Emilio Mazza & Gianluca Mori - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):9-60.
    What are the Early Memoranda?1 When were they written? What are their sources? What is their purpose and their relation to Hume's works? These questions, usually addressed separately, are in fact tightly interwoven: they require an articulated response that embraces them all. Our response could be summarised as follows: far from being current reading notes, or even less the exhaustive diary of Hume's intellectual experience, the Early Memoranda are most likely second-tier texts, or—as James Harris recently conjectured—"notes taken from notes."2 (...)
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  6.  6
    Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment Ed. By Elizabeth Robinson and Chris W. Suprenant.Peter Thielke - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):252-254.
    Given Kant's seemingly dismissive attitude toward Scottish philosophers of common sense—in the Prolegomena, he famously describes how painful it is to see them miss Hume's point—one might expect that a book titled Kant and the Scottish Enlightenment would be a rather slim volume. However, as Manfred Kuehn in Scottish Common Sense in Germany and elsewhere has made abundantly clear, Scottish philosophy played a large role in eighteenth-century Germany, and was a significant influence on Kant. The present volume, which stands as (...)
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  7.  3
    The Impact of David Hume's Thoughts About Race for His Stance on Slavery and His Concept of Religion.Andre C. Willis - 2019 - Hume Studies 42 (1):213-239.
    In March 2010, Professor Tom Devine, widely acknowledged as the leading academic historian of Scotland, presented a plenary lecture for the Royal Society of Edinburgh's yearly symposium, "Connections between Scotland and Slavery." Publicly advertised as a reply to the question "Did Slavery Make Scotland Great?" Devine's talk was eagerly anticipated by the group of international scholars gathered at the University of Edinburgh. His answer, however, may have been more controversial than the audience anticipated. Devine said that the economic transformation of (...)
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