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  1.  5
    The Rise and Fall of Scottish Common Sense Realism by Douglas McDermid.Deborah Boyle - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):107-109.
    This rich and interesting book tells the story of the development and ultimate disappearance over the course of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries of a central theme in Scottish philosophy: common sense realism. Taking Thomas Reid's version of common sense realism as the paradigmatic form, McDermid shows how Reid's views had their roots in Lord Kames's account of perceptual realism, how Dugald Stewart and Sir William Hamilton defended and modified Reid's view, and how James Ferrier systematically repudiated both Reid's appeal (...)
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  2.  4
    The Dual Account of Reason and the Spirit of Philosophy in Hume's Treatise.Erik W. Matson - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):29-56.
  3.  2
    David Hume on Morals, Politics, and Society Ed. By Angela Coventry and Andrew Valls. [REVIEW]Naohito Mori - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):110-112.
    This is a fascinating collection of Hume's texts and essays by experts on Hume. It introduces students and general readers to a panorama of his moral and political philosophy in a readable and informative way. The collection consists of the following sections: Introduction by Andrew Valls, Index of Names, "Texts," and "Essays." The texts include the entirety of An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, and selected essays from "Essays, Moral, Political, and Literary." This is followed by four "interpretive essays" (...)
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  4.  12
    Hume's Purely Practical Response to Philosophical Skepticism.Nathan I. Sasser - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):3-28.
  5.  2
    Hume's Sceptical Enlightenment by Ryu Susato.Spyridon Tegos - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):103-106.
    Ryu Susato's book is a comprehensive assessment of Hume's thought that defies usual labels and categorizations while operating in an unprecedented interdisciplinary spirit. It is slightly iconoclastic on two levels: from a Hume-studies point of view, Susato contextualizes Hume's oeuvre as a dynamic and ultimately unclassifiable whole within its 18th century context. In this sense, this book is an idiosyncratic follow up on the recent, path-breaking intellectual biography of Hume given by James Harris. In the same vein, 21st century labels (...)
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