Environmental Philosophy

ISSN: 1718-0198

25 found

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  1.  28
    On the Dubious Merit of Ontologizing Bohr.Robert Booth - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):289-318.
    Despite thinking that an appropriately nonanthropocentric approach to the more-than-human world requires understanding phenomena to be ontologically basic, Karen Barad engages with phenomenology only fleetingly. Here, I suggest that Barad ought to take Maurice Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology more seriously for two reasons. First, Barad’s objections to his prospects for a suitably nonanthropocentric phenomenology rely upon a misdirected charge of representationalism. Second, Merleau-Ponty offers theoretical and methodological tools corrective to our tendencies toward metaphysical and behavioral colonialism which align with Barad’s project, yet, (...)
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  2.  16
    Zoltán Boldizsár Simon. The Epochal Event.Forrest Clingerman - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):343-345.
  3.  30
    From the Dialectic of Power to the Posthumanist Sublime.Chad Córdova - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):215-236.
    This essay rereads the Kantian sublime both as an epitome of humanism and as a lesson for posthumanist thought. First, I unfold “On the Dynamically Sublime” as a failed dialectic in which “reason” seeks to sublate the power of “nature.” But Kant’s sublime is irreducible to the “Analytic,” I argue: it exemplifies a quasi-dialectical relation between human and nonhuman that recurs across the third Critique and defines its humanist teleology as a whole. Rereading Kant against that telos, and heeding the (...)
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  4.  16
    Henry Dicks. The Biomimicry Revolution.Alessio Gerola - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):324-328.
  5.  20
    Dalia Nassar. Romantic Empiricism.Fraser Gray - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):338-342.
  6.  13
    Simon P. James. How Nature Matters.Tom Greaves - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):333-337.
  7.  17
    Dipesh Chakrabarty. One Planet, Many Worlds.Joshua Jones - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):319-323.
  8.  48
    The Existential Threat of Climate Change.Johanna Oksala - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):191-214.
    The article analyzes the experience of climate anxiety. The investigation is phenomenological in the sense that I will attempt to show that contemporary climate anxiety has a distinctive structure and philosophical meaning, which make it different from both psychological anxiety and existential anxiety, as commonly understood. I will also draw out the consequences of my phenomenological analysis for climate politics. My contention is that forms of prefigurative climate politics can respond to the profound disorientation and apathy regarding our future and (...)
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  9. On the Concept of Independent Nature.J. Michael Scoville - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):237-265.
    Multiple concepts of nature are at play in environmental theory and practice. One that has gripped several theorists is the idea of nature as referring to that which is independent of humans and human activity. This concept has been subject to forceful criticism, notably in the recent work of Steven Vogel. After clarifying problematic and promising ways of charac­terizing independent nature, I engage Vogel’s critique. While the critique is compelling in certain respects, I argue that it fails to appreciate what (...)
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  10.  25
    Of Imaginaries, Places, and Fences.Jared L. Talley - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):267-287.
    We are in places. Some places beckon us, some are to be avoided, and some are banal. However, this emplacement urges reflection. In this essay I consider the role of place in environmental experiences, beginning with analysis of the concepts of place and space that motivate the development of four environmental imaginaries (extractive, wilderness, managed, and reciprocal). Ultimately, through a discussion of fences, I aim to show how place-meanings are materially inscribed on the landscape while evidencing the value of place-based (...)
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  11.  16
    Luke Fischer and David Macauley, eds. The Seasons: Philosophical, Literary, and Environmental Perspectives.T. T. Wright - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (2):329-332.
  12.  9
    Loving Orphaned Space: The Art and Science of Belonging to Earth.Isabelle Bishop - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):187-189.
  13.  11
    Thinking Like an Iceberg.Lanbin Feng - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):170-173.
  14.  10
    A Hegelian Perspective on Nature Recognition.Simon Nørgaard Iversen - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):95-126.
    Recent posthuman theories of nature recognition seek to move beyond Hegel’s anthropological starting point. This article serves as a critical rejoinder to such posthuman attempts by taking aim at posthumanism’s flat ontology and concept of agency. Instead, it is suggested that a genuine Hegelian starting point is better suited to discern the complex interrelationship between the human and nonhuman. It is argued that a Hegelian theory of recognition that takes Hegel’s Philosophy of Nature and Philosophy of Mind into consideration can (...)
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  15.  25
    Becoming-Bonsai, Becoming-Carer.Jayson Jimenez - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):1-24.
    This essay reflects on my academic work and personal experience as a bonsai enthusiast. Specifically, I plan to point out how Deleuzian theory informs my bonsai practice. First, I situate bonsai gardening as an encounter with the vegetal world. Then I consider this encounter as a form of Deleuzian becoming. Becoming reifies a transformation of the two species to become another version of itself—one that occurs between a bonsai and its carer. As a bonsai carer myself, I find becoming as (...)
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  16.  15
    Indigenous Eco-Apocalypticism.Monika Kaup - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):25-53.
    Davi Kopenawa and Bruce Albert’s 2010 collaborative work, The Falling Sky: Words of a Yanomami Shaman, centers on a prophetic warning of impending apocalyptic collapse due to anthropogenic environmental destruction. An indigenous contribution to the contemporary burst of eco-apocalyptic writing and the search for a new ecological social order, The Falling Sky challenges the temporal vector of Euroamerican eco-apocalypticism. Instead of the teleological axis of anthropocentric temporality (the emergence of homo sapiens as the pinnacle of evolution), it refers us to (...)
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  17.  8
    Wild Diplomacy: Cohabiting with Wolves on a New Ontological Map.Ben Larsen - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):183-186.
  18.  21
    Ways of Being Alive.Shoshana McIntosh - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):174-177.
  19.  6
    Melancholic Joy: On Life Worth Living.Anna Myers - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):159-162.
  20.  15
    Environmental Philosophy, Esotericism, and Disenchantment.Olli Pitkänen - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):73-94.
    Sean McGrath has produced an interesting interpretation of Renaissance Hermeticism in the context of environmental philosophy. By recovering this esoteric current he combines deep ecological criticism of anthropocentrism with humanistic critique of one-sidedly ecocentric views. After summarizing McGrath’s position and arguing for its profound potential, I will point out a problem in McGrath’s use of one of his key conceptions: disenchantment. Countering McGrath, I argue that the conception of disenchantment is not suitable for distinguishing overly ideological or superficial forms of (...)
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  21.  15
    Adorno on the Possibility of Nature.Michael J. Reno - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):55-71.
    I present an interpretation of Adorno’s concept of nature that prompts a confrontation with both the domination of nature and the romanticization of nature. This interpretation would situate a normative stance toward human engagement with nature not in the idealization of a pre-social or pre-human nature, but in the (missed) possibilities of past human engagements with non-human nature. Experience of art, such as Edward Burtynsky’s photography, can push us toward such a stance. This stance forces a reconsideration of the dominant (...)
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  22. Review of The Imaginary of Animals by Annabelle Dufourcq. [REVIEW]Chandler D. Rogers - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):163-169.
  23.  5
    A Black Forest Walden.Lewis Rosenberg - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):178-182.
  24.  23
    Animal Revolution. [REVIEW]Sara Louise Tonge - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):155-158.
  25.  27
    Naturalizing Value and Hegel’s Notion of the Impotence of Nature.Ana Vieyra - 2023 - Environmental Philosophy 20 (1):127-154.
    In this paper I suggest an alternative reading of the value of Hegel’s systematic approach to nature from the perspective of environmental philosophy. Taking the paradigmatic example of the “new materialist” ontologies, I present the problems with an inflationary justification for the argument for the need of a shift in the “scientific” representation of nature. On the basis of these problems, I suggest that Hegel’s view of nature as axiologically impotent sheds light into why emancipatory environmental theory needs not hinge (...)
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