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  1.  3
    A Rose by Any Other Name….Paolo C. Biondi - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (2):239-282.
    The question of how, according to Aristotle, the principles of science are acquired remains contested among scholars. An aspect of this broader topic concerns the role of induction, and whether it is able to provide us with knowledge of natural necessity without the assistance of intuition. In a recent publication in this journal, David Botting argues in favour of the enumerative/empiricist interpretation of induction and criticizes the intuitive/rationalist interpretation of it, a version of which was defended in one of my (...)
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  2.  1
    Wolterstorff on Reid’s Notion of Common Sense.Petr Glombíček - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (2):221-238.
    The paper addresses a mainstream contemporary view of the notion of common sense in Thomas Reid’s philosophy, as proposed by Nicholas Wolterstorff who claims that Reid was not clear about the concept of common sense, or about the principles of common sense. In contrast, this paper presents Reid’s conception as a clear and traditional Aristotelian notion of common sense and its principles as presuppositions of particular sense judgments, usually taken for granted. The alleged confusion about principles is resolved by a (...)
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  3.  4
    Confusion or Precision?Lukáš Novák - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (2):151-200.
    This paper is an attempt to explicate, using the method of conceptual reconstruction rather than historical, text-oriented analysis, the plurality of meanings of two connected terms that play an important role in scholastic thought: “confusio” and “praecisio”. These terms are used in a plurality of meanings by the scholastics, and sometimes even in one and the same context. The aim of this paper is to disentangle these various meanings from each other, offer their precise definitions and explore not only their (...)
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  4.  4
    A Logic of Creating.Walter B. Redmond - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (2):201-219.
    I describe a “logic of creating” inspired by the “existential” argument of the existence of God in St. Thomas Aquinas’s De Ente et Essentia. suggest a modal reading of his reasoning based upon states-of-affairs said to be actual, contingent, necessary and the like. I take “creating” as teasing actuality out of possibility. After explaining the modal logic that I am assuming and relating it to Christian understandings of meaning and being, I present my modal interpretation, contrasting it with the views (...)
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  5.  2
    Scotist Metaphysics in Mid-Sixteenth Century Padua Giacomino Malafossa From Barge’s A Question on the Subject of Metaphysics.Claus A. Andersen - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (1):69-107.
    For more than four decades around the middle of the sixteenth century, Giacomino Malafossa from Barge held the Scotist chair of metaphysics at the University of Padua. In his A Question on the Subject of Metaphysics, in Which Is Included the Question, Whether Metaphysics Is a Science, he developed a remarkable stance on the subject matter of metaphysics. Metaphysics has two objects: being qua being and God. However, only when it deals with the latter object can it be said to (...)
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  6.  6
    Analogy of Disjunction.Domenic D’Ettore - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (1):7-33.
    At the beginning of his influential De Nominum Analogia, Thomas de Vio Cajetan mentions three mistaken positions on analogy. He does not attach names to these positions, but each one was held by distinguished Thomists of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Furthermore, their proponents were responding to the same set of challenges from John Duns Scotus that set the agenda for the De Nominum Analogia. In this paper, I would like to do something that Cajetan did not do, and that (...)
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  7.  1
    Late Scholastic Analyses of Inductive Reasoning.Miroslav Hanke - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (1):35-66.
    The late scholastic era was, among others, contemporary to the “emergence of probability”, the German academic philosophy from Leibniz to Kant, and the introduction of Newtonian physics. Within this era, two branches of the late-scholastic analysis of induction can be identified, one which can be thought of as a continual development of earlier scholastic approaches, while the other one absorbed influences of early modern philosophy, mathematics, and physics. Both branches of scholastic philosophy share the terminology of modalities, probability, and forms (...)
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  8.  6
    A Question on the Subject of Metaphysics in Which Is Included the Question Whether Metaphysics Is a Science.Giacomino Malafossa From Barge - 2020 - Studia Neoaristotelica 17 (1):109-143.
    Giacomino Malafossa’s A Question on the Subject of Metaphysics, in Which Is Included the Question Whether Metaphysics Is a Science, from 1551 consists of two parts. In the first part, the author discusses various positions regarding the subject matter of metaphysics. In particular, he debates which conditions any scientific object must fulfill, the most important one being that an object of a science virtually contains all of its truths. Since being as being virtually contains whatever is considered in metaphysics, this (...)
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