Isis

ISSN: 0021-1753

92 found

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  1. : Victorian Science and Imagery: Representation and Knowledge in Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture.Eva Åhrén - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):417-418.
  2.  1
    : Hidden Histories of the Dead: Disputed Bodies in Modern British Medical Research.Salim Al-Gailani - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):441-442.
  3.  1
    : Reactionary Mathematics: A Genealogy of Purity.Amir Alexander - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):409-411.
  4.  2
    : The Kingdom of Darkness: Bayle, Newton, and the Emancipation of the European Mind from Philosophy.Lewis Ashman - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):400-401.
  5.  1
    : Architecture of Life: Soviet Modernism and the Human Sciences.Ekaterina Babintseva - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):431-433.
  6. : Maladies of Empire: How Colonialism, Slavery, and War Transformed Medicine.Chris Blakley - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):416-417.
  7.  1
    Thinking the Earth with the Body: How the Anatomist Nicolaus Steno (1638–1686) Read History in the Earth’s Strata.Nuno Castel-Branco - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):312-334.
    Nicolaus Steno (1638–1686) claimed that the Earth has a history that can be known by analyzing mountain strata with rules today known as Steno’s Principles of Stratigraphy. This essay argues that Steno’s research on the Earth was intrinsically related to his studies of the body. Most accounts associate Steno’s research on fossils with his dissection of a shark in the fall of 1666 in Medici Florence. Instead, the author suggests that Steno turned to the Earth after reading a manuscript about (...)
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  8.  1
    : The Science of Abolition: How Slaveholders Became the Enemies of Progress.Jean Max Charles - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):412-413.
  9. Remembrance of Auroras Past: The Enlightenment Search for Northern Lights in Historical Sources.Jin-Woo Choi - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):215-240.
    This essay examines how eighteenth-century naturalists selected, read, and used textual and visual sources of the past to construct chronologies of the aurora borealis from antiquity to their present. Frequent sightings of the northern lights in Europe from 1707 onward prompted investigations into not only their physical properties but also their historical patterns. These searches encountered a twofold problem. Because the term “aurora borealis” was a seventeenth-century neologism, the recovery of auroras avant la lettre required discerning them amid the various (...)
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  10.  1
    : DSM: A History of Psychiatry’s Bible.Catharine Coleborne - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):442-443.
  11. : The Maker of Pedigrees: Jakob Wilhelm Imhoff and the Meanings of Genealogy in Early Modern Europe.Mackenzie Cooley - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):406-407.
  12.  1
    : Wild by Design: The Rise of Ecological Restoration.Raf De Bont - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):436-437.
  13.  1
    : The Science of Life and Death in “Frankenstein.”.Michelle DiMeo - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):407-409.
  14. : Sir William Osler: An Encyclopedia.Sarah E. Naramore - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):419-420.
  15.  1
    : The Science of Bureaucracy: Risk Decision-Making and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Michael Egan - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):444-445.
  16.  1
    : Robert Paul and the Origins of British Cinema.Patrick Ellis - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):429-430.
  17.  1
    : Moving Crops and the Scales of History.Courtney Fullilove - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):394-395.
  18.  1
    : The Nature of the Future: Agriculture, Science, and Capitalism in the Antebellum North.Christopher Halm - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):413-414.
  19.  1
    : B C, Before Computers: On Information Technology from Writing to the Age of Digital Data.Hansun Hsiung - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):430-431.
  20. Over Spilt Milk: British Scientific Humanitarianism and the Quest for International Standards.Alma Igra - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):335-353.
    Humanitarian aid in Central Europe after World War I repositioned both food and food research on a global scale. This essay follows the British scientific delegation that worked in Vienna as part of the food aid program and shows how the city became a “lab” for international nutrition. Assuming a political role, British nutrition experts were motivated to collaborate with local experts. To examine what internationalism looked like in the lab, the essay reconstructs the forgotten Viennese NEM system, a scientific (...)
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  21.  1
    : Finding, Inheriting or Borrowing? The Construction and Transfer of Knowledge in Antiquity and the Middle Ages.Harun Küçük - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):399-400.
  22.  2
    : How the Clinic Made Gender: The Medical History of a Transformative Idea.Greta LaFleur - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):437-438.
  23.  5
    : The Science of Reading: Information, Media, and Mind in Modern America.Andrew S. Lea - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):428-429.
  24.  1
    : Diet for a Large Planet: Industrial Britain, Food Systems, and World Ecology.Victoria Lee - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):422-423.
  25. : China’s Cold War Science Diplomacy.Yi-Tang Lin - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):440-441.
  26. : Horizons: The Global Origins of Modern Science.Christine Y. L. Luk - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):397-398.
  27.  3
    Eloge: Roger H. Stuewer (1934–2022).Alberto A. Martinez - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):385-388.
  28. : A Race for the Future: Scientific Visions of Modern Russian Jewishness.Ian McGonigle - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):420-421.
  29. : Showcasing Science: A History of Teylers Museum in the Nineteenth Century.Ilja Nieuwland - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):411-412.
  30.  1
    : Rumphius’ Naturkunde: Zirkulation in Kolonialen Wissensräumen.Brooke Penaloza-Patzak - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):402-403.
  31. Brazilian Dromedaries: A History of Acclimatization, Agricultural Modernization, and Camelids, 1857–1867.David Francisco de Moura Penteado - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):241-266.
    Ideas, knowledge, people, and animals were in rapid transit in the nineteenth century, occasionally at the same time. This essay analyzes the unsuccessful government-sponsored experiment to introduce and naturalize dromedaries (Camelus dromedarius) in the northeastern Brazilian province of Ceará between 1857 and 1867. While the scheme is not unknown, it has not yet received a dedicated and thorough examination. Using the lenses of the global exchange of knowledge, transnational scientific enterprises, the history of camelids, and the worldwide phenomenon of acclimatization, (...)
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  32. Eloge: Mary Terrall (1952–2023).Ted Porter & Norton Wise - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):389-390.
  33.  1
    : Desperate Remedies: Psychiatry’s Turbulent Quest to Cure Mental Illness.Shilpi Rajpal - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):421-422.
  34.  2
    Eloge: Juan José Saldaña González (1944–2022).María de la Paz Ramos-Lara & Luis Carlos Arboleda Aparicio - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):391-393.
  35. : Imagined Geographies in the Mediterranean, Middle East, and Beyond.Emilie Savage-Smith - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):395-397.
  36. : Kopf und Herz: Die Forschungspraxis von Johann Gustav Droysen.Christoph Schmitt - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):415-416.
  37.  1
    : Pollution Is Colonialism.Awadhendra Sharan - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):433-434.
  38.  1
    : Knowledge Flows in a Global Age: A Transnational Approach.Youjung Shin - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):434-435.
  39. Musk and the Making of Macromolecules: Perfumes and Polymers in the History of Organic Chemistry.Galina Shyndriayeva - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):292-311.
    Musks, the foundation of many perfumes, as well as other ingredients of perfumes, were critical objects of study for establishing theoretical concepts about large ring chemical compounds and polymerization in the 1920s and 1930s. Because fragrance chemistry has been underdeveloped in the historiography, doubtless partly because it has become associated with the feminine, this has been ignored in the historiography. This essay highlights the strategic importance of perfume research, looking in particular at the work of Leopold Ružičkač, 1939 Nobel laureate (...)
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  40. : Nature’s Laboratory: Environmental Thought and Labor Radicalism in Chicago, 1886–1937.Kendra Smith-Howard - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):426-427.
  41. : Physico-Theology: Religion and Science in Europe, 1650–1750.Stephen D. Snobelen - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):403-406.
  42. Demarcating a Pure Land: CFido as a Cyberspace for Computer Amateurs in 1990s China.Wen-Ching Sung, Chen-Pang Yeang & Zhixiang Cheng - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):267-291.
    The bulletin board system (BBS) significantly changed the production and transmission of knowledge in China’s information technology (IT). Launched in 1991, Chinese FidoNet (CFido) provided a virtual space for hobbyists to explore technology-for-fun and aggregated many future Chinese digital entrepreneurs, enabling them to experiment with business models and pursue open-source software with Chinese characters. CFido’s short history (1991–1998) also encapsulates the fast-changing dynamic between knowledge and its social context. CFido participants first perceived the BBS as a utopian “pure land” where (...)
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  43.  1
    The Product of Practices: How Natural History and Mathematical Physics Gave Meaning to Cartography’s Depth Contour Lines.Jip van Besouw - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):354-375.
    In 1730, the Dutch cartographer and meteorological observer Nicolaas Samuel Cruquius constructed a spectacular map of the river Merwede. Cruquius’s map is celebrated as one of the earliest to use lines of equal depth—or indeed any type of contour lines. So far, however, the secondary literature has paid no attention to why Cruquius created these lines or to the knowledge involved in his innovation. This essay makes three related points. First, Cruquius intentionally used lines representing equal depth in an entirely (...)
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  44. History of Science Society Annual Meeting, 2023.Jaipreet Virdi & Courtney E. Thompson - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):376-384.
  45.  3
    : Thinking with Sound: A New Program in the Sciences and Humanities around 1900.Yang Wang - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):424-425.
  46. : Desert Edens: Colonial Climate Engineering in the Age of Anxiety.Floris Winckel - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):425-426.
  47.  2
    : Forgotten Clones: The Birth of Cloning and the Biological Revolution.Doogab Yi - 2024 - Isis 115 (2):439-439.
  48.  15
    : Axiomatics: Mathematical Thought and High Modernism.Amir Alexander - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):195-197.
  49.  9
    : The Other Dark Matter: The Science and Business of Turning Waste into Wealth and Health.Nicole Elizabeth Barnes - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):186-187.
  50.  7
    : A Global Enlightenment: Western Progress and Chinese Science.Emily Baum - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):185-186.
  51.  9
    Kristie I. Macrakis (1958–2022).Mario Bianchini - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):164-165.
  52.  11
    Placing Insects in Histories of Science.Diogo de Carvalho Cabral & Frederico Freitas - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):136-140.
    This essay considers insects’ place-making powers in history of science topics. Insects have co-shaped the geographies of knowledge production throughout history in three primary dimensions: through their size, density, and multiplane existence. Insects’ miniature worlds have helped humans to create trans-scale analogies. Their spatial transgression and swarming capacity have overwhelmed people, including field researchers, contributing to the making of the places where science is produced. Finally, insects’ “ontologically alien” ways of engaging with environments (e.g., flying and living underground) have offered (...)
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  53.  6
    : Split and Splice: A Phenomenology of Experimentation.Elizabeth Cavicchi - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):213-214.
  54.  9
    : Brown Skins, White Coats: Race Science in India, 1920–66.Pratik Chakrabarti - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):202-203.
  55.  4
    : Dr. Nurse: Science, Politics, and the Transformation of American Nursing.Cynthia Connolly - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):207-208.
  56.  3
    : Mathematics, Metrology, and Model Contracts: A Codex from Late Antique Business Education.Serafina Cuomo - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):178-179.
  57.  30
    Ian Macdougall Hacking (1936–2023).Lorraine Daston - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):170-174.
  58.  9
    : Knowing Manchuria: Environments, the Senses, and Natural Knowledge on an Asian Borderland.Yuting Dong - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):175-176.
  59.  5
    : Nature’s Diplomats: Science, Internationalism, and Preservation, 1920–1960.Andrea Duffy - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):201-202.
  60.  9
    Technical Chronology and Computus Naturalis in Twelfth-Century Lotharingia: A New Source.C. Philipp E. Nothaft - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):65-83.
    Recent research has shown that the use of astronomy as a chronological problem-solving tool has deep roots in the scholarly practices of the Latin Middle Ages, as is manifest from the writings of Marianus Scotus, Gerland, and other “critical computists” of the eleventh and twelfth centuries. This essay enlarges the existing picture by introducing a hitherto unknown epistolary treatise of the mid-twelfth century. Written in Lotharingia in 1144, this poorly preserved work documents an attempt to reconstruct the timeline of world (...)
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  61.  10
    : Killer Instinct: The Popular Science of Human Nature in Twentieth-Century America.Rachel E. Walker - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):209-211.
  62.  6
    : Neuromatic; or, A Particular History of Religion and the Brain.Steve Fuller - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):176-177.
  63.  17
    Experts of Identity: Race, Ethnicity, and Science in India, 1910s–1940s.Sayori Ghoshal - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):84-104.
    During 1910s–1940s, Indian intellectuals developed physical anthropology as a modern nationalist discipline for the subcontinent. Through their contributions, they sought to construct themselves as disciplinary experts. To legitimize their expertise, even while they remained colonized subjects, Indian anthropologists foregrounded their research as more scientific than that of the colonial administrators. This claim of being better equipped to study the subcontinent’s anthropological diversity was based on the Indian anthropologists’ purported familiarity with the region’s culture and history. This essay shows how their (...)
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  64.  10
    A Collection Ecologies Forum: Reevaluating Insects as Archives.Dominik Huenniger, Karina Lucas Silva-Brandão, Christian Reiß & Xiaoya Zhan - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):157-163.
    Insects reevaluated as archives foreground possible sites of multidisciplinary research, with multifaceted potential for the history of science. With different disciplinary approaches to the study of small animals and the production of collections, the history of science, archaeology, environmental history, and natural history are brought into conversation in this forum on “Collection Ecologies.” This exchange about collections as a web of relationships entailing regimes of value, epistemes of logistics, and bureaucratic and scientific practices explores how multidisciplinary knowledge of “natural” bodies (...)
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  65.  10
    : The Land Beneath the Ice: The Pioneering Years of Radar Exploration in Antarctica.Nanna Katrine Lüders Kaalund - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):211-212.
  66.  15
    Humanists Hate Math: Certainty, Dubitability, and Tradition in Descartes’s Rules.Abram Kaplan - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):23-45.
    Descartes’s arguments about the certainty of mathematics in the Rules for the Direction of the Mind cannot be understood independently of his attack on the authority of ancient authors. The author maintains this view by reading Descartes’s claims about mathematics through the lens of status theory, a framework for disputation revived by Renaissance dialecticians. Within status theory, “certainty” was closely associated with consensus. The essay shows how Descartes used status to attack the authority of the ancient authors and elevate mathematics (...)
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  67.  4
    : Science for Governing Japan’s Population.Sujin Lee - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):194-195.
  68.  7
    : Mao’s Bestiary: Medicinal Animals and Modern China.Yan Liu - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):208-209.
  69.  9
    : Psychic Investigators: Anthropology, Modern Spiritualism, and Credible Witnessing in the Late Victorian Age.Roger Luckhurst - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):187-188.
  70.  6
    Ways of Knowing a Former Insect.Leah Lui-Chivizhe & Jude Philp - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):147-151.
    What are the benefits of liberating museum objects from their colonial frames of reference to reincorporate them into Indigenous ways of knowing? As curators working together with Torres Strait Islanders to interpret museum objects, the authors focus on collected items relating to centipedes acquired during the experimental era of scientific investigation by a zoologist and an ethnographer in eastern Zenadth Kes, the Torres Strait waters between northern Australia and Papua New Guinea. In the scientific sphere, the centipede Scolopendra existed for (...)
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  71.  11
    : Ladies of Honor and Merit: Gender, Useful Knowledge, and Politics in Enlightened Spain.Darina Martykánová - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):179-180.
  72.  6
    Zvipukanana: “Tiny Animals with No Bones”.Clapperton Chakanetsa Mavhunga - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):141-146.
    Summoning insights from dzimbahwe cultures of knowing—specifically indigenous ways of seeing, thinking, knowing, and doing as archived in local languages—this essay will first argue that the word “insect” did not exist among the author’s ancestors before the colonial moment and is too light and narrow to account for their sciences and what they did with and through them. Second, it proposes indigenous concepts that more adequately capture meanings of and human actions toward flying, crawling, burrowing, and swimming tiny animals, possible (...)
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  73.  8
    : Seduced by Radium: How Industry Transformed Science in the American Marketplace.Maika Nakao - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):197-198.
  74.  14
    : Einstein, Eddington, and the Eclipse: Travel Impressions.Tiffany Nichols - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):198-199.
  75.  10
    Introduction: Expanded Perspectives on Tiny Animals as Epistemic Agents.Lisa Onaga & Dominik Huenniger - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):126-130.
    The essays in this Focus section expand the notion of writing insect histories of science by attending to matters of space and scale, ecological relationships, and institutional silences. They magnify diverse understandings about how the worlds of insects are noticed and understood by humans, what has historically counted as “insect,” and who narrates histories (of science). In doing so, the collection offers methodological suggestions for studying tiny animals in history that broaden the scope of often overlapping material, cultural, linguistic, political, (...)
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  76.  10
    “Ambivalent Insects” as Tools and Targets.Lisa Onaga & Luísa Reis-Castro - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):152-156.
    The binary categories of harm and benefit have often shaped how historians frame discussions of insects. Scientists also leverage the binary framing of insects as tools and targets to carry out their work, especially in the development of biological technologies for pest control. This essay emphasizes how binaries function in scientific practice. Two case studies spanning from the twentieth century to the recent past illustrate the shift away from chemicals in pest management and, in doing so, show the instability of (...)
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  77.  8
    : Tycho Brahe and the Measure of the Heavens.Emma Perkins - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):181-182.
  78.  6
    : Listening to British Nature: Wartime, Radio, and Modern Life, 1914–1945.Helen Piel - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):199-201.
  79.  5
    Profession of Revulsion: Subjective Science and the Mobilization of Emotions in Late Nineteenth-Century Russian Public Medicine.Maria Pirogovskaya - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):105-125.
    This essay explores the rhetoric used by Russian zemstvo physicians, scholars of medicine, and sanitary inspectors to share their expertise with regard to health problems in the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Borrowing the conceptual framework of emotional practices introduced by Monique Scheer, it interprets an appeal to revulsion and sensorial evidence, employed as “templates of language and gesture,” that medical practitioners produced both to mobilize the emotions of their audience and to support their own professional stature. The (...)
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  80.  9
    : Stone Breaker: The Poet James Gates Percival and the Beginning of Geology in New England.Lily Santoro - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):183-184.
  81.  10
    : Crossing the Boundaries of Life: Günter Blobel and the Origins of Molecular Cell Biology.Caterina Schürch - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):204-205.
  82.  7
    : Victorian Alchemy: Science, Magic, and Ancient Egypt.Kathleen Sheppard - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):190-191.
  83.  10
    White Ants: Biotic Borders to Biocultural Frontiers.Jeannie N. Shinozuka & Rohan Deb Roy - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):131-135.
    Establishing biotic borders was part and parcel of empire building. The question of which kinds of biological species were permitted to make their way into North American and West European territories shaped transregional border control in the imperial age. Biotic borders were intensely biocultural in that stereotypes around race and ethnic differences shaped them. Drawing on examples from the history of white ants (also known as termites) in the American and British empires, this essay argues that insects had a sustained (...)
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  84.  17
    : Meat, Mercy, and Morality: Animals and Humanitarianism in Colonial Bengal, 1850–1920.Shira Shmuely - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):193-194.
  85.  9
    Michael Hoskin (1930–2021).Robert W. Smith - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):166-169.
  86.  5
    : Alexander Williamson: A Victorian Chemist and the Making of Modern Japan.Akihito Suzuki - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):191-192.
  87.  15
    : The Incomparable Monsignor: Francesco Bianchini’s World of Science, History, and Court Intrigue.Elena Taddei - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):182-183.
  88.  19
    : The Lab Book: Situated Practices in Media Studies.Sjang ten Hagen - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):212-213.
  89. Logical Positivism: The History of a “Caricature”.Sander Verhaegh - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):46-64.
    Logical positivism is often characterized as a set of naive doctrines on meaning, method, and metaphysics. In recent decades, however, historians have dismissed this view as a gross misinterpretation. This new scholarship raises a number of questions. When did the standard reading emerge? Why did it become so popular? And how could commentators have been so wrong? This essay reconstructs the history of a “caricature” and rejects the hypothesis that it was developed by ill-informed Anglophone scholars who failed to appreciate (...)
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  90.  14
    : Planning Democracy: Modern India’s Quest for Development.Kena Wani - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):205-206.
  91.  14
    : Reading the Book of Nature: How Eight Best Sellers Reconnected Christianity and the Sciences on the Eve of the Victorian Age.Elizabeth Yale - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):189-190.
  92.  21
    Fossils and Sovereignty: Science Diplomacy and the Politics of Deep Time in the Sino-American Fossil Dispute of the 1920s.Hsiao-pei Yen - 2024 - Isis 115 (1):1-22.
    In the early twentieth century, with the development of Western scientific imperialism, Asia, South America, and Africa became sites for Western scientific exploration. Many paleontological specimens, including dinosaur bones, were discovered in China by foreign scientists and explorers and exported to museums in France, Sweden, and the United States. After the establishment of the Nationalist Government in Nanjing in 1927, anti-imperialist Chinese intellectuals attempted to prevent foreigners from exporting specimens unearthed on Chinese territory. In the summer of 1928, the fossils (...)
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