Bioethics

ISSN: 0269-9702

19 found

View year:

  1.  17
    Translational bioethics: Reflections on what it can be and how it should work.Kristine Bærøe - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):187-195.
    Translational ethics (TE) has been developed into a specific approach, which revolves around the argument that strategies for bridging the theory‐practice gap in bioethics must themselves be justified on ethical terms. This version of TE incorporates normative, empirical and foundational ethics research and continues to develop through application and in the face of new ethical challenges. Here, I explore the idea that the academic field of bioethics has not yet sufficiently analysed its own philosophical foundation for how it can, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2.  11
    The myth of translational bioethics.Michael Dunn & Mark Sheehan - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):196-203.
    In recent years, the case has been made for special attention to be paid to a branch of research in the field of bioethics called ‘translational bioethics’. In this paper, we start by considering some of the assumptions that those advancing translational approaches to bioethics make about bioethics and compare them to the reality of bioethics as an academic field. We move on to explain how those who make this case, implicitly or explicitly, for translational bioethics go awry because of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  10
    Developing translational bioethics—Suggestions for ways forward.Lucy Frith - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):204-212.
    This paper will take as its starting point the premise that developing translational bioethics is a worthwhile endeavour. I will develop an account of translational bioethics and discuss what implications this would have for the wider discipline of bioethics and argue that this would be a useful development for bioethics. The paper will conduct a form of ‘translational meta‐bioethics analysis’, in the words of Bærøe. I will argue that if we are serious about instituting translational bioethics, then it will need (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  12
    Translating theories of justice into a practice model for triage of scarce intensive care resources during a pandemic.Kathrin Knochel, Eva-Maria Schmolke, Lukas Meier & Alena Buyx - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):223-232.
    During the COVID‐19 pandemic, national triage guidelines were developed to address the anticipated shortage of life‐saving resources, should ICU capacities be overloaded. Rationing and triage imply that in addition to individual patient interests, interests of population health have to be integrated. The transfer of theoretical and empirical knowledge into feasible and useful practice models and their implementation in clinical settings need to be improved. This paper analyzes how triage protocols could translate abstract theories of distributive justice into concrete material and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5.  12
    From book to bedside? A critical perspective on the debate about “translational bioethics”.Alexander Kremling, Jan Schildmann & Marcel Mertz - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):177-186.
    The concept of “translational bioethics” has received considerable attention in recent years. Most publications draw an analogy to translational medicine and describe bioethical research that aims at implementing and evaluating ethical interventions. However, current accounts of translational bioethics are often rather vague and seem to differ with regard to conceptual and methodological assumptions. It is not clear and scarcely analyzed what exactly “translation” in the field of bioethics means, in particular regarding goals and processes so that it is justified to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  12
    Translational bioethics as a two‐way street. Developing clinical ethics support instruments with and for healthcare practitioners.Suzanne Metselaar - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):233-240.
    This article discusses an approach to translational bioethics (TB) that is concerned with the adaptation—or ‘translation’—of concepts, theories and methods from bioethics to practical contexts, in order to support ‘non-bioethicists’, such as researchers and healthcare practitioners, in dealing with their ethical issues themselves. Specifically, it goes into the participatory development of clinical ethics support (CES) instruments that respond to the needs and wishes of healthcare practitioners and that are tailored to the specific care contexts in which they are to be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  12
    Translational bioethics.Jordan A. Parsons, Pamela Cairns & Jonathan Ives - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):173-176.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  15
    Translational or translationable? A call for ethno‐immersion in (empirical) bioethics research.Jordan A. Parsons, Harleen Kaur Johal, Joshua Parker & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):252-261.
    The shift towards "empirical bioethics" was largely triggered by a recognition that stakeholders' views and experiences are vital in ethical analysis where one hopes to produce practicable recommendations. Such perspectives can provide a rich resource in bioethics scholarship, perhaps challenging the researcher's perspective. However, overreliance on a picture painted by a group of research participants—or on pre‐existing literature in that field—can lead to a biased view of a given context, as the subjectivity of data generated in these ways cannot (and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Providing ethics advice in a pandemic, in theory and in practice: A taxonomy of ethics advice.James Wilson, Jack Hume, Cian O'Donovan & Melanie Smallman - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):213-222.
    The pandemic significantly raised the stakes for the translation of bioethics insights into policy. The novelty, range and sheer quantity of the ethical problems that needed to be addressed urgently within public policy were unprecedented and required high‐bandwidth two‐way transfer of insights between academic bioethics and policy. Countries such as the United Kingdom, which do not have a National Ethics Committee, faced particular challenges in how to facilitate this. This paper takes as a case study the brief career of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  10
    Medical ethics education as translational bioethics.Peter D. Young, Andrew N. Papanikitas & John Spicer - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (3):262-269.
    We suggest that in the particular context of medical education, ethics can be considered in a similar way to other kinds of knowledge that are categorised and shaped by academics in the context of wider society. Moreover, the study of medical ethics education is translational in a manner loosely analogous to the study of medical education as adjunct to translational medicine. Some have suggested there is merit in the idea that much as translational research attempts to connect the laboratory scientist's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  10
    Workplace heating and gender discrimination.Andreas Albertsen & Viki M. L. Pedersen - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):107-113.
    Across Europe, countries are reducing CO2 emissions and energy demand by lowering the temperature in public office buildings. These measures affect men and women unequally because the latter prefer and, indeed, perform better under higher temperatures than the standard temperature. Lowering the temperature thus further increases an already existing inequality. We show that the philosophical literature on discrimination provides an interesting theoretical approach to understanding such measures. On prominent understandings of what discrimination is, the policy would be considered direct discrimination (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  11
    A theory of triage.Greg Bognar - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):95-106.
    This paper provides a general framework for conceptualizing triage for intensive care unit admissions in public health emergencies such as the COVID‐19 pandemic. It applies this framework to some of the guidelines issued during the pandemic and addresses some controversial issues, including the role of age, the use of lives or life years, and the relevance of quality of life considerations. The paper defends a view on which triage protocols for public health emergencies should aim to maximize the number of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  9
    Therapeutic misunderstandings in modern research.Sarah Heynemann, Wendy Lipworth, Sue-Anne McLachlan, Jennifer Philip, Tom John & Ian Kerridge - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):138-152.
    Clinical trials play a crucial role in generating evidence about healthcare interventions and improving outcomes for current and future patients. For individual trial participants, however, there are inevitably trade‐offs involved in clinical trial participation, given that trials have traditionally been designed to benefit future patient populations rather than to offer personalised care. Failure to understand the distinction between research and clinical care and the likelihood of benefit from participation in clinical trials has been termed the ‘therapeutic misconception’. The evolution of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  13
    How Moral Bioenhancement Affects Perceived Praiseworthiness.Simon Lucas, Thomas Douglas & Nadira S. Faber - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):129–137.
    Psychological literature indicates that actions performed with the assistance of cognition‐enhancing biomedical technologies are often deemed to be less praiseworthy than similar actions performed without such assistance. This study examines (i) whether this result extends to the bioenhancement of moral capacities, and (ii) if so, what explains the effect of moral bioenhancement on perceived praiseworthiness. The findings indicate that actions facilitated by morally bioenhanced individuals are considered less deserving of praise than similar actions facilitated by ‘traditional’ moral enhancement—for example, moral (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  7
    Building solidarity during COVID‐19 and HIV/AIDS.Michael Montess - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):121-128.
    While the WHO, public health experts, and political leaders have referenced solidarity as an important part of our responses to COVID‐19, I consider how we build solidarity during pandemics in order to improve the effectiveness of our responses. I use Prainsack and Buyx's definition of solidarity, which highlights three different tiers: (1) interpersonal solidarity, (2) group solidarity, and (3) institutional solidarity. Each tier of solidarity importantly depends on the actions and norms established at the lower tiers. Although empathy and solidarity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  9
    Developing a living lab in ethics: Initial issues and observations.Eric Racine, Bénédicte D'Anjou, Clara Dallaire, Vincent Dumez, Caroline Favron-Godbout, Anne Hudon, Marjorie Montreuil, Catherine Olivier, Ariane Quintal & Vanessa Chenel - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):153-163.
    Living labs are interdisciplinary and participatory initiatives aimed at bringing research closer to practice by involving stakeholders in all stages of research. Living labs align with the principles of participatory research methods as well as recent insights about how participatory ways of generating knowledge help to change practices in concrete settings with respect to specific problems. The participatory, open, and discussion‐oriented nature of living labs could be ideally suited to accompany ethical reflection and changes ensuing from reflection. To our knowledge, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  17
    Ethics of a pandemic of deliberate health misinformation: From abortion care to vaccines.Udo Schuklenk - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):93-94.
    <no abstract - brief excerpt> "...efforts at manipulating vulnerable populations into acting in particular ways that may not be in their best interest, has a history going back much longer. Arguably the internet turbocharged some of these efforts, but this has been happening for a long time.".
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  6
    Conspiracy theories, clinical decision‐making, and need for bioethics debate: A response to Stout.Jukka Varelius - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):164-169.
    Although people who endorse conspiracy theories related to medicine often have negative attitudes toward particular health care measures and may even shun the healthcare system in general, conspiracy theories have received rather meager attention in bioethics literature. Consequently, and given that conspiracy theorizing appears rather prevalent, it has been maintained that there is significant need for bioethics debate over how to deal with conspiracy theories. While the proposals have typically focused on the effects that unwarranted conspiracy theories have in the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19.  21
    Anti‐natalism is incompatible with Theory X.Fumitake Yoshizawa - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (2):114-120.
    The anti‐natalist philosopher David Benatar defends a position asserting that all life is harmful, and that it is, therefore, wrong to have children. In this paper, I critique Benatar's less‐discussed claim that his anti‐natalism provides solutions to population ethics problems, such as the Non‐Identity Problem, the Repugnant Conclusion, and the Mere Addition Problem, all of which are presented in Derek Parfit's Reasons and Persons. Since the publication of his Better Never to Have Been, Benatar has continued to claim that its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
 Previous issues
  
Next issues