Year:

  1.  8
    A Consequentialist Argument for Considering Age in Triage Decisions During the Coronavirus Pandemic.Matthew C. Altman - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):356-365.
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  2.  12
    The Montreal Criteria and Uterine Transplants in Transgender Women.Jacques Balayla, Pauline Pounds, Ariane Lasry, Alexander Volodarsky-Perel & Yaron Gil - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):326-330.
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  3.  6
    Getting Back to Normal.Ruth Chadwick - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):297-297.
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  4.  6
    Injustice for the Sake of Public Health: Freeing Prisoners in Portugal During the COVID‐19 Pandemic.Luis Cordeiro-Rodrigues - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):385-387.
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  5.  5
    Stopping Exploitation: Properly Remunerating Healthcare Workers for Risk in the COVID‐19 Pandemic.Alberto Giubilini & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):372-379.
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  6.  22
    Queue Questions: Ethics of COVID‐19 Vaccine Prioritization.Alberto Giubilini, Julian Savulescu & Dominic Wilkinson - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):348-355.
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  7.  8
    A Consequentialist Ethical Analysis of Federal Funding of Elective Abortions.Emile I. Gleeson & Christi J. Guerrini - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):331-336.
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  8.  9
    The Art of Mind Changing—Solidarity in Dementia Care.Aleksandra Głos - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):315-325.
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  9.  7
    Should We Accept a Higher Cost Per Health Improvement for Orphan Drugs? A Review and Analysis of Egalitarian Arguments.Niklas Juth, Martin Henriksson, Erik Gustavsson & Lars Sandman - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):307-314.
    In recent years, the issue of accepting a higher cost per health improvement for orphan drugs has been the subject of discussion in health care policy agencies and the academic literature. This article aims to provide an analysis of broadly egalitarian arguments for and against accepting higher costs per health improvement. More specifically, we aim to investigate which arguments one should agree upon putting aside and where further explorations are needed. We identify three kinds of arguments in the literature: considerations (...)
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  10.  13
    Why the Immorality of Consuming Alcohol During Pregnancy Cannot Tell Us That Abortion is Immoral: A Reply to Hendricks.Björn Lundgren - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):388-389.
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  11.  8
    Ethics, Public Health and Technology Responses to COVID‐19.Seumas Miller & Marcus Smith - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):366-371.
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  12.  7
    The Telemedical Imperative.Jordan A. Parsons - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):298-306.
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  13.  5
    Triaging Ethical Issues in the Coronavirus Pandemic: How to Prioritize Bioethics Research During Public Health Emergencies.David Shaw - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):380-384.
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  14.  8
    Cultivating Conscience: Moral Neurohabilitation of Adolescents and Young Adults with Conduct and/or Antisocial Personality Disorders.Nancy Tuck & Linda MacDonald Glenn - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (4):337-347.
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  15.  12
    The Value of Communities and Their Consent: A Communitarian Justification of Community Consent in Medical Research.Pepijn Al - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):255-261.
    Community engagement is increasingly defended as an ethical requirement for biomedical research. Some forms of community engagement involve asking the consent of community leaders prior to seeking informed consent from community members. Although community consent does not replace individual consent, it could problematically restrict the autonomy of community members by precluding them from research when community leaders withhold their permission. Community consent is therefore at odds with one of the central principles of bioethics: respecting autonomy. This raises the question as (...)
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  16.  5
    Accounting for Research Fatigue in Research Ethics.Florence Ashley - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):270-276.
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  17.  11
    Bioethics: A Primer for christiansGilbert Meilaender Wm. B. Eerdmans Press: Grand Rapids, MI, 2020. 172 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐8028‐7816‐8. $19.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Charles Camosy - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):294-295.
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  18.  5
    A Local Criterion of Fairness in Sport: Comparing the Property Advantages of Caster Semenya and Eero Mäntyranta with Implications for the Construction of Categories in Sport.Silvia Camporesi & Mika Hämäläinen - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):262-269.
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  19.  8
    There Are No in‐Principle Ethical Objections to Controlled Voluntary SARS‐CoV‐2 Infection.Dustin Crummett - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):237-245.
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  20.  7
    The Methods of Bioethics: An Essay in Meta‐Bioethics John McMillan Oxford University Press: Oxford, UK, 2018. 186 Pp., ISBN 978‐0‐19‐960375‐6. $US 60. [REVIEW]Jennifer Flynn - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):292-293.
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  21.  10
    Rethinking ‘Need’ for Clinical Support in Transgender and Gender Non‐Conforming Children Without Clinical Classification: Learning From ‘the Paper I Almost Wrote’.Edmund Horowicz - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):246-254.
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  22.  4
    Contractualist Age Rationing Under Outbreak Circumstances.Lasse Nielsen - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):229-236.
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  23.  8
    The COVID‐19 Pandemic and What Bioethics Can and Should Contribute to Health Policy Development.Udo Schuklenk & Julian Savulescu - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):227-228.
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  24.  37
    Derivative Deprivation and the Wrong of Abortion.Philip Stratton-Lake - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):277-283.
    In his ‘The Identity Objection to the future‐like‐ours argument’, Brill argues that Marquis's 'future of value' account of the wrong of abortion is still vulnerable to the identity objection—the claim that the foetus and the later person are not numerically identical, so the later person's valuable experiences are not the foetus's future experiences—even if it is conceded that the future organism, as well as the person, has experiences. This is because the organism has these experiences in a different way from (...)
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  25.  10
    A Conscious Choice: Is It Ethical to Aim for Unconsciousness at the End of Life?Antony Takla, Julian Savulescu & Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (3):284-291.
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  26.  18
    Vital Prostheses: Killing, Letting Die, and the Ethics of de‐Implantation.Sean Aas - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):214-220.
    Disconnecting a patient from artificial life support, on their request, is often if not always a matter of letting them die, not killing them—and sometimes, permissibly doing so. Stopping a patient’s heart on request, by contrast, is a kind of killing, and rarely if ever a permissible one. The difference seems to be that procedures of the first kind remove an unwanted external support for bodily functioning, rather than intervening in the body itself. What should we say, however, about cases (...)
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  27.  17
    The Differentiation Argument: If Newborns Outrank Animals, so Do Fetuses.Kyle Blanchette - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):207-213.
  28.  5
    A Critical Examination of the False Hope Harms Argument.Christopher A. Bobier - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):221-224.
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  29.  5
    The Limits of Direct Modulation of Emotion for Moral Enhancement.Mary Carman - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):192-198.
    Assuming that moral enhancement is morally permissible, I contend that a more careful theoretical treatment of emotion and the affective landscape is needed to advance both our understanding and the prospects of interventions aimed at moral enhancement. Using Douglas’ proposal for the direct modulation of counter‐moral emotions as a foil for discussion, I argue that the direct modulation of emotion fails to address underlying aspects of an agent’s psychology that will give rise to a range of counter‐moral motives beyond the (...)
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  30.  4
    COVID‐19 and Bioethics: Looking Back and Looking Forward.Ruth Chadwick - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):117-117.
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  31.  6
    Withdrawal of Intensive Care During Times of Severe Scarcity: Triage During a Pandemic Only Upon Arrival or with the Inclusion of Patients Who Are Already Under Treatment?Annette Dufner - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):118-124.
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  32.  8
    Saving the Most Lives—A Comparison of European Triage Guidelines in the Context of the COVID‐19 Pandemic.Hans-Jörg Ehni, Urban Wiesing & Robert Ranisch - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):125-134.
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  33.  5
    Critical Analysis of Communication Strategies in Public Health Promotion: An Empirical‐Ethical Study on Organ Donation in Germany.Solveig Lena Hansen, Larissa Pfaller & Silke Schicktanz - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):161-172.
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  34.  5
    Nudging for Others’ Sake: An Ethical Analysis of the Legitimacy of Nudging Healthcare Workers to Accept Influenza Immunization.Mariette Hoven - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):143-150.
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  35.  93
    Eating Meat and Not Vaccinating: In Defense of the Analogy.Ben Jones - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):135-142.
    The devastating impact of the COVID‐19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic is prompting renewed scrutiny of practices that heighten the risk of infectious disease. One such practice is refusing available vaccines known to be effective at preventing dangerous communicable diseases. For reasons of preventing individual harm, avoiding complicity in collective harm, and fairness, there is a growing consensus among ethicists that individuals have a duty to get vaccinated. I argue that these same grounds establish an analogous duty to avoid buying and (...)
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  36.  6
    Doing Right: A Practical Guide to Ethics for Medical Trainees and Physicians, 4th Edition Philip C. Hebert and Wayne Rosen Oxford University Press, New York, NY, 2020. ISBNs CA9031337A, 432 Pp. [REVIEW]Zohar Lederman - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):225-226.
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  37.  8
    ‘Too Late or Too Soon’: The Ethics of Advance Care Planning in Dementia Setting.Marta Perin, Luca Ghirotto & Ludovica De Panfilis - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):178-186.
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  38.  8
    Space Bioethics: Why We Need It and Why It Should Be a Feminist Space Bioethics.Konrad Szocik - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):187-191.
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  39.  12
    Nudging for Others’ Sake: An Ethical Analysis of the Legitimacy of Nudging Healthcare Workers to Accept Influenza Immunization.Mariette van den Hoven - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):143-150.
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  40.  6
    The Ethics of Grandfather Clauses in Healthcare Resource Allocation.Gry Wester, Leah Zoe Gibson Rand, Christine Lu & Mark Sheehan - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):151-160.
    A grandfather clause is a provision whereby an old rule continues to apply to some existing situation while a new rule applies to all future cases. This paper focuses on the use of grandfather clauses in health technology appraisals (HTAs) issued by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the United Kingdom. NICE provides evidence‐based guidance on healthcare technologies and public health interventions that influence resource allocation decisions in the National Health Service (NHS) and the broader public (...)
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  41.  8
    The Cost of Safety: Balancing Risk and Liberty in Psychiatric Units.Rocksheng Zhong & Tobias Wasser - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):173-177.
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  42.  6
    Autonomy and Social Influence in Predictive Genetic Testing Decision‐Making: A Qualitative Interview Study.Bettina M. Zimmermann, Insa Koné, David Shaw & Bernice Elger - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (2):199-206.
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  43.  12
    In Defense of Dignity: Reflections on the Moral Function of Human Dignity.Vilhjálmur Árnason - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):31-39.
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  44.  14
    Orphans by Design: The Future of Genetic Parenthood.Hilary Bowman-Smart - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):23-30.
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  45.  5
    Changing Our Perspective: Is There a Government Obligation to Promote Autonomy Through the Provision of Public Prenatal Screening?Aya Enzo, Taketoshi Okita & Atsushi Asai - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):40-46.
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  46.  33
    The Use of Human Artificial Gametes and the Limits of Reproductive Freedom.Dustin Gooßens - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):72-78.
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  47.  11
    Does the Heterogeneity of Autism Undermine the Neurodiversity Paradigm?Jonathan A. Hughes - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):47-60.
    The neurodiversity paradigm is presented by its proponents as providing a philosophical foundation for the activism of the neurodiversity movement. Its central claims are that autism and other neurodivergent conditions are not disorders because they are not intrinsically harmful, and that they are valuable, natural and/or normal parts of human neurocognitive variation. This paper: (a) identifies the non‐disorder claim as the most central of these, based on its prominence in the literature and connections with the practical policy claims that the (...)
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  48.  13
    Public Reasoning About Voluntary Assisted Dying: An Analysis of Submissions to the Queensland Parliament, Australia.David G. Kirchhoffer & Chi-Wai Lui - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):105-116.
    The use of voluntary assisted dying as an end‐of‐life option has stimulated concerns and debates over the past decades. Although public attitudes towards voluntary assisted dying (including euthanasia and physician‐assisted suicide) are well researched, there has been relatively little study of the different reasons, normative reasoning and rhetorical strategies that people invoke in supporting or contesting voluntary assisted dying in everyday life. Using a mix of computational textual mining techniques, keyword study and qualitative thematic coding to analyse public submissions to (...)
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  49. Autonomy and the Limits of Cognitive Enhancement.Jonathan Lewis - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):15-22.
    In the debates regarding the ethics of human enhancement, proponents have found it difficult to refute the concern, voiced by certain bioconservatives, that cognitive enhancement violates the autonomy of the enhanced. However, G. Owen Schaefer, Guy Kahane and Julian Savulescu have attempted not only to avoid autonomy-based bioconservative objections, but to argue that cognition-enhancing biomedical interventions can actually enhance autonomy. In response, this paper has two aims: firstly, to explore the limits of their argument; secondly, and more importantly, to develop (...)
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  50.  27
    Bioethics Met its COVID‐19 Waterloo: The Doctor Knows Best Again.Jonathan Lewis & Udo Schuklenk - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):3-5.
    The late Robert Veatch, one of the United States’ founders of bioethics, never tired of reminding us that the paradigm-shifting contribution that bioethics made to patient care was to liberate patients out of the hands of doctors, who were traditionally seen to know best, even when they decidedly did not know best. It seems to us that with the advent of COVID-19, health policy has come full-circle on this. COVID-19 gave rise to a large number of purportedly “ethical” guidance documents (...)
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  51.  6
    Reasons to Redefine Moral Distress: A Feminist Empirical Bioethics Analysis.Georgina Morley, Caroline Bradbury-Jones & Jonathan Ives - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):61-71.
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  52.  88
    Rethinking the Oversight Conditions of Human–Animal Chimera Research.Monika Piotrowska - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):98-104.
    New discoveries are improving the odds of human cells surviving in host animals, prompting regulatory and funding agencies to issue calls for additional layers of ethical oversight for certain types of human–animal chimeras. Of interest are research proposals involving chimeric animals with humanized brains. But what is motivating the demand for additional oversight? I locate two, not obviously compatible, motivations, each of which provides the justificatory basis for paying special attention to different sets of human–animal chimeras. Surprisingly, the sets of (...)
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  53.  12
    A Sufficiency Threshold is Not a Harm Principle: A Better Alternative to Best Interests for Overriding Parental Decisions.Ben Saunders - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):90-97.
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  54.  14
    Responsibility Amid the Social Determinants of Health.Ben Schwan - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):6-14.
    It is natural to think that there is a tight connection between whether someone is responsible for some outcome and whether it is appropriate to hold her accountable for that outcome. And this natural thought naturally extends to health: if someone is responsible for her health, then, all else being equal, she is accountable for it. Given this, some have thought that responsibility for health has an important role to play in distributing the benefits and burdens of healthcare. But there (...)
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  55.  5
    The Health Sphere Beyond Borders: Coverage Portability and Justice in a Global Space.Adam K. Webb - 2021 - Bioethics 35 (1):79-89.
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  56.  89
    If Fetuses Are Persons, Abortion is a Public Health Crisis.Bruce Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2021 - Bioethics 1:1-14.
    Pro-life advocates commonly argue that fetuses have the moral status of persons, and an accompanying right to life, a view most pro-choice advocates deny. A difficulty for this pro-life position has been Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, in which she argues that even if the fetus is a person, abortion is often permissible because a pregnant woman is not obliged to continue to offer her body as life support. Here, we outline the moral theories underlying public health ethics, and examine (...)
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  57.  12
    Affecting Future Individuals: Why and When Germline Genome Editing Entails a Greater Moral Obligation Towards Progeny.Davide Battisti - 2021 - Bioethics:1-9.
    Assisted reproductive technologies have greatly increased our control over reproductive choices, leading some bioethicists to argue that we face unprecedented moral obligations towards progeny. Several models attempting to balance the principle of procreative autonomy with these obligations have been proposed. The least demanding is the minimal threshold model (MTM), according to which every reproductive choice is permissible, except creating children whose lives will not be worth living. Hence, as long as the future child is likely to have a life worth (...)
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