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  1. Does Written Informed Consent Adequately Inform Surgical Patients? A Cross Sectional Study.Erminia Agozzino, Sharon Borrelli, Mariagrazia Cancellieri, Fabiola Michela Carfora, Teresa Di Lorenzo & Francesco Attena - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1.
    Informed consent is an essential step in helping patients be aware of consequences of their treatment decisions. With surgery, it is vitally important for patients to understand the risks and benefits of the procedure and decide accordingly. We explored whether a written IC form was provided to patients; whether they read and signed it; whether they communicated orally with the physician; whether these communications influenced patient decisions. Adult postsurgical patients in nine general hospitals of Italy’s Campania Region were interviewed via (...)
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  2.  1
    The Picture Talk Project: Aboriginal Community Input on Consent for Research.Emily F. M. Fitzpatrick, Gaynor Macdonald, Alexandra L. C. Martiniuk, June Oscar, Heather D’Antoine, Maureen Carter, Tom Lawford & Elizabeth J. Elliott - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):12.
    The consent and community engagement process for research with Indigenous communities is rarely evaluated. Research protocols are not always collaborative, inclusive or culturally respectful. If participants do not trust or understand the research, selection bias may occur in recruitment, affecting study results potentially denying participants the opportunity to provide more knowledge and greater understanding about their community. Poorly informed consent can also harm the individual participant and the community as a whole. Invited by local Aboriginal community leaders of the Fitzroy (...)
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  3.  1
    Participants’ Awareness of Ethical Compliance, Safety and Protection During Participation in Pharmaceutical Industry Clinical Trials: A Controlled Survey.Gerardo González-Saldivar, René Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Jose Luis Viramontes-Madrid, Alejandro Salcido-Montenegro, Neri Alejandro Álvarez-Villalobos, Victoria González-Nava & José Gerardo González-González - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):2.
    The rapid increase of industry-sponsored clinical research towards developing countries has led to potentially complex ethical issues to assess. There is scarce evidence about the perception of these participants about the ethical compliance, security, and protection. We sought to evaluate and contrast the awareness and perception of participants and non-participants of industry-sponsored research trials on ethical, safety, and protection topics. A Cases-control survey conducted at twelve research sites in México. Previous and current participants of ISRT as well as non-participants with (...)
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  4.  3
    Conscientious Objection to Abortion, the Law and its Implementation in Victoria, Australia: Perspectives of Abortion Service Providers.Louise Anne Keogh, Lynn Gillam, Marie Bismark, Kathleen McNamee, Amy Webster, Christine Bayly & Danielle Newton - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):11.
    In Victoria, Australia, the law regulating abortion was reformed in 2008, and a clause was introduced requiring doctors with a conscientious objection to abortion to refer women to another provider. This study reports the views of abortion experts on the operation of Section 8 of the Abortion Law Reform Act in Victoria. Nineteen semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively selected Victorian abortion experts in 2015. Interviews explored the impact of abortion law reform on service provision, including the understanding and (...)
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  5.  2
    How to Effectively Obtain Informed Consent in Trauma Patients: A Systematic Review.Yen-Ko Lin, Kuan-Ting Liu, Chao-Wen Chen, Wei-Che Lee, Chia-Ju Lin, Leiyu Shi & Yin-Chun Tien - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):8.
    Obtaining adequate informed consent from trauma patients is challenging and time-consuming. Healthcare providers must communicate complicated medical information to enable patients to make informed decisions. This study aimed to explore the challenges of obtaining valid consent and methods of improving the quality of the informed consent process for surgical procedures in trauma patients. We conducted a systematic review of relevant English-language full-text original articles retrieved from PubMed that had experimental or observational study design and involved adult trauma patients. Studies involving (...)
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  6.  1
    A Framework for the Ethical Assessment of Chimeric Animal Research Involving Human Neural Tissue.Sebastian Porsdam Mann, Rosa Sun & Göran Hermerén - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):10.
    Animal models of human diseases are often used in biomedical research in place of human subjects. However, results obtained by animal models may fail to hold true for humans. One way of addressing this problem is to make animal models more similar to humans by placing human tissue into animal models, rendering them chimeric. Since technical and ethical limitations make neurological disorders difficult to study in humans, chimeric models with human neural tissue could help advance our understanding of neuropathophysiology. In (...)
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  7. Kenyan Health Stakeholder Views on Individual Consent, General Notification and Governance Processes for the Re-Use of Hospital Inpatient Data to Support Learning on Healthcare Systems.Daniel Mbuthia, Sassy Molyneux, Maureen Njue, Salim Mwalukore & Vicki Marsh - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):3.
    Increasing adoption of electronic health records in hospitals provides new opportunities for patient data to support public health advances. Such learning healthcare models have generated ethical debate in high-income countries, including on the role of patient and public consent and engagement. Increasing use of electronic health records in low-middle income countries offers important potential to fast-track healthcare improvements in these settings, where a disproportionate burden of global morbidity occurs. Core ethical issues have been raised around the role and form of (...)
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  8.  2
    The Psychology of “Cure” - Unique Challenges to Consent Processes in HIV Cure Research in South Africa.Keymanthri Moodley, Ciara Staunton, Theresa Rossouw, Malcolm de Roubaix, Zoe Duby & Donald Skinner - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):9.
    Consent processes for clinical trials involving HIV prevention research have generated considerable debate globally over the past three decades. HIV cure/eradication research is scientifically more complex and consequently, consent processes for clinical trials in this field are likely to pose a significant challenge. Given that research efforts are now moving toward HIV eradication, stakeholder engagement to inform appropriate ethics oversight of such research is timely. This study sought to establish the perspectives of a wide range of stakeholders in HIV treatment (...)
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  9.  4
    Shall Parent / Patient Wishes Be Fulfilled in Any Case? A Series of 32 Ethics Consultations: From Reproductive Medicine to Neonatology.Mirella Muggli, Christian De Geyter & Stella Reiter-Theil - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):4.
    Questions concerning the parent/ patient’s autonomy are seen as one of the most important reasons for requesting Ethics Consultations. Respecting parent/ patient’s autonomy also means respecting the patient’s wishes. But those wishes may be controversial and sometimes even go beyond legal requirements. The objective of this case series of 32 ECs was to illustrate ethically challenging parent / patients’ wishes during the first stages of life and how the principle of patient’s autonomy was handled. The case series has a qualitative (...)
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  10.  1
    Research Approvals Iceberg: How a ‘Low-Key’ Study in England Needed 89 Professionals to Approve It and How We Can Do Better.Mila Petrova & Stephen Barclay - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):7.
    The red tape and delays around research ethics and governance approvals frequently frustrate researchers yet, as the lesser of two evils, are largely accepted as unavoidable. Here we quantify aspects of the research ethics and governance approvals for one interview- and questionnaire-based study conducted in England which used the National Health Service procedures and the electronic Integrated Research Application System. We demonstrate the enormous impact of existing approvals processes on costs of studies, including opportunity costs to focus on the substantive (...)
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  11. Using Animal-Derived Constituents in Anaesthesia and Surgery: The Case for Disclosing to Patients.Daniel Rodger & Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):14.
    Animal-derived constituents are frequently used in anaesthesia and surgery, and patients are seldom informed of this. This is problematic for a growing minority of patients who may have religious or secular concerns about their use in their care. It is not currently common practice to inform patients about the use of animal-derived constituents, yet what little empirical data does exist indicates that many patients want the opportunity to give their informed consent. First we review the nature and scale of the (...)
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  12.  7
    Illness and Disease: An Empirical-Ethical Viewpoint.Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):5.
    The concepts of disease, illness and sickness capture fundamentally different aspects of phenomena related to human ailments and healthcare. The philosophy and theory of medicine are making manifold efforts to capture the essence and normative implications of these concepts. In parallel, socio-empirical studies on patients’ understanding of their situation have yielded a comprehensive body of knowledge regarding subjective perspectives on health-related statuses. Although both scientific fields provide varied valuable insights, they have not been strongly linked to each other. Therefore, the (...)
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  13.  13
    Circumcision Registry Promotes Precise Research and Fosters Informed Parental Decisions.Robert S. Van Howe, Morten Frisch, Peter W. Adler & J. Steven Svoboda - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):6.
    In 2017 Ploug and Holm argued that anonymizing individuals in the Danish circumcision registry was insufficient to protect these individuals from what they regard as the potential harms of being in the registry. We argue that Ploug and Holm’s fears in each of the areas are misguided, not supported by the evidence, and could interfere with the gathering of accurate data. The extent of the risks and harms associated with ritual circumcision is not well known. The anonymized personal health data (...)
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  14. Truth-Telling and Doctor-Assisted Death as Perceived by Israeli Physicians.Baruch Velan, Arnona Ziv, Giora Kaplan, Carmit Rubin, Yaron Connelly, Tami Karni & Orna Tal - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):13.
    Medicine has undergone substantial changes in the way medical dilemmas are being dealt with. Here we explore the attitude of Israeli physicians to two debatable dilemmas: disclosing the full truth to patients about a poor medical prognosis, and assisting terminally ill patients in ending their lives. Attitudes towards medico-ethical dilemmas were examined through a nationwide online survey conducted among members of the Israeli Medical Association, yielding 2926 responses. Close to 60% of the respondents supported doctor-assisted death, while one third rejected (...)
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